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See detailThe TRAPPIST comet survey in 2014
Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Opitom, Cyrielle ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2014, November 01), 46

TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is ... [more ▼]

TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that has been installed in June 2010 at the ESO La Silla Observatory [1]. Operated from Liège (Belgium) it is devoted to the detection and characterisation of exoplanets and to the study of comets and other small bodies in the Solar System. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins filters. We describe here the hardware and the goals of the project. For relatively bright comets (V < 12) we measure several times a week the gaseous production rates (using a Haser model) and the spatial distribution of several species among which OH, NH, CN, C2 and C3 as well as ions like CO+. The dust production rates (Afrho) and color of the dust aredetermined through four dust continuum bands from the UV to the red (UC, BC, GC, RC filters). We will present the dust and gas production rates of the brightest comets observed in 2014: C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS), C/2014 E2 (Jacques), C/2013 A1 (Siding Springs) and C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden). Each of these comets have been observed at least once a week for several weeks to several months. Light curves with respect to the heliocentric distance will be presented and discussed. [1] Jehin et al., The Messenger, 145, 2-6, 2011.[2] Farnham et al., Icarus, 147, 180-204, 2000. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic fields in O stars
Nazé, Yaël ULg

in Mathys, Gauthier; Griffin, E.; Kochukhov, O. (Eds.) et al Putting A Stars into Context: Evolution, Environment, and Related Stars (2014, November 01)

During the last decade, large-scale, organized (generally dipolar) magnetic fields with strengths between 0.1 and 20 kG have been detected in dozens of OB stars. This contribution reviews the impact of ... [more ▼]

During the last decade, large-scale, organized (generally dipolar) magnetic fields with strengths between 0.1 and 20 kG have been detected in dozens of OB stars. This contribution reviews the impact of such fields on the stellar winds of O-type stars, with emphasis on variability and X-ray emission. [less ▲]

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See detailX-Ray Emission from Magnetic Massive Stars
Nazé, Yaël ULg; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie et al

in The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (2014), 215

Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of ... [more ▼]

Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ~60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower-{\dot{M}} B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher-{\dot{M}} O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres. Based on data collected with XMM-Newton and Chandra. [less ▲]

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See detailLe langage et l’homme
Dubuisson, Francois ULg

in Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique [En ligne] (2014), 10(11),

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See detailBuilding galaxies, stars, planets and the ingredients for life between the stars. The science behind the European Ultraviolet-Visible Observatory
Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Appourchaux, Thierry; Barstow, Martin A. et al

in Astrophysics and Space Science (2014), 354

This contribution gathers the contents of the white paper submitted by the UV community to the Call issued by the European Space Agency in March 2013, for the definition of the L2 and L3 missions in the ... [more ▼]

This contribution gathers the contents of the white paper submitted by the UV community to the Call issued by the European Space Agency in March 2013, for the definition of the L2 and L3 missions in the ESA science program. We outlined the key science that a large UV facility would make possible and the instrumentation to be implemented. The growth of luminous structures and the building blocks of life in the Universe began as primordial gas was processed in stars and mixed at galactic scales. The mechanisms responsible for this development are not well-understood and have changed over the intervening 13 billion years. To follow the evolution of matter over cosmic time, it is necessary to study the strongest (resonance) transitions of the most abundant species in the Universe. Most of them are in the ultraviolet (UV; 950 Å-3000 Å) spectral range that is unobservable from the ground. A versatile space observatory with UV sensitivity a factor of 50-100 greater than existing facilities will revolutionize our understanding of the Universe. Habitable planets grow in protostellar discs under ultraviolet irradiation, a by-product of the star-disk interaction that drives the physical and chemical evolution of discs and young planetary systems. The electronic transitions of the most abundant molecules are pumped by this UV field, providing unique diagnostics of the planet-forming environment that cannot be accessed from the ground. Earth's atmosphere is in constant interaction with the interplanetary medium and the solar UV radiation field. A 50-100 times improvement in sensitivity would enable the observation of the key atmospheric ingredients of Earth-like exoplanets (carbon, oxygen, ozone), provide crucial input for models of biologically active worlds outside the solar system, and provide the phenomenological baseline to understand the Earth atmosphere in context. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter’s polar auroral dynamics
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2014, November 01)

The morphology of Jupiter’s ultraviolet aurora is commonly described in terms of components located inside (poleward of) or outside (equatorward of) the main oval emission. These components may also be ... [more ▼]

