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See detailThe use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to treat chronic tendinopathies: a technical analysis
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Emonds-Alt, Thibault ULg

in Platelets (in press)

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is blood plasma with a high concentration of autologous platelets which constitute an immense reservoir of growth factors. The clinical use of PRP is widespread in various ... [more ▼]

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is blood plasma with a high concentration of autologous platelets which constitute an immense reservoir of growth factors. The clinical use of PRP is widespread in various medical applications. Although highly popular with athletes, the use of PRP for the treatment of tendinopathies remains scientifically controversial, particularly due to the diversity of products that go by the name of “PRP.” To optimize its use, it is important to look at the various stages of obtaining PRP. In this literature review, we take a closer look at eight parameters which may influence the quality of PRP: 1) anticoagulants used to preserve the best platelet function, 2) the speed of centrifugation used to extract the platelets, 3) the platelet concentrations obtained, 4) the impact of the concentration of red and while blood cells on PRP actions, 5) platelet activators encouraging platelet degranulation and, hence, the release of growth factors, and 6) the use or nonuse of local anesthetics when carrying out infiltration. In addition to these parameters, it may be interesting to analyze other variables such as 7) the use of ultrasound guidance during the injection with a view to determining the influence they have on potential recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailBrentano's Mind: Unity Without Simplicity
Dewalque, Arnaud ULg

in Rivista di Filosofia (in press)

This paper offers a reconstruction of Franz Brentano’s mereological solution to the problem of the unity of consciousness and explores some implications of this solution for the ontology of the mind. In ... [more ▼]

This paper offers a reconstruction of Franz Brentano’s mereological solution to the problem of the unity of consciousness and explores some implications of this solution for the ontology of the mind. In section 1 I sketch Brentano’s ontological distinctions between things, collectives, and divisives. In section 2 I present Brentano’s mereological solution and in section 3 I review his main pro-arguments. Eventually, in section 4 I consider some Jamesian objections to the mereological approach. I argue the notion of ‘mental parts’ can be given a rather innocuous meaning by being conceived of as the expression of conceptual distinctions grounded in similarity and contrast relations between total mental phenomena. [less ▲]

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See detailHemicelluloses and Lignin in Biorefineries
wertz, Jean-Luc; Deleu, Magali ULg; Coppée, Séverine et al

Book published by CRC Press (in press)

Hemicelluloses and Lignin in Biorefineries provides an understanding of lignocellulosic biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. It promotes the valorization of these ... [more ▼]

Hemicelluloses and Lignin in Biorefineries provides an understanding of lignocellulosic biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. It promotes the valorization of these molecules in the context of the bioeconomy and presents hemicelluloses and lignin, which are generated in lignocellulosic biorefineries, as the molecules of the future. The viability of these molecules lies in their renewability and potential. This book covers all aspects of hemicelluloses and lignin including structure, biosynthesis, extraction, biodegradation, and conversion. The book also looks ahead to the socioeconomic and environmental value of biobased industry and emphasizes an understanding of the potential of lignocellulosic biomass. [less ▲]

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See detailWas there a Roman Linguistic Imperialism during the Republic and the early Principate
Rochette, Bruno ULg

in Lingue e Linguaggio (in press)

One of the main consequences of the Roman conquest was the diffusion of the Latin language and of Roman culture throughout the conquered countries. According to many texts of the imperial period, Latin ... [more ▼]

One of the main consequences of the Roman conquest was the diffusion of the Latin language and of Roman culture throughout the conquered countries. According to many texts of the imperial period, Latin became a universal language during the Imperium Romanum. But what is the reality? Did Rome develop any linguistic policies? There is some evidence to show that Rome’s response regarding the sociolinguistic problems that arose under its rule was to be flexible and willing to adapt to the specific requirements of each situation. Under the Republic and the early Principate, there was, in fact, a great flexibility in language use by the Romans in their dealings with the Greek world. Even though Latin-Greek bilingualism was widespread among the Romans of the Republic and the early Principate, in the public context, Latin maintained a high-level role because it represented the language of Rome’s power. In spite of this flexible approach to language use, a natural competition developed between the language of the dominant and the language of the dominated. In the Occident, Latin became the only vehicle of communication, both oral and written, whereas in the Orient, one notes a paradoxical situation: the Hellenization of the Romans due to the high cultural position of the Greek language. However, this dichotomy did not produce a division of the Roman Empire into two impenetrable parts, closed to mutual linguistic and cultural influences, but rather, it generated a more complicated situation, especially in the Oriental part of the Empire. It is this situation that will be analyzed in the present paper. [less ▲]

