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See detail“How are you Vulnerable?”: Using Participation for Vulnerability Analysis in Emergency Planning
Rossignol, Nicolas ULg; Turcanu, Catrinel; Fallon, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Risk Research (in press)

Scientists in many fields of research have developed models, theories and concepts attempting to grasp and manage dangers that are often difficult to imagine. Among the different perspectives, the Science ... [more ▼]

Scientists in many fields of research have developed models, theories and concepts attempting to grasp and manage dangers that are often difficult to imagine. Among the different perspectives, the Science and Technology Studies (STS) Vulnerability Approach seems very promising. Relying on a constructivist paradigm, it is based on an inductive collection and analysis of a wide range of factors, with a particular focus on cultural factors and actual day-to-day practices. In this paper, we present the roots of this approach and we display findings based on three case studies exploring emergency planning in three different contexts (a city near a SEVESO plant, a school near a nuclear plant, and a city confronted to multiple catastrophic scenarios). The cases studies were realized by conducting three Focus Groups with different types of stakeholders (citizens, teachers, firemen, decision makers, etc.). After presenting the results of the case studies, we discuss how stakeholders’ participation can inform such type of vulnerability analysis in the context of emergency planning. We argue that participation fosters a deep understanding of actual safety governance practices which allows innovative results to emerge as well as it initiates a learning process among the participants. It contributes to questioning the relations between decision-makers, experts and citizens. It has the potential of bypassing the positivist and quantitative rationale of safety, and thus, of redefining the vulnerability governance. As a conclusion, we question the role of such STS vulnerability approach within the actual vulnerability governance. [less ▲]

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See detailCT SCAN FEATURES OF PRESUMPTIVE HAEMORRHAGIC STROKE IN A DOG WITH CUSHING’S DISEASE
Liotta, Annalisa Pia ULg; Cavrenne, Romain; Peeters, Dominique ULg et al

in Case reports in Veterinary Medicine (in press)

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See detailUne tablette scolaire copte de Lecce : TUL inv. C 1
Carlig, Nathan ULg; Delattre, Alain

in Studi di Egittologia e di Papirologia (in press)

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See detailEVALUATION OF A RAPID BEDSIDE SCORING SYSTEM FOR MICROCIRCULATION VIDEOS ACQUIRED FROM DOGS
Gommeren, Kris ULg; Allerton, Fergus; Morin, Elise et al

in Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (in press)

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See detailVirtual reality as a complementary therapy to sexual addiction treatment
Cismaru Inescu, Adina; Andrianne, Robert ULg; Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULg

in International Journal of Advanced Computer Science (in press), 3(7), 1-5

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See detailTowards a critical philosophy of norms
Pieron, Julien ULg

in de Beistegui, Miguel; Bianco, Giuseppe; Gracieuse, Marjorie (Eds.) The Care of Life : Transdisciplinary perspectives in Bioethics and Biopolitics (in press)

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See detailA review of inversion techniques related to the use of relationship matrices in animal breeding
Faux, Pierre ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (in press)

In animal breeding, prediction of genetic effects is usually obtained through the use of mixed models. For any of these genetic effects, mixed models require the inversion of the covariance matrix ... [more ▼]

In animal breeding, prediction of genetic effects is usually obtained through the use of mixed models. For any of these genetic effects, mixed models require the inversion of the covariance matrix associated to that effect, which is equal to the associated relationship matrix times the associated component of the genetic variance. Given the size of many genetic evaluation systems, computing the inverses of these relationship matrices is not trivial. In this review, we aim to cover computational techniques that ease inversion of relationship matrices used in animal breeding for prediction of the following different types of genetic effects: additive effect, gametic effect, effect due to presence of marked quantitative trait loci, dominance effect and different epistasis effects. Construction rules and inversion algorithms are detailed for each relationship matrix. In the final discussion, we draw up a common theoretical frame to most of the reviewed techniques. Two computational constraints come out of this theoretical frame: setting up the matrix of dependencies between levels of the effect and setting up some parts (diagonal or block-diagonal elements) of the relationship matrix to be inverted. [less ▲]

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See detailShort communication: Alteration of priors for random effects in Gaussian linear mixed models
Vandenplas, Jérémie ULg; Christensen, Ole F.; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Journal of Dairy Science (in press)

Linear mixed models, for which the prior multivariate normal distributions of random effects are assumed to have a mean equal to 0, are commonly used in animal breeding. However, some statistical analyses ... [more ▼]

Linear mixed models, for which the prior multivariate normal distributions of random effects are assumed to have a mean equal to 0, are commonly used in animal breeding. However, some statistical analyses (e.g., the consideration of a population under selection into a genomic scheme breeding, multiple-trait predictions of lactation yields, Bayesian approaches integrating external information into genetic evaluations) need to alter both the mean and (co)variance of the prior distributions and, to our knowledge, most software packages available in the animal breeding community do not permit such alterations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to propose a method to alter both the mean and (co)variance of the prior multivariate normal distributions of random effects of linear mixed models while using currently available software packages. The proposed method was tested on simulated examples with three different software packages available in animal breeding. The examples showed the possibility of the proposed method to alter both the mean and (co)variance of the prior distributions with currently available software packages through the use of an extended data file and a user supplied (co)variance matrix. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying Semitic loanwords in Late Egyptian
Winand, Jean ULg

in Dils, Peter; Grossman, Eitan; Richter, Sebastian (Eds.) et al Language Contact and Bilingualism in antiquity: What Linguistic Borrowing into Coptic can tell us about it (in press)

