Last 7 days
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhite Matter Changes in Comatose Survivors of Anoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparative Diffusion-Tensor Imaging Study
Van Der Eerden, Anke; Khalilzadeh, Omid; Perlbarg, Vincent et al

in Radiology (2014), 270

Purpose:To analyze white matter pathologic abnormalities by using diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging in a multicenter prospective cohort of comatose patients following cardiac arrest or traumatic brain injury ... [more ▼]

Purpose:To analyze white matter pathologic abnormalities by using diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging in a multicenter prospective cohort of comatose patients following cardiac arrest or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent from proxies and control subjects were obtained. DT imaging was performed 5–57 days after insult in 49 cardiac arrest and 40 TBI patients. To control for DT imaging–processing variability, patients’ values were normalized to those of 111 control subjects. Automated segmentation software calculated normalized axial diffusivity (λ1) and radial diffusivity (λ) in 19 predefined white matter regions of interest (ROIs). DT imaging variables were compared by using general linear modeling, and side-to-side Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. P values were corrected for multiple testing (Bonferroni). Results:In central white matter, λ1 differed from that in control subjects in six of seven TBI ROIs and five of seven cardiac arrest ROIs (all P < .01). The λ differed from that in control subjects in all ROIs in both patient groups (P < .01). In hemispheres, λ1 was decreased compared with that in control subjects in three of 12 TBI ROIs (P < .05) and nine of 12 cardiac arrest ROIs (P < .01). The λ was increased in all TBI ROIs (P < .01) and in seven of 12 cardiac arrest ROIs (P < .05). Cerebral hemisphere λ1 was lower in cardiac arrest than in TBI in six of 12 ROIs (P < .01), while λ was higher in TBI than in cardiac arrest in eight of 12 ROIs (P < .01). Diffusivity values were symmetrically distributed in cardiac arrest (P < .001 for side-to-side correlation) but not in TBI patients. Conclusion:DT imaging findings are consistent with the known predominance of cerebral hemisphere axonal injury in cardiac arrest and chiefly central myelin injury in TBI. This consistency supports the validity of DT imaging for differentiating axon and myelin damage in vivo in humans. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReliability and validity of a new French-language triage algorithm : the ELISA scale
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; GERARD, P et al

in Emergency Medicine Journal (2014), 31(2), 115-20

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (10 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInfiniment petits en économie
Bair, Jacques ULg; Henry, Valérie ULg

in Tangente, l'aventure mathématique (2014), 156

Depuis la création de l'analyse mathématique, principalement par Newton et Leibniz, les économistes ont découvert qu'ils pouvaient exploiter avec succès le concept mathématique d'infiniment petit dans ... [more ▼]

Depuis la création de l'analyse mathématique, principalement par Newton et Leibniz, les économistes ont découvert qu'ils pouvaient exploiter avec succès le concept mathématique d'infiniment petit dans leurs raisonnements. Dans cet article est donné un aperçu des premières apparitions de l'analyse infinitésimale en économie. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffective stress method to be used in beam finite elements to take local instabilities into account
Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg; Cowez, Baptiste; Gernay, Thomas ULg

in Proceedings of the 11th IAFSS Symposium (2014, February)

In the fire situation, Bernoulli beam finite elements are the workhorse used in numerical calculation model for simulating the behaviour of the structure. Such finite elements treat all sections as class ... [more ▼]

In the fire situation, Bernoulli beam finite elements are the workhorse used in numerical calculation model for simulating the behaviour of the structure. Such finite elements treat all sections as class 1 (stocky) sections whatever the slenderness of the plates that make the section, allowing the development of a full plastic stress distribution in the section which leads to complete plastic redistribution along the members in the structure. This type of element is thus not adapted for modeling structures that contain slender sections of class 2, 3 or 4. This document presents a new approach to take into account local instabilities in slender sections using beam finite elements. The new approach is based on an effective constitutive law of steel. The effective law is not symmetrical with respect to tension and compression because, in tension, the stress-strain relationship is not modified whereas, in compression, the stress-strain relationship is modified. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULg)
See detailDidactique du français langue étrangère
Defays, Jean-Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2014, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailLe professeur de langues au service de quelle interculturalité ?
Defays, Jean-Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2014, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQue peut le métalangage ? What can metalanguage do ?
Dondero, Maria Giulia ULg; Provenzano, François ULg; Klinkenberg, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Signata. Annales des Sémiotiques = Annals of Semiotics (2014), 4

