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See detailPrevalence of frailty in nursing home residents according to various diagnostic tools
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2015), 4(S1), 61

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See detailClinical components linked to sarcopenia: the sarcophage study
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Petermans, Jean ULg et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2015), 4(S1), 89

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See detailLattice dynamics in antimony and tellurium based phase-change materials
Simon, Ronnie Ernst ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

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See detailOn the disruptive potential of 3D printing
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Vigneron, Lara ULg

in Stokes, Elen (Ed.) Embedding and Governing New Technologies: A Regulatory, Ethical & Societal Perspective (2015)

Against the background of narratives fuelling big promises on the disruptive potential of 3D printing, this chapter seeks to describe a variety of contexts in which 3D printing technologies are expected ... [more ▼]

Against the background of narratives fuelling big promises on the disruptive potential of 3D printing, this chapter seeks to describe a variety of contexts in which 3D printing technologies are expected to emerge over the next 15 years and exert their so-called disruptive potential. In the section 2, we first provide a brief introduction to 3D printing and we explain how it actually works. Next, in section 3, we describe the paradigmatic change allowed by 3D printing in the industrial sector with a shift toward mass-customization. In particular, we focus on the biomedical sector (section 3.1.), which is an interesting case in point because of the important number of innovations and the growth of 3D printed biomedical parts, a trend which is expected to continue in the future. To account for the dramatic, transversal, and transformative potential that 3D printing has in that whole sector, we first concentrate on 3D printing of biomedical instruments and implants for patients (section 3.1.1.) and, second, on additive bio- manufacturing of human tissues and organs (section 3.1.2.). Then, in the subsequent section 4 we address the expectations raised by 3D printing to empowering users in non-industrial domains (e.g. in fabrication laboratories or with desktop 3D printers at home). In section 5, we turn to discussing the impact of 3D printing on the governance actors and we raise important issues for further research in the political economy of 3D printing technologies. The chapter posits that 3D printing, and its governance, are closely associated with more participatory means of manufacturing (and of decision- making, through various governance structures) – but that, as things currently stand, such openness and participation does not play out in practice. There is a distinction between the rhetoric and reality of 3D printing, as one might expect in the case of newly emerging technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailArtikelen van de 8e Anela Conferentie Toegepaste Taalwetenschap 2015
Bacchini, Sylvia; Van den Bogaerde, Beppie; Boogaard, Marianne et al

Book published by Eburon (2015)

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See detailBuilding the future of European sustainability governance: a critical self-reflexive approach to a participatory Technology Assessment exercise
Claisse, Frédéric ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Macq, Hadrien et al

Conference (2015)

Europe Wide Views (EWV) on Sustainable Consumption is a cross-European citizen consultation providing unique insights into the views of ordinary citizens across Europe on sustainable consumption and ... [more ▼]

Europe Wide Views (EWV) on Sustainable Consumption is a cross-European citizen consultation providing unique insights into the views of ordinary citizens across Europe on sustainable consumption and policies connected to this complex issue. The consultation took place simultaneously in 11 EU member states on October 25th 2014 and involved 1035 European citizens. Throughout the day, the participating citizens deliberated with fellow citizens and voted on issues relating to future policy-making on sustainable consumption. Overall, EWV was framed as a participatory Technology Assessment (pTA) exercise. Following the hypothesis that TA practitioners do not enough question the design of their projects’ and their own normative assumptions, we suggest to put the consultation we organised in Wallonia (Belgium) to the test. The aggregated results of the consultations point to the fact that “citizens are [now, after the EWV] strongly in favour of policy-makers taking ambitious steps in order to foster a more sustainable consumption in society, and want to personally take action in this process”. Relying on our previous work on dystopia as empowerment, we suggest a self-reflexive experiment to inquire into how much the design of the consultation (including the materials that were circulated) and the messages that we conveyed pictured a threatening present that would lead to an apocalyptic future ‘if nothing was done’, thereby potentially biasing the results that will are to be translated into political recommendations. Our analysis will benefit from cross-breeding future studies and science and technology studies to think afresh invisible normativities induced by pTA of sustainable governance. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat's next for Technology Assessment? Experiences and Insights from Wallonia, Belgium
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Conference (2015)

A video of the presentation can be watched here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wlzpru9y5v4&index=18&list=PLgQy-FbfhVz4apGHLDWWEesazyeCg3hUf

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See detailActores valorizando la ciencia en regimenes científicos estrategicos
Charlier, Nathan ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Conference (2015)