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See detailSystem-based approaches for structural optimization of flexible mechanisms
Tromme, Emmanuel; Held, Alexander; Duysinx, Pierre ULg et al

in Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering (in press)

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art methods to perform structural optimization of flexible mechanisms. These methods are based on a system-based approach, i.e. the formulation of the design problem ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art methods to perform structural optimization of flexible mechanisms. These methods are based on a system-based approach, i.e. the formulation of the design problem incorporates the time response of the mechanism that is obtained from a dynamic simulation of the flexible multibody system. The system-based approach aims at considering as precisely as possible the effects of nonlinear dynamic loading under various operating conditions. Also, the optimization process enhances most existing studies which are limited to (quasi-) static or frequency domain loading conditions. This paper briefly introduces flexible multibody system dynamics and structural optimization techniques. Afterwards, the two main methods, named the weakly and the fully coupled methods, that couple both disciplines are presented in details and the influence of the multibody system formalism is analyzed. The advantages and drawbacks of both methods are discussed and future possible research areas are mentioned. [less ▲]

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See detailReinforced poly(hydroxyurethane) thermosets as high performance adhesives for aluminum substrates
Panchireddy, Satyannarayana ULg; Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Grignard, Bruno ULg et al

in Polymer Chemistry (in press)

Poly(hydroxyurethane) (PHU) thermosets reinforced with (functional) nanofillers were developed to design high performance adhesives for bare aluminum. Solvent-free cyclic carbonate/amine/PDMS formulations ... [more ▼]

Poly(hydroxyurethane) (PHU) thermosets reinforced with (functional) nanofillers were developed to design high performance adhesives for bare aluminum. Solvent-free cyclic carbonate/amine/PDMS formulations loaded with native, epoxy- or cyclic carbonate-functionalized ZnO nanofillers were premixed before deposition and thermal curing onto Al. The results highlight that the addition of PDMS prevents PHUs from delamination of the Al surface by increasing the adhesive hydrophobicity and thus limiting the water uptake. The dispersion of functional fillers within PHUs improves their thermal and mechanical properties. Benchmarking of the adhesive performances of the reinforced PHU glues with existing PHU formulations attests for the benefits of dispersing functional fillers and PDMS within the resin and evidences a 270% increase of the shear strength of reinforced PHUs adhesives compared to formulations reported in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailVoice use among music theory teachers: A voice dosimetry and self-assessment study
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Remacle, Angélique ULg

in Journal of Voice (in press)

Objectives: (1) To investigate music theory teachers’ professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background ... [more ▼]

Objectives: (1) To investigate music theory teachers’ professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data. Methods: Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. Parameters analysed were voice SPL, F0, phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI) and noise SPL. Spearman’s correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0 and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analogue scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman’s correlation. Results: Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time and females’ F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue and amount of singing and speaking voice produced. Conclusions: Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well-aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analogue scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users. [less ▲]

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See detailPotential demal exposure of florists to fungicide residues on flowers and risk assessment
Toumi; Joly, L.; Vleminckx, C. et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (in press)

Flowers are susceptible to many pests and diseases. Therefore, they can be sprayed several times during their growth considering that no MRL are set for flow-ers. High levels of pesticide residues ... [more ▼]

Flowers are susceptible to many pests and diseases. Therefore, they can be sprayed several times during their growth considering that no MRL are set for flow-ers. High levels of pesticide residues potentially expose daily the florists who han-dle cut flowers and possibly could endanger their health. A study was carried out to evaluate the risk for florists exposed to fungicide residues during normal profes-sional tasks. Cotton gloves were distributed to 20 florists (two pairs to each florist) and worn during two consecutive half days during normal professional tasks (from min 2 hours to max 3 hours/day) to measure their potential dermal exposure (PDE). Samples were analyzed with a multi-residue (QuEChERS) method validated by a laboratory accredited for pesticide residues and with a combination of gas and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It appears from the results that a total of 54 fungicides with different toxicity classes were detected on cotton gloves. An average of 15.53 mg/kg fungicide residues per glove sample was meas-ured. Six of 54 are suspected of causing cancer after prolonged or repeated expo-sure. Boscalid was both the active substance for which the highest maximum and average concentrations (26.21 and 3.47 mg/kg, respectively). Famoxadone had the most critical PDE (156% AOEL for the maximum concentration). As a consequence, this study leads to conclude that Belgian florists, who worked for several years and handled a large number of flowers contaminated by high concentrations of pesti-cide residues, are exposed daily with a potential effect on their health. This sug-gests that safety standards should be set for residue levels on cut flowers. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk assessment for small farmers exposed to plant protection products in the Niger River valley
Massalatchi Illyassou, Karimoun; Adamou, R.; Schiffers, Bruno ULg

