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See detailImpact of cooking and species on intestinal fermentation patterns of vegetables in a humanized in vitro model of the gastro-intestinal tract
Kalala Bolokango, Gaetan ULg; Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Njeumen Lemotio, Georges Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2016, June 21)

Obesity and associated pathologies have dramatic consequences on patients’lives as well as high societal costs. Because of the role of intestinal dysbiosis and microbiota make-up on the pathogenesis of ... [more ▼]

Obesity and associated pathologies have dramatic consequences on patients’lives as well as high societal costs. Because of the role of intestinal dysbiosis and microbiota make-up on the pathogenesis of obesity, several strategies such as eating prebiotics and dietary fibre supplements are being investigated to reshape the intestinal microbial communities of obese patients. Beyond supplement, dietary fibre is supplied through plant ingredients in the meals. In the framework of the multidisciplinary research project Food4Gut, the use of vegetables rich in specific targeted dietary fiber, namely fructans, is being scrutinized for its ability to induce positive changes in the intestinal ecophysiology. Because expected effect might differ according the content in dietary fibre and fructans, the soluble:insoluble ratio, as well as the cooking of the vegetables, the fermentation patterns of several vegetables are being investigated in an dual in vitro model combining enzymatic hydrolysis to an in vitro fermentation step using faecal inoculums from humans, to evaluate the performance of gut microbiota, modulation of metabolic functions. Six vegetables were sampled in triplicates (N=3) and steamed for 20 to 30 min.: Jerusalem artichoke, salsify, asparagus, pumpkin, fennel and swede. They were chosen because they display a variety of contents in fructans, soluble (SDF) and insoluble dietaryfibre (IDF). Steamed vegetable samplesand burgers from local fast food restaurants (negative control) were hydrolyzed in vitro why porcine pepsin and pancreatin to mimic digestion in the upper gut and indigested fiber residues were recover using a 6kDa dialysis membrane.Subsequently, in vitro fermentation is being run with independent fecal inoculums from obese and lean patients (N=4). Fermentation kinetics over 24h as well as short-chain fatty acid production and profiles will be compared according to the individual donor and the vegetable species and multivariate analysis will be used to explore the relationships between donor, vegetable species and composition and fermentation patterns. [less ▲]

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See detailForest Inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: A Comparison of Static and Hand-Held Mobile Laser Scanning
Bauwens, Sébastien ULg; Bartholomeus, Harm; Calders, Kim et al

in Forests (2016), 7(6), 127

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract ... [more ▼]

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract forest attributes. The use of a mobile laser scanner (MLS) would reduce this occlusion. In this study, we assessed and compared a hand-held mobile laser scanner (HMLS) with two TLS approaches (single scan: SS, and multi scan: MS) for the estimation of several forest parameters in a wide range of forest types and structures. We found that SS is competitive to extract the ground surface of forest plots, while MS gives the best result to describe the upper part of the canopy. The whole cross-section at 1.3 m height is scanned for 91% of the trees (DBH > 10 cm) with the HMLS leading to the best results for DBH estimates (bias of 0.08 cm and RMSE of 1.11 cm), compared to no fully-scanned trees for SS and 42% fully-scanned trees for MS. Irregularities, such as bark roughness and non-circular cross-section may explain the negative bias encountered for all of the scanning approaches. The success of using MLS in forests will allow for 3D structure acquisition on a larger scale and in a time-efficient manner. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign criteria and experimental performance - Extended end-plate
Demonceau, Jean-François ULg

Conference (2016, June 21)

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See detailCryopreservation of cyanobacteria in the BCCM/ULC collection: experimental set-up of protocols
Crahay, Charlotte ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Day, John G et al

Conference (2016, June 21)

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See detailNatural radioactivity and elemental composition of sands in the Douala region, Littoral of Cameroon Using Portable XRF and HPGe detector
Guembou Shouop, Cébastien Joel ULg; Ndontchueng Moyo, Maurice; Chene, Grégoire ULg et al

Poster (2016, June 21)

Twenty four sand samples from seven sand quarries alone the Gulf of Guinea, Douala Littoral region of Cameroon, were analyzed using high purity germanium detector and a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF ... [more ▼]