In the social sciences, research that is conveyed in a display of technical language is not always seen in a good light. This is a trend particularly in semiotics. As a field of study, it has a reputation ... [more ▼]

In the social sciences, research that is conveyed in a display of technical language is not always seen in a good light. This is a trend particularly in semiotics. As a field of study, it has a reputation for eagerness to use semio-jargon at the worst, or at best, a reputation for walling itself off in a self-reflective meta-language. It is true that the best known and most cited treatise on structural semiotics, by Greimas and Courtés, was published as an Analytical Dictionary. And it is also true that Peirce's work is prodigiously crammed with terminological inventions and speculations. It would seem that in both cases, the quest for scientific rigor took precedence over elegance of expression and of so-called natural discourse. Nothing new under the sun, n'est-ce pas? They say that a courtesan under Louis XIV scandalized the Sun King's court by uttering a technical term in the king's bedchamber, which illustrates how far back the issue goes; it certainly didn't begin with the development of the academic study of signs. In issue 4 of Signata we would like to examine the various aspects of building the meta-language of semiotics. The intention is not to adopt a philological perspective, but to look at the issue of terminologies in current scientific epistemology. We will examine the diversity of the possible meta-languages (natural language versus technical language?), the influence of related disciplines (what implications do the borrowed terms from grammar, logic, mathematics, and so on have for semiotics?), the reasons — explicit or not — for the choices made, and the stylistic impacts of those choices. An inquiry of this sort could go in many directions. What follows is an open-ended, non-exhaustive enumeration: Semiotics: A special case? Is it actually true that the semiotic approach generates a more prolific meta-linguistic output than other disciplines? How and why? It would be interesting, for example, to do comparisons with these more or less related disciplines (linguistics, sociology, psychology, etc.), to assess whether their rapport with the meta-language might possibly be different, and the reasons for and effects of those differences. In these assessments, of course, there arises the issue of "natural language", which is so readily its own meta-language: Are there disciplines that reconcile themselves with this supposed naturalness without any detriment? An updated meta-language may be deemed as unavoidable for a discipline whose vocation is to generalize, which implies substantial modeling power. But what do we find in philosophy, which can be expressed without abandoning natural language, and which seems to incur less reproach for its jargon than semiotics? The archaeology of meta-languages Another line of inquiry would be of a genealogical nature: This would involve examining the theoretical justifications that underpin meta-language borrowings from this or that other discipline, at this or that other time in its history, and the repercussions, both stylistic and epistemological, of the trade in terminology. On this score, we note that classical structuralism has expressed itself to a great extent in a grammatical and more broadly linguistic language (actants, modalities, deixis, articulation, semes, etc.). But it is common knowledge that other approaches to semantic facts have favored the language of logic. And yet others have shown that it is both possible and effective to use language taken from geometry or optics. In addition to these, from the perspective of the primacy of perception, the language of the natural sciences must be included — particularly that of the neurosciences —, and the language of sensory forms from phenomenology. Whether one is helping oneself to terms like "isotopy" and "valence" from physics and chemistry or "topology" from mathematics, these are not innocent choices in a discipline that has blazed its trail through the social sciences. The epistemological influence of the meta-language. Without any doubt, herein lies the most complex, ambivalent issue. Firstly, when one adopts a meta-language, by definition one views the object of study as a language (whether it is the natural language or the language of images, or the language of social practices). Yet this operation is so laden with consequences that to enumerate them would be an impossible task. We will merely note that many theoretical categories and analytical tools seem to emerge directly from the choice of a particular meta-language and the distance dictated by it. Secondly, opting for one meta-language over another is ipso facto a choice of which explanatory form the analysis will use. It follows that working on the meta-language, far from being a deathly sterile activity, is a practice intended to generate the form the explanation will take (which is without any doubt a major issue in scientific discussion). But these two epistemological impacts of meta-language generation can trigger a great deal of discussion on what we might call "the adverse effects" of the chosen options. For example, if there is a consensus within a group on a particular meta-language (such as in Greimassian semiotics), it may become just a template to apply, simply a schema to project onto objects; but if it is an object of inquiry (such as in Peirce's work), it may yield an approach that is more theoretical than practical. Hence the question: Hasn't semiotics in fact been above all a field with a mix of applied and self-reflective approaches? And in any case, does it truly explain things when one supports a meta-language and seeks to apply it and think within its terms? For example, we might question whether the meta-linguistic power of semiotics hasn't made it a discipline that is quick to generalize, and kept it from focusing on the singularity of its objects. We might also question whether semiotic research isn't all too often more formal than substantial, both in the Hjelmselvian sense and the usual sense. Ultimately, even further up the line, one could debate the epistemological possibility of the meta-language itself — as the poststructuralist philosophies have done. Isn't the distinction between object language and meta-language actually a bit utopian in the natural languages, since it assumes that the terms completely lose their reflexivity? Lastly, we might question whether the meta-language as a theoretical tool doesn't entail more than just artless transparency, but also an effort to define the theory within a restrictive set of evidence. For example, to bring up the "semiotic square" presupposes that there is always a semiotic square that explains the basis of the discourse (in such a way that what was a working hypothesis could become a non-falsifiable theory). The socio-rhetorical effects of the meta-language Aside from the epistemological requirements, when technical terminology is reworked, this has impacts on the circulation of concepts and their appropriation by different groups, which then affects group members' recognition of one another and how they differentiate one group from another. The boundary drawn on a conceptual system by a terminological apparatus thus gives rise to corollary inclusion-exclusion repercussions that are not unimportant. There are fights over terminological legitimacy, whose foremost characteristic is actually that they are not formulated as such. Any meta-language also has impacts on the social aspects of thinking. This is especially true of the meta-language of semiotics, because, due to its dedication to generality and transposability, it must fully support deconstruction. On the other side of the coin, one can maintain that meta-language is to objects what bureaucracy is to communities: It is helpful in creating order and making distinctions, in establishing levels and empty slots, but the risk, then, is that it may become an end in itself that must be maintained and tended, and that it ultimately disallows acting and thinking in other ways. In the light of this rhetorical approach, finally, we will set down some things to consider on the manner in which semiotics talks to itself: Are "techno-speak" and "jargon" inevitable? Are "elegance" and "practicality" valid criteria for a meta-language? What impacts on the meta-language are due to the obligation we often have in semiotics to dialogue with those outside our field: Can/ should this influence the way semiotics is communicated? And what is the cost of this influence? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDe la réflexion à l’action : regard croisé transfrontalier d’une démarche de santé mentale
Fond-Harmant, Laurence; Absil, Gaëtan ULg

