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See detailGenetic basis of congenital erythrocytosis: mutation update and online databases.
Bento, Celeste; Percy, Melanie J.; Gardie, Betty et al

in Human mutation (2014), 35(1), 15-26

Congenital erythrocytosis (CE), or congenital polycythemia, represents a rare and heterogeneous clinical entity. It is caused by deregulated red blood cell production where erythrocyte overproduction ... [more ▼]

Congenital erythrocytosis (CE), or congenital polycythemia, represents a rare and heterogeneous clinical entity. It is caused by deregulated red blood cell production where erythrocyte overproduction results in elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Primary congenital familial erythrocytosis is associated with low erythropoietin (Epo) levels and results from mutations in the Epo receptor gene (EPOR). Secondary CE arises from conditions causing tissue hypoxia and results in increased Epo production. These include hemoglobin variants with increased affinity for oxygen (HBB, HBA mutations), decreased production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate due to BPGM mutations, or mutations in the genes involved in the hypoxia sensing pathway (VHL, EPAS1, and EGLN1). Depending on the affected gene, CE can be inherited either in an autosomal dominant or recessive mode, with sporadic cases arising de novo. Despite recent important discoveries in the molecular pathogenesis of CE, the molecular causes remain to be identified in about 70% of the patients. With the objective of collecting all the published and unpublished cases of CE the COST action MPN&MPNr-Euronet developed a comprehensive Internet-based database focusing on the registration of clinical history, hematological, biochemical, and molecular data (http://www.erythrocytosis.org/). In addition, unreported mutations are also curated in the corresponding Leiden Open Variation Database. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractions of lipases with milk fat globule membrane monolayers using a Langmuir film balance
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg

in International Dairy Journal (2014), 35(1), 81-87

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See detailArbitres ou parties: Qui est le maître de l'arbitrage?
Caprasse, Olivier ULg

in Liber Amicorum Georges-Albert Dal - L'avocat (2014)

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See detailExplaining stakeholder involvement in social enterprise governance through resources and legitimacy
Huybrechts, Benjamin ULg; Mertens de Wilmars, Sybille ULg; Rijpens, Julie ULg

in Defourny, Jacques; Hulgard, Lars; Pestoff, Victor (Eds.) Social Enterprise and the Third Sector: Changing European Landscapes in a Comparative Perspective (2014)

In the continuity of stakeholder theory, much of the current literature on (corporate) governance and business ethics looks at how organizations involve their stakeholders at different decision-making ... [more ▼]

In the continuity of stakeholder theory, much of the current literature on (corporate) governance and business ethics looks at how organizations involve their stakeholders at different decision-making levels (Carroll 2004; Clarkson 1995; de Graaf & Herkströter 2007; Freeman & Reed 1983). According to Freeman (1984), stakeholders are ‘any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of an organization's purpose’ (148); typically: the owners, the managers, the workers, the volunteers, the financing bodies, the partners, the suppliers, the customers/beneficiaries, etc. A continuum of involvement can be highlighted, from the rather passive strategies (stakeholder information) to the more active ones (stakeholder representation). Among the latter, involvement or ‘cooptation’ of stakeholders in the governance structures such as the general assembly and the board of directors is increasingly presented as a strategy mirroring a long-term relationship between the organization and a particular stakeholder category (Mitchell et al. 1997). Traditionally, the owners are the category of stakeholders that is co-opted in the governance structures. Indeed, the power of decision is part of the property rights (Milgrom & Roberts 1992). It allows owners to ensure that the enterprise is run according to their own objectives. Thus, in for-profit enterprises, the investors are the owners and, as such, they have the right to decide. They exercise this right by their presence at the general assembly. But not all enterprises are investors-owned firms. In some enterprises, ownership is in the hand of other stakeholders, like in producer, consumer or worker cooperatives. Others, like nonprofit organizations, can even be seen as firms without owners (Hansmann 1996). This chapter raises the question of stakeholder involvement in social enterprises, which are ‘non-investor owned’ and can broadly be defined here as organizations pursuing social aims through their economic activity (Defourny 2001; Defourny & Nyssens 2006). In these organizations, the configuration of stakeholder involvement contrasts with that of for-profit businesses in at least two ways. First, social enterprises are more likely than other types of organizations to be set up through a process of collective entrepreneurship which often involves a diversity of actors who each have a ‘stake’ in the pursuit of one or several organizational missions (Defourny & Nyssens 2006; Haugh 2007; Petrella 2003). Second, social enterprises seem to have a stronger tendency to give a voice to the actors with whom they interact –i.e., to involve their beneficiaries, supporters, funders or partners within their governance structures (Campi et al. 2006; Huybrechts 2010; Münkner 2004; Rijpens 2010). They usually use legal forms that allow and encourage economic democracy by recognizing stakeholders other than investors the right to participate formally in the governance bodies. While, as suggested by Campi et al. (2006; 2012), the presence of multiple stakeholders observed in a number of social enterprises may be linked with the diverse goals pursued by these organizations, such presence –or absence– may be due to many factors which have no direct links with organizational goals. As suggested in this chapter, the organizational need for resources (in a broad sense) and the drive to conform to external expectations may be two key factors. In any case, the diversified patterns of stakeholder involvement in social enterprises confirm the need for a more comprehensive account of stakeholder involvement in these organizations. Although several attempts have been made to theorize stakeholder involvement in social enterprise governance, it is still a much under-researched topic. We believe that this research gap is due not only to the infancy stage in which social enterprise research is located, but also to a lack of connection and integration of this research within the broader study of organizations. Indeed, while new theoretical developments centered on the specific features of social enterprise are needed, these developments cannot be made independently from the knowledge built for more than a century regarding how organizations are structured and operate. This chapter aims to examine stakeholder involvement in social enterprise governance using two types of theoretical lenses each embodying a rich research tradition in organization theory. The first lens refers to strategy and examines organizations (in this case governance structures) in terms of their dependency on a set of resources. The second lens uses legitimacy arguments to explain organizational governance as a social construct located in a broader setting of social relationships. The first two sections will present each of these views and examine their contributions to understanding stakeholder involvement in the governance structures of social enterprises. Then, a comparative case study on work integration social enterprises will serve to illustrate how both research avenues can be combined so as to better grasp social enterprise governance as a complex and multi-dimensional practice. [less ▲]