The morphology of Jupiter’s ultraviolet aurora is commonly described in terms of components located inside (poleward of) or outside (equatorward of) the main oval emission. These components may also be discriminated by their temporal behaviour, where the narrowest parts of the main “oval” remain relatively stable over time periods of several hours, and the satellite footprints show large variability with timescales of minutes. Inside the main emission the so-called polar aurora, presumably corresponding to the polar cap mixing open and closed magnetic field lines, is characterized by rapid motions taking the form of swirls, giving rise to the “swirl region” and by intermittent brightenings in the “active region”. Coarse analysis of these motions suggests that they are too fast to respond to an equatorial magnetospheric forcing. Instead, they appear to be related to processes taking place in or above the ionosphere where distances travelled by plasma waves match those of the subtended auroral emission. Here, we present a preliminary improved analysis of the auroral motion in the polar region based on the application of an iterative “Advection Corrected Correlation Image Velocimetry” (ACCIV) method (Asay-Davis et al., 2009). This method allows one to build velocity fields quantifying local and overall auroral motions which may then be used to constrain their origin. [less ▲]

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See detailSearch for Satellite Effects on Saturn's Auroras in Cassini UVIS Data
Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, Larry; Jouchoux, Alain et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2014, November 01)

The Cassini UVIS has been obtaining Saturn auroral images since 2004. We have previously reported instances when the main auroral oval brightened briefly in a quasi-periodic fashion near the sub-Mimas ... [more ▼]

The Cassini UVIS has been obtaining Saturn auroral images since 2004. We have previously reported instances when the main auroral oval brightened briefly in a quasi-periodic fashion near the sub-Mimas longitude. Here we examine the large set of auroral images obtained from close range and high sub-spacecraft latitudes. We will plot the brightness of the individual auroral measurements as a function of local time, and as a function of the location of Mimas and other moons to test for any correlations. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse of Microchannel Plate (MCP) Detectors to MeV Electrons: Beamline tests in support of Juno, JUICE, and Europa Mission UVS instrument investigations
Retherford, Kurt D.; Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2014, November 01)

The response of Microchannel Plate (MCP) detectors to far-UV photons is excellent. MCPs provide a photon-counting capability that is especially useful for high-quality stellar and solar occultation ... [more ▼]

The response of Microchannel Plate (MCP) detectors to far-UV photons is excellent. MCPs provide a photon-counting capability that is especially useful for high-quality stellar and solar occultation measurements. However, use of MCPs within the Jovian magnetosphere for UV measurements is hampered by their ~30% detection efficiency to energetic electrons and ~1% efficiency to γ-rays. High-Z shielding stops energetic electrons, but creates numerous secondary particles; γ-rays are the most important of these for MCPs. These detected particles are a noise background to the measured far-UV photon signal, and at particularly intense times their combination can approach detector global count rates of ~500 kHz when operating at nominal HV levels. To address the challenges presented by the intense radiation environment experienced during Europa encounters we performed electron beam radiation testing of the Juno-UVS flight spare cross-delay line (XDL) MCP in June 2012 at MIT’s High Voltage Research Laboratory (HVRL), and again in Nov. 2013 adding an atomic-layer deposition (ALD) coated test-MCP, to measure the detection efficiency and pulse height distribution characteristics for energetic electrons and γ-rays. A key result from this UVS-dedicated SwRI IR&D project is a detailed characterization of our XDL’s response to both particles (electrons and γ-rays) and photons as a function of HV level. These results provide confidence that good science data quality is achievable when operating at Europa closest approach and/or in orbit. Comparisons with in-flight data obtained with New Horizons Pluto-Alice MeV electron response measurements at Jupiter (Steffl et al., JGR, 2012), LRO-LAMP electron and proton event data, and Juno-UVS Earth proton-belt flyby data, and recent bench tests with radioactive sources at Sensor Sciences increase this confidence. We present a description of the test setup, quantitative results, and several lessons learned to help inform future beamline test experiments dedicated to instrument developments for NASA's next large mission to Europa and ESA's JUICE mission to Ganymede. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparison of raters and disease assessment methods for estimating disease severity for purposes of hypothesis testing.
Bock, Clive; El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg; Kouadio, Louis et al

in Phytopathology (2014), 104(11), 26

Assessment of disease severity is most often made visually, and estimates can be inaccurate. Nearest percent estimates (NPEs) of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat by four raters (R1-R4 ... [more ▼]

Assessment of disease severity is most often made visually, and estimates can be inaccurate. Nearest percent estimates (NPEs) of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat by four raters (R1-R4) assessing non-treated (NT) and fungicide-treated (FT) plots were compared to true values using Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) on two dates in 2006 and 2007. Estimates were converted to Horsfall-Barratt (HB) mid-points and again compared for accuracy and precision. Estimates of severity from FT and NT plots were analyzed to ascertain effects of rater using both the NPE and HB values. Regardless of method, all raters showed a range of agreement with true values on FT and NT plots (ρc = 0 to 1). Use of the HB scale most often reduced agreement (84.4% of the time), and did not improve rater-associated bias of treatment mean severity estimates. Consequently, estimates of mean severity differed significantly among raters and from true values (F=126 to 1260, P=0.002 to<0.0001). However, a comparison of treatment effects showed that the true values and R1 to R4 all demonstrated significant effects of fungicide (F=101 to 1952, P=0.002 to <0.00001). Ranking of raters differed on one occasion when HB values were used. These results demonstrate the effect of the HB scale, and the need for accurate disease assessment to minimize over or underestimates compared to true severity so as to minimize the potential for type II errors. [less ▲]