With the underlying hypothesis of a shift toward strategic or neoliberal science regimes, much work has been done to analyze the multiple transformations of science institutions and policies over the last ... [more ▼]

With the underlying hypothesis of a shift toward strategic or neoliberal science regimes, much work has been done to analyze the multiple transformations of science institutions and policies over the last decades (e.g. Mirowski and Sent 2008; Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004; Bruno, 2008). The trends towards privatization and commodification of science are undisputable but we argue that little attention has been paid so far to the various political conceptions of research and innovation (R&I) coexisting within strategic science regimes. Cognitive approaches to public policy already stressed the circular relationship between meaning and power (e.g. Muller and Surel, 1998; Roe, 1994), but strategic science has remained out of the scope of such analyses. Regarding R&I policies, this leads to different ways to conceive of the “value” of science, some related to preexisting institutions and narratives, and some branching out toward new cognitive resources to achieve politico-economic aims. In this article, we hypothesize the coexistence of at least four justificatory narratives which help structuring the representations and actions of scientists and policymakers when they address science as a political object: ‘science for the sake of science’, ‘science, the endless frontier (continued)’, ‘knowledge-based economy’ and ‘grand societal challenges’. Each one attributes a different value to science, proposes a specific organization for the R&I system, and addresses the relation with economy and society differently. In order to understand how these justificatory narratives are locally enacted, and thereby grounded in R&I policymaking, we analyze the political discourses on science of actors from biotechnology labs, university management boards, and science policy advisory boards in Wallonia, French-speaking Belgium. We find traces of every of the four ideal-typical narratives that we identified, either in almost “pure” versions or in hybridized forms. We conclude that these developments are part of the same multidirectional movement of re-contextualization of science in society and we attend to some of the implications induced. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological interpretation of the slope during an isokinetic fatigue test
Bosquet, L.; Gouadec, K.; Berryman, N. et al

in International Journal of Sports Medicine (2015)

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See detailRelation between global end-diastolic volume and left ventricular end-diastolic volume
Pironet, Antoine ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; Kamoi, S. et al

in Critical Care (2015), 19(Suppl 1), 175

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See detailTowards a full integration of optimization and validation phases: An Analytical-Quality-by-Design approach
Hubert, Cédric ULg; Houari, Sabah ULg; Rozet, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2015)

When using an analytical method, defining an Analytical Target Profile (ATP) focused on quantitative performance represents a key input, and this will drive the method development process. In this context ... [more ▼]

When using an analytical method, defining an Analytical Target Profile (ATP) focused on quantitative performance represents a key input, and this will drive the method development process. In this context, two case studies were selected in order to demonstrate the potential of a Quality-by-Design (QbD) strategy when applied to two specific phases of the method lifecycle: the pre-validation study and the validation step. The first case study focused on the improvement of a Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Mass Spectrometry (MS) stability-indicating method by the means of the QbD concept. The Design of Experiments (DoE) conducted during the optimization step (i.e. determination of the qualitative Design Space (DS)) was performed a posteriori. Additional experiments were performed in order to simultaneously conduct the pre-validation study to assist in defining the DoE to be conducted during the formal validation step. This predicted protocol was compared to the one used during the formal validation. A second case study based on the LC/MS-MS determination of glucosamine and galactosamine in human plasma was considered in order to illustrate an innovative strategy allowing the QbD methodology to be incorporated during the validation phase. An operational space, defined by the qualitative DS, was considered during the validation process rather than a specific set of working conditions as conventionally performed. Results of all the validation parameters conventionally studied were compared to those obtained with this innovative approach for glucosamine and galactosamine. Using this strategy, qualitative and quantitative information were obtained. Consequently, an analyst using this approach would be able to select with great confidence several working conditions within the operational space rather than a given condition for the routine use of the method. This innovative strategy combines both a learning process and a thorough assessment of the risk involved. [less ▲]

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See detailQuels medecins pour quelle medecine?
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(1), 1-4

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See detailLa vignette therapeutique de l'etudiant. Instaurer, surveiller et interrompre des traitements medicamenteux: un exercice pratique en vie reelle.
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(1), 49-53

Some patients are exposed to complex clinical situations, which impose a careful analysis of both the indications and contraindications of ongoing pharmacological treatments as well as of the dosing or ... [more ▼]