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (in press)

Plant protection products play a very important role in agriculture. However, their misuse can have serious negative impacts both on human health and environment. A study was carried out to identify the ... [more ▼]

Plant protection products play a very important role in agriculture. However, their misuse can have serious negative impacts both on human health and environment. A study was carried out to identify the plant protection products used in the Niger River valley and to observe the local pesticide management practices. Ten active substances were identified as the most used chemicals by farmers. Their toxicological properties were characterized and their respective Potential Dermal Exposures (PDE) was evaluated in order to assess the risk level for the local small growers. The UK Predictive Operator Exposure Model was used to quantify the PDE during mixing/loading and application according to the local practices. The survey shows that the most common active substances are organophosphate or pyrethroids insecticides. In addition, some other prohibited and counterfeit pesticides cocktails are also used. All active substances used in Niger River valley are highly toxic. When sprayed without personal protective equipment (PPE) they could induce significant harmful impacts on the human health after exposure. The predictive exposure levels vary from 0.0013 mg/kg bw/day to 0.4125 mg/kg bw/day, several times higher the Acceptable Operator Exposure Level (AOEL) for all actives substances. The survey also revealed that 76% of operators do not use any PPE during mixing/loading or spraying. Other bad practices observed in study area can increase the exposure of operators. Moreover, local consumers could also be exposed through intake of pesticide residues on harvested products. [less ▲]

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See detailAvoidance of protein oxidation correlates with the desiccation and radiation resistance of hot and cold desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis
Fagliarone, Claudia; Mosca, Claudia; Ubaldi, Ilaria et al

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (in press)

In order to investigate the relationship between desiccation and the extent of protein oxidation in desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis a selection of 10 isolates from hot and cold deserts and the ... [more ▼]

In order to investigate the relationship between desiccation and the extent of protein oxidation in desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis a selection of 10 isolates from hot and cold deserts and the terrestrial cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis thermalis sp. PCC 7203, were exposed to desiccation (air-drying) and analysed for survival. Strain CCMEE 029 from the Negev desert and the aquatic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were further investigated for protein oxidation after desiccation (drying over silica gel), treatment with H2O2 up to 1M and exposure to γ-rays up to 25 kGy. Then a selection of desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis with different survival rates after prolonged desiccation, as well as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis sp. PCC 7203, were analysed for protein oxidation after treatment with 10 mM and 100 mM of H2O2. Results suggest that in the investigated strains a tight correlation occurs between desiccation and radiation tolerance and avoidance of protein oxidation [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae) from Senegal
Diop, Serigne Mbacké; Guèye, Momar Talla; Ndiaye, Ibrahima et al

in International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences (in press)

This work aimed to study the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae) from Senegal. The plants were collected in two different localities ... [more ▼]

This work aimed to study the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae) from Senegal. The plants were collected in two different localities, Dakar and Kaolack. The extracts were obtained by steam distillation from both fresh and dried plants and analyses carried out by GC/FID and GC/MS. Oils from Dakar were dominated by geranial which represented 46.0-43.9%, neral 31.8-31.0%, myrcene 10.8-11.7% and geraniol 2.7-4.2% in the fresh and dried plants, respectively. Their floral waters contained mainly 44.6-41.4% geranial, 39.7-35.6% neral and 8.8-13.2% geraniol. The oils from Kaolack were characterized by geranial which constituted 49.5-44.5%, neral 33.3-31.2%, myrcene 7.2-9.6% and geraniol 4.3-6.1% in the fresh and dried plants, respectively. In their floral waters, it is identified 42.8-33.6% geranial, 38.4-27.6% neral and 12.5-24.5% geraniol. This original study revealed that both oils and floral waters of C. citratus from Senegal are characterized by geranial and neral whose repellent properties against mosquitoes are known. [less ▲]