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See detailDisease severity assessment in epidemiological studies: accuracy and reliability of visual estimates of Septoria leaf blotch (SLB) in winter wheat.
El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg; Kouadio, Louis; Mackels, Christophe et al

in Phytopathology (2014), 104(11), 37

The accuracy and reliability of visual assessments of SLB severity by raters (i.e. one plant pathologist with extensive experience and three other raters trained prior to field observations using standard ... [more ▼]

The accuracy and reliability of visual assessments of SLB severity by raters (i.e. one plant pathologist with extensive experience and three other raters trained prior to field observations using standard area diagrams and DISTRAIN) was determined by comparison with assumed actual values obtained by digital image analysis. Initially analyses were performed using SLB severity over the full 0-100% range; then, to explore error over short ranges of the 0-100% scale, the scale was divided into sequential 10%-increments based on the actual values. Lin’s concordance correlation (LCC) analysis demonstrated that all raters were accurate when compared over the whole severity range (LCC coefficient (ρc)= 0.92-0.99). However, agreement between actual and visual SLB severities was less good when compared over the short intervals of the 10×10% classes (ρc= -0.12-0.99), demonstrating that agreement will vary depending on the actual disease range over which it is compared. Inter-rater reliability between each pair of raters over the full 0-100% range (correlation analysis r= 0.970-0.992, P<0.0001), and inter-class correlation coefficient (ρ≥ 0.927) were very high. This study provides new insight into using a full range of actual disease severity vs limited ranges to ensure a realistic measure of rater accuracy and reliability, in addition to contributing to the ongoing debate on the use of visual disease estimates based on the 0-100% ratio scale for epidemiological research. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of rater bias on hypothesis testing when using different assessment methods for estimating disease severity.
CHIANG, KUO-SZU; Bock, Clive; El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg et al

in Phytopathology (2014), 104(11), 26

Bias (over and underestimates) in estimates of disease severity, and the impact of that inaccuracy on hypothesis testing using different disease scales was explored. Nearest percent estimates (NPE), the ... [more ▼]

Bias (over and underestimates) in estimates of disease severity, and the impact of that inaccuracy on hypothesis testing using different disease scales was explored. Nearest percent estimates (NPE), the Horsfall-Barratt (H-B) scale and four different linear category scales (5% and 10% increments, with and without additional grades at low severity) were compared. Actual values and estimates by 4 different raters of the severity (0 to 100%) of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat were used to develop distributions for a simulation model. The simulations were based on i) all the 4 raters data combined, ii) only the most accurate rater estimates, and iii) only the most biased rater. Regardless of the effect of rater ability, we found that, there were lower type II error rates with NPEs as compared with the other category scales at severities of 80 to 100%. On the other hand, with lower severities (0 to 20%), the 5% and 10% scales with additional grades had type II error rates comparable to those for the NPEs. Raters who overestimated severity and used the H-B scale had the highest risk of a type II error when the mean disease severity was low. Knowledge of how rater ability and scale type can affect hypothesis testing can be used to improve disease assessment as well as to provide a logical framework for developing standard area diagrams. [less ▲]

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See detailVizieR Online Data Catalog: Mixed modes in red giants (Mosser+, 2014)
Mosser, B.; Benomar, O.; Belkacem, K. et al

in VizieR Online Data Catalog (2014), 357

Seismic global parameters of the stars listed in the paper. Each star is identified with its KIC number (Kepler Input Catalog). The asymptotic frequency and period spacing are derived from the fit of the ... [more ▼]

Seismic global parameters of the stars listed in the paper. Each star is identified with its KIC number (Kepler Input Catalog). The asymptotic frequency and period spacing are derived from the fit of the radial and dipole oscillation modes. The stellar mass is derived from the seismic scaling relations. The evolutionary status is derived according to the location of the star in the DPi1 - Dnu diagram (Fig. 1) (1 data file). [less ▲]

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See detailInstrumental methods for professional and amateur collaborations in planetary astronomy
Mousis, O.; Hueso, R.; Beaulieu, J.-P. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014), 38

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which ... [more ▼]

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers are effective and regularly lead to scientific publications.We discuss the instruments, detectors, software and methodologies typically used by amateur astronomers to collect the scientific data in the different domains of interest. Amateur contributions to the monitoring of planets and interplanetary matter, characterization of asteroids and comets, as well as the determination of the physical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects and exoplanets are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope
Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2014, November 01), 46