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See detailPenser l'incertain
Vrancken, Didier ULg

Book published by Presses de l'Université Laval/Hermann (2014)

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See detailLigand and solvation effects on the structural and electronic properties of small gold clusters
Dufour, F.; Fresch, Barbara ULg; Durupthy, O. et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry C: Nanomaterials, Interfaces, and Hard Matter (2014), 118(8), 4362

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See detailNear-to-Surface properties affecting bond strength in concrete repair
Courard, Luc ULg; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Garbacz, Andrzej

in Cement and Concrete Composites (2014), 46

One of the main processes for repairing concrete structures is patch repair. Efficiency and durability of a repaired system depends on the bond between concrete substrate and repair material. By ... [more ▼]

One of the main processes for repairing concrete structures is patch repair. Efficiency and durability of a repaired system depends on the bond between concrete substrate and repair material. By increasing the surface roughness, the surface treatment of concrete substrate can promote mechanical interlocking that is one of the basic mechanisms of adhesion. Nevertheless, some problems may arise from “co-lateral” effects of the treatment, especially due to the development of microcracks inside the substrate. In the presented paper, the effect of concrete substrate surface preparation has been characterized by roughness measurement, description of microcracking in the near-to-surface layer and a pull-off cohesion test. After repair, pull-off bond strength has been evaluated. It is concluded that selection of a suitable surface treatment technique should be preceded by the analysis of its aggressiveness in relation to the concrete substrate strength. A procedure for bond strength estimation using multiple regression approach, based on parameters describing surface quality really generated from various roughening techniques, is then proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiovascular safety of strontium ranelate: real-life assessment in clinical practice.
Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2014), 25

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See detailAssessing the potential of an algorithm based on mean climatic data to predict wheat yield
Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Leemans, Vincent ULg; Ferrandis, Salvador et al

in Precision Agriculture (2014)

The real-time non-invasive determination of crop biomass and yield prediction is one of the major challenges in agriculture. An interesting approach lies in using process-based crop yield models in ... [more ▼]

The real-time non-invasive determination of crop biomass and yield prediction is one of the major challenges in agriculture. An interesting approach lies in using process-based crop yield models in combination with real-time monitoring of the input climatic data of these models, but unknown future weather remains the main obstacle to reliable yield prediction. Since accurate weather forecasts can be made only a short time in advance, much information can be derived from analyzing past weather data. This paper presents a methodology that addresses the problem of unknown future weather by using a daily mean climatic database, based exclusively on available past measurements. It involves building climate matrix ensembles, combining different time ranges of projected mean climate data and real measured weather data originating from the historical database or from real-time measurements performed in the field. Used as an input for the STICS crop model, the datasets thus computed were used to perform statistical within-season biomass and yield prediction. This work demonstrated that a reliable predictive delay of 3-4 weeks could be obtained. In combination with a local micrometeorological station that monitors climate data in real-time, the approach also enabled us to (i) predict potential yield at the local level, (ii) detect stress occurrence and (iii) quantify yield loss (or gain) drawing on real monitored climatic conditions of the previous few days. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Usutu virus in a bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) and a great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) in north-west Europe
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Marlier, Didier ULg; Tenner-Racz, Klara et al

in Veterinary Journal (2014), 199

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were ... [more ▼]

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were found 4 km from each other and 5 days apart in the Meuse Valley, Belgium. Non-suppurative encephalitis and mild degeneration and necrosis were identified in the brain and cerebellum, and Usutu virus antigen and RNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, respectively. The two cases reported here represent the most western distribution of clinical disease in birds due to Usutu virus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Dimethylsulfide Cycle in the Eutrophied Southern North Sea: A Model Study Integrating Phytoplankton and Bacterial Processes
Gypens, N; Borges, Alberto ULg; Speeckaert, Gaëlle ULg et al

in Plos One (2014), 9(1)(e85862 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085862),