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See detail« Du définitif sur du provisoire… » : Psychopathologie et tatouage
Englebert, Jérôme ULg; Follet, Valérie

in Feneuil, Anthony; Krtolica, Igor (Eds.) L’expérience de l’éternité : Philosophie, clinique, mystique (in press)

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See detailProbabilistic Framework for the Characterization of Surfaces and Edges in Range Images, with Application to Edge Detection
Lejeune, Antoine ULg; Verly, Jacques ULg; Van Droogenbroeck, Marc ULg

in IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis & Machine Intelligence (in press)

We develop a powerful probabilistic framework for the local characterization of surfaces and edges in range images, which is useful in many applications of computer vision, such as filtering, edge ... [more ▼]

We develop a powerful probabilistic framework for the local characterization of surfaces and edges in range images, which is useful in many applications of computer vision, such as filtering, edge detection, feature extraction, and classification. We use the geometrical nature of the data to derive an analytic expression for the joint probability density function (pdf) for the random variables used to model the ranges of a set of pixels in a local neighborhood of an image. We decompose this joint pdf by considering independently the cases where two real world points corresponding to two neighboring pixels are locally on the same real world surface or not. In particular, we show that this joint pdf is linked to the Voigt pdf and not to the Gaussian pdf as it is assumed in some applications. We apply our framework to edge detection and develop a locally adaptive algorithm that is based on a probabilistic decision rule. We show in an objective evaluation that this new edge detector performs better than prior art edge detectors. This proves the benefits of the probabilistic characterization of the local neighborhood as a tool to improve applications that involve range images. [less ▲]

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See detailA new approach for time-lapse data weighting in ERT
Lesparre, Nolwenn ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Kemna, Andreas et al

in Geophysics (in press)

Applications of timelapse inversion of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) allows monitoring variations in the subsurface that play a key role in a variety of contexts. The inversion of timelapse data ... [more ▼]

Applications of timelapse inversion of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) allows monitoring variations in the subsurface that play a key role in a variety of contexts. The inversion of timelapse data provides successive images of the subsurface properties showing the medium evolution. Images quality is highly dependent on the data weighting determined from the data error estimates. However, the quantification of errors in the inversion of timelapse data has not yet been addressed. We propose a methodology for the quantification of timelapse data error based on the analysis of the discrepancy between normal and reciprocal readings acquired at different times. We apply the method to field monitoring data sets collected during the injection of heated water in a shallow aquifer. We tested different error models to show that the use of an appropriate time-lapse data error estimate yields significant improvements in terms of imaging. An adapted inversion weighting for time-lapse data implies that the procedure does not allow an over-fitting of the data, so the presence of artifacts in the resulting images is greatly reduced. Our results demonstrate that a proper estimate of time-lapse data error is mandatory for weighting optimally the inversion in order to obtain images that best reflect the medium properties evolution through time. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning an air-to-air heat exchanger dedicated to single room ventilation with heat recovery
Gendebien, Samuel ULg; Martens, Jonathan; Prieels, Luc et al

in Building Simulation: An International Journal (in press)

The present paper focuses on the development steps of heat exchangers dedicated to single room ventilation unit with heat recovery (SRVHR) by proposing a numerical approach. A methodology is suggested in ... [more ▼]

The present paper focuses on the development steps of heat exchangers dedicated to single room ventilation unit with heat recovery (SRVHR) by proposing a numerical approach. A methodology is suggested in order to determine the best trade-off between hydraulic and thermal performance given a specific geometry. The methodology consists in a mapping of the coefficient of performance (COP) of the unit. The latter is defined as the ratio between recovered heat and the fan energy use, given a specific indoor/outdoor temperature difference. However, the energy performance should not be the only criterion to be taken into account in the frame of the design steps of a heat recovery exchanger: technical, economic and acoustic aspects should also be considered. This numerical methodology is illustrated by means of a real example of a newly developed heat exchanger dedicated to a SRVHR. The optimization is first performed while using a semi-empirical model (based on the use of correlations and on a spatial division of the studied heat exchanger). The semi-empirical model allows for the creation of a COP map in order to identify the most effective geometry parameters for the heat exchanger. The decision concerning the final geometry is made accounting for the so-called technical, economic and acoustic considerations. A discussion on some parameters needed for the COP establishment is also proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailExozodiacal clouds: Hot and warm dust around main sequence stars
Kral, Quentin; Krivov, Alexander V.; Defrere, Denis ULg et al

in Astronomical Review (in press)