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See detailEnjeux de la vannerie dans 1 les aires protégées de Madagascar
Guillaud, Sylvie; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg

in Bois et Forêts des Tropiques (in press)

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See detailIntroduction
de Haro Sanchez, Magali ULg; Tissi, Lucia Maddalena

in de Haro Sanchez, Magali (Ed.) "Écrire la magie dans l'Antiquité - Scrivere la magia nell'Antichità". Actes du colloque international (Liège, 13-15 octobre 2011) (in press)

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See detailInteraction between dietary protein content and the source of carbohydrates along the gastrointestinal tract of weaned piglets.
Pieper, Robert; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

in Archives of Animal Nutrition (in press)

Although fermentable carbohydrates (CHO) can reduce metabolites derived from dietary protein fermentation in the intestine of pigs, the interaction between site of fermentation and substrate availability ... [more ▼]

Although fermentable carbohydrates (CHO) can reduce metabolites derived from dietary protein fermentation in the intestine of pigs, the interaction between site of fermentation and substrate availability along the gut is still unclear. The current study aimed at determining the impact of two different sources of carbohydrates in diets with low or very high protein content on microbial metabolite profiles along the gastrointestinal tract of piglets. Thirty-six piglets (n = 6 per group) were fed diets high (26%, HP) or low (18%, LP) in dietary protein and with or without two different sources of carbohydrates (12% sugar beet pulp, SBP, or 8% lignocellulose, LNC) in a 2 × 3 factorial design. After 3 weeks, contents from stomach, jejunum, ileum, caecum, proximal and distal colon were taken and analysed for major bacterial metabolites (D-lactate, L-lactate, short chain fatty acids, ammonia, amines, phenols and indols). Results indicate considerable fermentation of CHO and protein already in the stomach. HP diets increased the formation of ammonia, amines, phenolic and indolic compounds throughout the different parts of the intestine with most pronounced effects in the distal colon. Dietary SBP inclusion in LP diets favoured the formation of cadaverine in the proximal parts of the intestine. SBP mainly increased CHO-derived metabolites such as SCFA and lactate and decreased protein-derived metabolites in the large intestine. Based on metabolite profiles, LNC was partly fermented in the distal large intestine and reduced mainly phenols, indols and cadaverine, but not ammonia. Multivariate analysis confirmed more diet-specific metabolite patterns in the stomach, whereas the CHO addition was the main determinant in the caecum and proximal colon. The protein level mainly influenced the metabolite patterns in the distal colon. The results confirm the importance of CHO source to influence the formation of metabolites derived from protein fermentation along the intestinal tract of the pig. [less ▲]

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See detailAmulettes coptes « jumelles » de Strasbourg : P.Strasb. K 201 et K 202
de Haro Sanchez, Magali ULg

in Boud'hors; Delattre; Louis, Catherine (Eds.) et al Études coptes XII (in press)

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See detailL'idéologie de la Nieuw‐Vlaamse Alliantie
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

in Revue européenne de géopolitique Outre-Terre (in press)

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See detailMurs, Frontières et Liberté(s) de Circulation
Gemenne, François ULg

Book published by Fayard (in press)

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See detailThe evaluation of vocal accuracy: The case of operatic singing voices
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Magis, David ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

in Music Perception (in press)

The objective analysis of Western operatic singing voices indicates that professional singers can be particularly “out of tune”. This study aims to better understand the evaluation of operatic voices ... [more ▼]

The objective analysis of Western operatic singing voices indicates that professional singers can be particularly “out of tune”. This study aims to better understand the evaluation of operatic voices, which have particularly complex acoustical signals. Twenty-two music experts were asked to evaluate the vocal pitch accuracy of 14 sung performances with a pairwise comparison paradigm, in a test and a retest. In addition to the objective measurement of pitch accuracy (pitch interval deviation), several performance parameters (average tempo, fundamental frequency of the starting note) and quality parameters (energy distribution, vibrato rate and extent) were observed and compared to the judges’ perceptual rating. The results show high intra- and inter-judge reliability when rating the pitch accuracy of operatic singing voices. Surprisingly, all the parameters were significantly related to the ratings and explain 78.8% of the variability of the judges’ rating. The pitch accuracy evaluation of operatic voices is thus not based exclusively on the precision of performed music intervals but on a complex combination of performance and quality parameters. [less ▲]

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See detailA simulation study comparing multiple imputation methods for incomplete longitudinal ordinal data
Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg; Mauer, Murielle; Molenberghs, Geert et al

in Communications in Statistics : Simulation & Computation (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (12 ULg)