Some patients are exposed to complex clinical situations, which impose a careful analysis of both the indications and contraindications of ongoing pharmacological treatments as well as of the dosing or drug adjustments to be proposed. This article illustrates some problems encountered when a new drug therapy is initiated, when medications with narrow therapeutic window should be supervised and when some drugs should be stopped mainly for safety reasons. The clinical case relates the story of a patient with type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, who presents a congestive heart failure associated with an episode of atrial fibrillation and a severe renal insufficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailThe enfranchisement of citizens abroad: variations and explanations
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULg

in Democratization (2015)

Today, a large majority of states allow at least some of their emigrants to take part in home country elections from abroad. This article first looks at the diffusion of external voting laws and shows ... [more ▼]

Today, a large majority of states allow at least some of their emigrants to take part in home country elections from abroad. This article first looks at the diffusion of external voting laws and shows that over the past 25 years they have become widely-adopted and are no longer limited to specific professional categories of citizens. Second, the article explains the international diffusion of external voting by discussing the “norm- internationalization hypothesis” and the “electoral-competition hypothesis.” Third, the article attempts to demonstrate that these hypotheses cannot explain why, in a democratic context, states continue to implement a series of hurdles that deter emigrants from using their newly gained rights. Looking at recent developments in Latin America and the Middle East and North Africa, it concludes that the diffusion and variations of external voting laws result from transnational negotiation processes in a context of democratic transformation among various actors whose interests are strongly affected by the inclusion or exclusion of these new voters. [less ▲]

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See detailERRA-KIBRI, ŠABRA D’IDDIN-ILUM ET SES COLLEGUES
Colonna d'Istria, Laurent ULg; Beyer, Dominique

in Journal of Cuneiform Studies (2015), 67

In an article entitled “Wer war Tarâm-Mari?” K. Hecker (2008) published two private contracts from the Old Assyrian Karum II level at Kültepe-Kaniš (Kt m/k and Kt 102 m/171 k). These contracts bore the ... [more ▼]

In an article entitled “Wer war Tarâm-Mari?” K. Hecker (2008) published two private contracts from the Old Assyrian Karum II level at Kültepe-Kaniš (Kt m/k and Kt 102 m/171 k). These contracts bore the impression of the seal of someone who was a dependent of Iddin-Ilum, the ruler (šakkanakku) of the Syrian city of Mari. In this study we propose to read the name of the original owner of the seal as Erra-kibrī rather than as of Tarâm-Mari as had been previously proposed, and to identify him as a ŠABRA official. This seal also provides another example of representation of the goddess who wields a knife, one who occurs frequently on seals of ŠABRA’s and other officials during the reigns of Iddin-ilum and Isi-Dagan of Mari. [less ▲]

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See detailAvoiding misidentification of bands in planetary Raman spectra
Harris, Liam; McHugh, Melissa; Hutchinson, Ian B. et al

in Journal of Raman Spectroscopy (2015)

Raman spectroscopy has been identified as a powerful tool for astrobiology and remote robotic planetary exploration. It can be used to identify and characterise rock matrices, mineral inclusions and ... [more ▼]

Raman spectroscopy has been identified as a powerful tool for astrobiology and remote robotic planetary exploration. It can be used to identify and characterise rock matrices, mineral inclusions and organic molecules and is demonstrablyeffective at identifying biomarkers, or indicators of biological activity. The ExoMars rover, jointly operated by the European and Russian Federal Space Agencies, will carry the first Raman spectrometer into space when it launches in 2018 and two further Raman instruments have recently been announced as part of the payload onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Mars 2020 rover. Each of these spectrometers however will, by necessity, have poorer resolution than the most sophisticated laboratory instruments because of mass, volume and power constraints and the space readiness of the requisite technologies. As a result, it is important to understand the minimum instrument specification requiredto achieve the scientific objectives of a mission, in terms of parameters such as spectral resolution and laser footprint size. This requires knowledge of the target minerals and molecules between which there may be ambiguity when identifying bands in spectra from geological samples. Here, we present spectra from a number of Mars analogue samples that include a range of such molecules, highlighting where such confusion may occur and identifying the most useful bands for differentiation. It is recommended that a Ramanspectrometer achieves a resolution of at least 3 cm-1 and covers a spectral range from 100 to 4000 cm-1 in order to differentiate between all of the target molecules presented here. [less ▲]

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See detailConservation research presence protects: a case study of great ape abundance in the Dja region, Cameroon
Tagg, Nikki; Willie, Jacob; Duarte, Jesus et al

in Animal Conservation (2015)

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