in Fond-Harmant, Laurence; Fond-Harmant, Laurence (Eds.) Prévention et promotion de la santé mentale : une alliance transfrontalière innovante (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (19 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe projet Interface Formation Insertion en prison: bilan d'un échange de bonnes pratiques
Megherbi, Salim ULg; Martin, Daniel; Pierson, Philippe et al

Report (2014)

Ce rapport constitue le rendu du projet Interface(s) Formation Insertion qui entendait se situer à l’articulation de la mission générale d’aide sociale aux détenus et de la mission particulière de ... [more ▼]

Ce rapport constitue le rendu du projet Interface(s) Formation Insertion qui entendait se situer à l’articulation de la mission générale d’aide sociale aux détenus et de la mission particulière de promotion des initiatives socioculturelles et de formation dans les prisons. Porté par l'ASBL Aide&Reclassement, le projet a réuni les ASBL Arpège-Prélude, la Funoc, la Touline, le Cefoc et Trempoline dans l'optique d'explorer et de rassembler des bonnes pratiques en matière de "formation sociale" en prison. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes modèles économiques du bioraffinage en région wallonne : de l'exploration des débouchés et des niches de marché aux stratégies de développement industriel
Richel, Aurore ULg

Conference (2014, February)

1) Acteurs de la bio-économie en Wallonie 2 Transition vers le bioraffinage de seconde génération ? Les grandes questions et éléments de réponse (Flux de matières premières ?, Technologies de conversion ... [more ▼]