A warm/hot dust component (at temperature $>$ 300K) has been detected around $\sim$ 20% of stars. This component is called "exozodiacal dust" as it presents similarities with the zodiacal dust detected in ... [more ▼]

A warm/hot dust component (at temperature $>$ 300K) has been detected around $\sim$ 20% of stars. This component is called "exozodiacal dust" as it presents similarities with the zodiacal dust detected in our Solar System, even though its physical properties and spatial distribution can be significantly different. Understanding the origin and evolution of this dust is of crucial importance, not only because its presence could hamper future detections of Earth-like planets in their habitable zones, but also because it can provide invaluable information about the inner regions of planetary systems. In this review, we present a detailed overview of the observational techniques used in the detection and characterisation of exozodiacal dust clouds ("exozodis") and the results they have yielded so far, in particular regarding the incidence rate of exozodis as a function of crucial parameters such as stellar type and age, or the presence of an outer cold debris disc. We also present the important constraints that have been obtained, on dust size distribution and spatial location, by using state-of-the-art radiation transfer models on some of these systems. Finally, we investigate the crucial issue of how to explain the presence of exozodiacal dust around so many stars (regardless of their ages) despite the fact that such dust so close to its host star should disappear rapidly due to the coupled effect of collisions and stellar radiation pressure. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed to solve this paradox and are reviewed in detail in this paper. The review finishes by presenting the future of this growing field. [less ▲]

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See detailKIAA1199: a novel regulator of MEK/ERK-induced Schwann cell dedifferentiation
Boerboom, Angelique; Reusch, Céline ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra ULg et al

in Glia (in press)

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See detailVirtual Trials of the NICE-SUGAR Protocol: The Impact on Performance of Protocol and Protocol Compliance
Uyttendaele, Vincent ULg; Dickson, Jennifer L.; Shaw, Geoffrey M. et al

in IFAC-PapersOnLine (in press)

Hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and blood glucose (BG) variability are associated with worsened outcomes in critical care. However, NICE-SUGAR trial showed no clinical benefit from intensive insulin therapy ... [more ▼]

Hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and blood glucose (BG) variability are associated with worsened outcomes in critical care. However, NICE-SUGAR trial showed no clinical benefit from intensive insulin therapy. This study compares the table-based NICE-SUGAR and model-based STAR protocols to assess their relative capability to achieve safe, effective control for all patients. Validated virtual patients (n=443) were used to simulate glycaemic outcomes of the NICE-SUGAR and STAR protocols. Key outcomes evaluate tightness and safety of control for all patients: %BG in 80–144 mg/dL range (PTR); Per-Patient Mean BG (PPM_BG); and Incidence of Hypoglycaemia (BG<40 mg/dL). These metrics determine performance overall, for each patient, and safety. Results are assessed for NICE-SUGAR measuring per-protocol (~24/day) and at reported average rate (~3-hourly; ~8/day). STAR measures 1-3-hourly, averaging 12/day. Per-protocol, STAR provided tight control, with higher PTR (90.7% vs. 78.3%) and tighter median [IQR] PPM_BG (112[106-119] vs. 117[106–137] mg/dL), and greater safety from hypoglycaemia (5 (1%) vs. 10 patients (2.5%)) compared to NICE-SUGAR simulations as per protocol. The 5-95th percentile range PPM_BG for NICE-SUGAR (97–185 mg/dL) showed ~5% of NICE-SUGAR patients had mean BG above 180mg/dL matching clinically reported performance. STAR’s 5th-90th PPM_BG percentile range was (97–146 mg/dL). Measuring as recorded clinically, NICE-SUGAR had PTR of 77%, PPM_BG of 122 [110-140] mg/dL and 24(6%) of patients experienced hypoglycaemia. These results match clinically reported values well (mean BG 115 vs. 118 mg/dL clinically vs. simulation, clinically 7% of patients had a hypoglycaemic event). Glycaemic control protocols need to be both safe and effective for all patients before potential clinical benefits can be assessed. NICE-SUGAR clinical results do not match results expected from their protocol, and show reduced safety and performance in comparison to STAR. [less ▲]

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