We developed a module describing the dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) dynamics, including biological transformations by phytoplankton and bacteria, and physico-chemical ... [more ▼]

We developed a module describing the dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) dynamics, including biological transformations by phytoplankton and bacteria, and physico-chemical processes (including DMS air-sea exchange). This module was integrated in the MIRO ecological model and applied in a 0D frame in the Southern North Sea (SNS). The DMS(P) module is built on parameterizations derived from available knowledge on DMS(P) sources, transformations and sinks, and provides an explicit representation of bacterial activity in contrast to most of existing models that only include phytoplankton process (and abiotic transformations). The model is tested in a highly productive coastal ecosystem (the Belgian coastal zone, BCZ) dominated by diatoms and the Haptophyceae Phaeocystis, respectively low and high DMSP producers. On an annual basis, the particulate DMSP (DMSPp) production simulated in 1989 is mainly related to Phaeocystis colonies (78%) rather than diatoms (13%) and nanoflagellates (9%). Accordingly, sensitivity analysis shows that the model responds more to changes in the sulfur:carbon (S:C) quota and lyase yield of Phaeocystis. DMS originates equally from phytoplankton and bacterial DMSP-lyase activity and only 3% of the DMS is emitted to the atmosphere. Model analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of DMS emission towards the atmosphere to the description and parameterization of biological processes emphasizing the need of adequately representing in models both phytoplankton and bacterial processes affecting DMS(P) dynamics. This is particularly important in eutrophied coastal environments such as the SNS dominated by high non-diatom blooms and where empirical models developed from data-sets biased towards open ocean conditions do not satisfactorily predict the timing and amplitude of the DMS seasonal cycle. In order to predict future feedbacks of DMS emissions on climate, it is needed to account for hotspots of DMS emissions from coastal environments that, if eutrophied, are dominated not only by diatoms. [less ▲]

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See detailRobusimpact - Design report of the specimens for all the experimental analyses - Deliverable 4.1
Hoffman, Nadine; Kuhlmann, Ulrike; Huvelle, Clara ULg et al

Report (2014)

The present report focuses on the design of the experimental analysis that are going to be performed within the ROBUSTIMPACT project (Grant Agreement Number: RFSR-CT-2012-00029). The project focuses on ... [more ▼]

The present report focuses on the design of the experimental analysis that are going to be performed within the ROBUSTIMPACT project (Grant Agreement Number: RFSR-CT-2012-00029). The project focuses on the behavior of composite steel and concrete framed buildings against accidental actions. Within the project, several experimental analyses are going to be performed spanning from the local to the global behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailVers une Europe sans le nucléaire américain ?
Dumoulin, André ULg

in Sur, Serge (Ed.) Annuaire français de relations internationales (2014)

Article sur les scénarios autour de l'avenir des armes nucléaires américaines B-61 en Europe

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See detailLectures de La Reine Albemarle ou le dernier touriste. Ontologie, autobiographie, politique
Cormann, Grégory ULg

in Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (2014), 10(1),

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See detailSurprising causes of C5-carnitine false positive results in newborn screening.
BOEMER, François ULg; SCHOOS, Roland ULg; de HALLEUX, Virginie ULg et al

in Molecular genetics and metabolism (2014), 111(1), 52-4

During an 18-month period, we noticed an alarming increase of newborn screening false positivity rate in identifying isovaleric acidemia. In 50 of 50 newborns presenting elevated C5-carnitine, we ... [more ▼]

During an 18-month period, we noticed an alarming increase of newborn screening false positivity rate in identifying isovaleric acidemia. In 50 of 50 newborns presenting elevated C5-carnitine, we confirmed the presence of pivaloylcarnitine. Exogenous pivalate administration had been previously identified as the causal agent of this concern. No pivalic-ester prodrug is commercially available in Belgium, but pivalic derivates are also used in the cosmetic industry as emollient under the term "neopentanoate". We have identified neopentanoate-esters in a nipple-fissure unguent that was provided to young mothers. Ceasing distribution of this product hugely reduced the C5-carnitine false positivity rate. [less ▲]

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See detailRepresentations for Cross-task, Cross-object Grasp Transfer
Hjelm, Martin; Detry, Renaud ULg; Ek, Carl Henrik et al

in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2014)

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See detailLearning dextrous grasps that generalise to novel objects by combining hand and contact models
Kopicki, Marek; Detry, Renaud ULg; Schmidt, Florian et al

in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (2014)

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See detailConclusions
Dumoulin, André ULg

in Auvret-Finck, Josiane (Ed.) Vers une relance de la PSDC ? (2014)

Actes du colloque sur "Vers une relance de la Politique européenne de sécurité et de défense commune"

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See detailLe changement climatique et la gestion des risques et catastrophes
Ozer, Pierre ULg

Learning material (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (4 ULg)