1) Acteurs de la bio-économie en Wallonie 2 Transition vers le bioraffinage de seconde génération ? Les grandes questions et éléments de réponse (Flux de matières premières ?, Technologies de conversion ? Produits cibles et marchés ? Positionnement des acteurs académiques et privés sur la chaine de valeur ? 3) Flux de matières premières en Wallonie – Carte d’occupation des sols, inventaire du potentiel en biomasse pour le bioraffinage de seconde génération (biomasse agricole, forestière, coproduits des industries de transformation food et non-food) 4) Quel(s) produit(s) et quel(s) marché(s) ? Liste des 10 molécules d’intérêt pour la Wallonie, molécules à haute valeur ajoutée et marchés de niche, cibles actuelles des recherches académiques et industrielles 5) Stratégie wallonne en termes de bioraffinage de seconde génération – quelques exemples d’initiatives R&D privées et publiques 6) Conclusions [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIMPACT OF COVER CROP MANAGEMENT ON CROP PRODUCTION: A FIELD EXPERIMENT IN WALLONIA CONTEXT
Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg

Poster (2014, February)

Minimal soil tillage methods, crop rotation, cover crop and continuous plant residue cover are the main pillars of sustainable agriculture. Lower energy consumption, costs and time are some direct ... [more ▼]

Minimal soil tillage methods, crop rotation, cover crop and continuous plant residue cover are the main pillars of sustainable agriculture. Lower energy consumption, costs and time are some direct benefits in favor to the adaptation of this agriculture. This practices aims also directly at protecting the soil from wind and water erosion by covering the soil. Lower disruption of the soil aims at developping the micro- and macro-fauna activity that increases soil fertility and carbon and nitrogen sequestration in soils. Unfortunately, some of the great constraints to the adaptation of conservation agriculture remain weed management, fungal diseases and pest management, that has been shown to be a problem in non-ploughed fields. The aim of our study is to evaluate, on a same field (Wallonia context), contrasted tillage methods for managing the cover crop and the implantation of the main crop. The following measurements were taken: germination rate, root and shoot biomass development, root notation (size and shape), leaf area index and quality of harvested product. Preliminary results indicate that the different tillage methods did not have a significant impact on crop production or development. However changes in germination dynamics were observed, the reduced tillage inducing slower germination. Regarding weeds populations, some difference were observed in weed occurrences. Since a field exp [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailContre-culture
Dejasse, Erwin ULg

in Groensteen, Thierry (Ed.) Dictionnaire esthétique et thématique de la bande dessinée (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDevelopment of a colorimetric method for the dosage of OI- anions and I2 in aqueous media
Bafort, Françoise ULg; Barthelemy, Jean-Paul ULg; Parisi, Olivier ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 155-160

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (17 ULg)
See detailOrganization and Human Resource Management
Lisein, Olivier ULg

Learning material (2014)

Aiming at giving the students an overview of the main "Organization and Human Resources Management" practices, issues, and challenges, the "Organization and Human Resources Management" e-book is divided ... [more ▼]

Aiming at giving the students an overview of the main "Organization and Human Resources Management" practices, issues, and challenges, the "Organization and Human Resources Management" e-book is divided into 4 main chapters: 1. "Understanding the diversity of organizations" 2. "From organizational configurations to HRM models" 3. "HRM policies: internal and external consistencies" 4. "HR Function and HR Department" This e-book contains several complementary resources that will help the students in their learning process: 1. The e-book first contains in-depth explanations of the main usual "Organization Theory" notions as well as of the main current "Human Resources Management" challenges and issues. These explanations are completed by several syntheses (tables, figures, graphics, etc.) throughout the theoretical developments. 2. Videos and Podcasts are also used to introduce the content of each chapter as well as to offer complementary explanations on some key theoretical issues and complex concepts. 3. As well, students will find articles and references at the end of each chapter. This "reading portfolio" offers the students the opportunity to complete their knowledge and to deepen their understanding of the main theoretical concepts, through additional and complementary points of views. 4. Finally, several video case studies are presented throughout the theoretical explanations. These video case studies are not only practical illustrations of the concepts but are also a great opportunity for the students to concretely check out their understanding of the main theoretical concepts through real case analyses. To do so, each video case study is introduced by questions that guide the students in their watching of the videos and in their analyses of the case studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMagnetospheric Science Objectives of the Juno Mission
Bagenal, Fran; Adriani, A.; Allegrini, F. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2014)

In July 2016, NASA’s Juno mission becomes the first spacecraft to enter polar orbit of Jupiter and enture deep into unexplored polar territories of the magnetosphere. Focusing on these polar regions, we ... [more ▼]