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C ... [more ▼]

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON). </PRE></BODY></HTML> [less ▲]

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See detailCompte-rendu de l'ouvrage de D. Chancé & A. Ricard : Traductions postcoloniales
Oumarou Mal Mazou, Rachid ULg

in African Literature Today (2014), 32

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See detailTMS can selectively activate and condition two different sets of excitatory synaptic inputs to corticospinal neurons in humans
Sommer, Martin; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Cioccia, Matteo et al

Poster (2014, November)

Background: Current protocols or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induce mixed facilitatory and inhibitory effects. More selective, quasi-monophasic high-frequency stimulators now ... [more ▼]

Background: Current protocols or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induce mixed facilitatory and inhibitory effects. More selective, quasi-monophasic high-frequency stimulators now become available. We sought to investigate the impact of current direction and pulse width on intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) effects on human motor cortex excitability. Also, we estimated strength-duration time constants from motor threshold and input-output (IO) curves for PA and AP orientations. Methods: We stimulated the dominant hand representation of the motor cortex in 15 healthy subjects, using “unidirectional biphasic” pulses generated by a controllable TMS machine (cTMS-3, Rogue Resolutions Ltd., Cardiff, UK), connected to a standard figure-8 coil. iTBS was applied conventionally, using 20 sequences of 2 seconds iTBS (10 bursts at 5 Hz burst repetition frequency, each burst consisting of 3 pulses of 80 % AMT intensity repeated at 50 Hz frequency). In separate sessions pulses differing in current direction and shape were applied: a) posterio-anterior (PA) current direction in the brain, 75 μs (iTBS_PA75). b) AP current direction, 45 μs (iTBS_AP45). Before and for 30 minutes after iTBS, we monitored the modulation of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude from the dominant first dorsal interosseus using conventional, monophasic, suprathreshold pulses generated by a Magstim 2002 stimulator, inducing PA currents in the brain, at 0.2 Hz frequency. In an additional study on ten healthy subjects, we investigated the effect the two coil orientations with three different pulse widths (30, 60 and 120 μs) on the IO curve and the latency of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). Results: iTBS_AP45 yielded a pronounced and slightly delayed inhibition of MEP amplitude in all but one subjects, it was unrelated to the MEP latency differences. iTBS_PA75 had a variable and inconsistent effect that was in part related to the latency differenceAP-LM , in that long latency differences were correlated with the induction of inhibition rather than facilitation. We found a longer time constant for AP than PA orientation. MEP latencies yielded an interaction between pulse width and orientation, due mainly to longer onset latencies following AP stimuli of short duration. Conclusions: Current direction influences the outcome of iTBS, with a preference for AP currents. PA and AP stimuli activate the axons of neurones with different time constants. Those activated by AP pulses excite corticospinal outputs with a longer latency than those activated by PA pulses. AP pulses of short duration recruit long latency inputs most selectively. [less ▲]

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See detailEstetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury
Tskitishvili, Ekaterine ULg; Nisolle, Michelle ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

in Experimental Neurology (2014), 261

Estetrol (E4) is a recently described natural estrogen with four hydroxyl-groups that is synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver. It has important antioxidative activity. The aim ... [more ▼]

Estetrol (E4) is a recently described natural estrogen with four hydroxyl-groups that is synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver. It has important antioxidative activity. The aim of the present study was to define the importance of E4 in the attenuation of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Antioxidative effect of 650μM, 3.25mM and 6.5mM E4 on primary hippocampal cell cultures was studied before/after H202-induced oxidative stress. To examine oxidative stress and cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase activity and cell proliferation colorimetric assays were performed. To study the neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of E4 in vivo neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy model of 7-day-old newborn rat pups was used. The neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of estetrol before/after hypoxic-ischemic insult was studied in 1mg/kg/day, 5mg/kg/day, 10mg/kg/day, 50mg/kg/day E4 pretreated/treated groups and compared with the sham and the vehicle treated groups. The body temperature of the rat pups was examined along with their body and brain weights. Brains were studied at the level of the hippocampus and cortex. Intact cell counting and expressions of microtubule-associated protein-2, doublecortin and vascular-endothelial growth factor were evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemistry. ELISAs were performed on blood samples to detect concentrations of S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein as brain damage markers. This work reveals for the first time that E4 significantly decreases LDH activity and enhances cell proliferation in primary hippocampal neuronal cell cultures in vitro, and decreases the early gray matter loss and promotes neuro- and angiogenesis in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the dialysis membrane on the Vitamin D metabolims markers
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; DUBOIS, Bernard ULg; Urena, Pablo et al

Poster (2014, November)

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