In July 2016, NASA’s Juno mission becomes the first spacecraft to enter polar orbit of Jupiter and enture deep into unexplored polar territories of the magnetosphere. Focusing on these polar regions, we review current understanding of the structure and dynamics of the magnetosphere and summarize the outstanding issues. The Juno mission profile involves (a) a several-week approach from the dawn side of Jupiter’s magnetosphere, with an orbit-insertion maneuver on July 6, 2016; (b) a 107-day capture orbit, also on the dawn flank; and (c) a series of thirty 11-day science orbits with the spacecraft flying over Jupiter’s poles and ducking under the radiation belts. We show how Juno’s view of the magnetosphere evolves over the year of science orbits. The Juno spacecraft carries a range of instruments that take particles and fields measurements, remote sensing observations of auroral emissions at UV, visible, IR and radio wavelengths, and detect microwave emission from Jupiter’s radiation belts. We summarize how these Juno measurements address issues of auroral processes, microphysical plasma physics, ionosphere-magnetosphere and satellite-magnetosphere coupling, sources and sinks of plasma, the radiation belts, and the dynamics of the outer magnetosphere. To reach Jupiter, the Juno spacecraft passed close to the Earth on October 9, 2013, gaining the necessary energy to get to Jupiter. The Earth flyby provided an opportunity to test Juno’s instrumentation as well as take scientific data in the terrestrial magnetosphere, in conjunction with ground-based and Earth-orbiting assets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe PPNAD, une cause rare de syndrome de Cushing
Petignot, S; VROONEN, Laurent ULg; HAMOIR, Etienne ULg et al

in Abstract book - Symposium "Perspectives in Endocrinology" Congresses Highlights 2013:ECE Copenhagen, ENDO SF, SFE Paris (2014, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailReceptor expression in craniopharyngiomas causing tumor growth in pregnancy : case report and review of the literature
VROONEN, Laurent ULg; Tome Garcia, M; THIRY, Albert ULg et al

in Abstract book - Symposium "Perspectives in Endocrinology" Congresses Highlights 2013:ECE Copenhagen, ENDO SF, SFE Paris (2014, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombination of Genomic and Proteomic Approaches to Characterize the Symbiotic Population of the Banana Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Massart, Sébastien ULg et al

in Environmental Entomology (2014)

Aphids are known to live in symbiosis with speciÞc bacteria called endosymbionts that have positive or negative impacts on their hosts. In this study, six banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel ... [more ▼]

Aphids are known to live in symbiosis with speciÞc bacteria called endosymbionts that have positive or negative impacts on their hosts. In this study, six banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel) strains from various geographical origins (Gabon, Madagascar, and Burundi) were screened to determine their symbiotic content, using complementary genomic (16S rDNA sequencing and speciÞc polymerase chain reaction) and proteomic (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis coupled with protein identiÞcation by matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-ßight mass spectrometry) approaches. Despite the geographical heterogeneity, the combined methods allowed us to identify the same two symbionts in the six aphids strains tested: Buchnera aphidicola and Wolbachia. Although B. aphidicola is found in almost all aphid species, the systematic presence of Wolbachia in banana aphids is particularly interesting, as this bacterium usually has a low prevalence in aphid species. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Wolbachia sp. strain found in P. nigronervosa was very similar to the strain present in aphids of the genus Cinara, known to have developed a strong and long-term symbiotic association with Wolbachia. The high level of asexual reproduction in P. nigronervosa could be linked to the presence of Wolbachia, but its prevalence also suggests that this symbiotic bacterium could play a more essential role in its aphid host. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailPredicative Possession in Late Egyptian (with special attention to incipient grammaticalization processes)
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2014, February)

In this talk, I provide a description of the various types of constructions used for expressing clausal (‘predicative’) possession in Late Egyptian. The corpus is comprehensively defined to include both ... [more ▼]

In this talk, I provide a description of the various types of constructions used for expressing clausal (‘predicative’) possession in Late Egyptian. The corpus is comprehensively defined to include both literary and non-literary texts from the reign of Thutmose 3 (c. 1450 BC) down to abnormal hieratic texts (c. 600 BC), excluding most of the texts in Égyptien de tradition (i.e. purposely imitating various registers of EEg). The talk is structured in three sections that reflect both functional and structural features: (1) The adjectival predicate pattern or the marked expression of ownership; (2) The comitative strategy or the unmarked expression of possession; (3) Other types of predicative possession in Late Egyptian. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)