Twenty four sand samples from seven sand quarries alone the Gulf of Guinea, Douala Littoral region of Cameroon, were analyzed using high purity germanium detector and a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. A comprehensive study was conducted to determine the natural radioactivity concentrations and the geological provenience of sand samples from seven different quarries sites of the Douala, a popular city, and its surroundings. The radioactivity investigation was performed by using high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From the measured gamma-spectra, the average activity concentrations were determined for 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 235U for a depth of 5–25 cm. Results of this study were compared to values from other locations around the world. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) measurements were performed for the quantitative elemental analysis of the sands, revealing the major, minor and trace elements present in the investigated samples. Reference marine and geological sample are used to check precision and accuracy of the equipment for major and minor components. From XRF experimental results it was possible to estimate the geological provenience of the analyzed sands. These data record the radioactivity background levels in sands and could be used as reference information in Cameroon. The comparison of major (Si, Al), minor (K, Ca,Fe), and trace (Ti, Mn, Zr, Rb, Sr) element ratios was made. The results indicate that the levels of Si and Al can be very helpful in subgroup definition and provide useful clues to the raw materials used for glassmaking in Cameroon. [less ▲]

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See detailRéinventer son enseignement : Pourquoi ? Comment ?
Poumay, Marianne ULg

Conference (2016, June 21)

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See detailQu'est-ce qu'une approche par les capacités ?
Orianne, Jean-François ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailOrganic Rankine cycle modelling and the ORCmKit library: analysis of R1234ze(Z) as drop-in replacement of R245fa for low-grade waste heat recovery
Davide, Ziviani; Dickes, Rémi ULg; Quoilin, Sylvain ULg et al

in Proceedings of ECOS 2016 (2016, June 20)

Due to the wide interest in organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) as a sustainable technology and the importance of numerical analyses and optimization procedures while considering such systems, we created a ... [more ▼]

Due to the wide interest in organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) as a sustainable technology and the importance of numerical analyses and optimization procedures while considering such systems, we created a dedicated open-source library named “ORC modelling Kit” (ORCmKit). The comprehensive library includes single com-ponents and overall models for subcritical, transcritical and supercritical ORCs. Three main programming environments are currently supported: Matlab, Python and EES (Engineering Equation Solver). A detailed steady-state cycle model of a small-scale regenerative ORC with a single-screw expander is used to evalu-ate the performance influence of R1234ze(Z) as a drop-in replacement of R245fa currently used in the instal-lation. The ORC system is used to recover low-grade waste heat with a temperature range between 90°C and 120°C. A thermal oil heater is used to simulate the heat source. A parametric study is carried out to in-vestigate the performance of the system throughout the range of interest in order to optimize the ORC with R1234ze(Z). [less ▲]

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See detailCdk1 is a critical mediator of ischemic/hypoxic neuronal death
Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg

Conference (2016, June 20)

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See detailNovel Methods for the Detection of Functional Brain Activity using 17O MRI
Möllenhoff, Klaus ULg

Doctoral thesis (2016)

Detailed quantitative information about metabolic processes plays a crucial role in the potential cure and for treatment of many diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or brain tumours. In the last decades ... [more ▼]

Detailed quantitative information about metabolic processes plays a crucial role in the potential cure and for treatment of many diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or brain tumours. In the last decades, radioactive tracers such as 15O have been used to quantify CMRO2 with PET imaging and this is regarded as the gold standard. However, such methods are complicated and expensive as a consequence of the short half-life (2 min) of 15O and inherently include radiation exposure and invasive measurements such as blood probes to probe cerebral blood flow (CBF). Fick’s principle of arteriovenous oxygen difference [1] connects CMRO2 and CBF via the measure of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The main goal of this work is to achieve non-invasive measures of OEF based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify CMRO2 allowing straightforward and comfortable patient handling. MRI enables studies of large cohorts of healthy volunteers due to noninvasive measurements and a lack of radioactivity. This can be achieved first by quantitative relaxation time mapping of the transverse relaxation time (T2) of venous blood only in proton (1H) MRI or by a measurement following inhalation of 17O gas and recording the signal curve of directly detected 17O signal. Unfortunately, the most abundant isotope of oxygen (16O) has a zero spin system, and cannot be detected with NMR experiments. In contrast, 17O, a stable isotope with a half-integer spin (I=5/2), can be detected by MR. Fortuitously, however, in MRI it is only visible in the form of metabolically generated H17 2 O and not as a gas. The low natural abundance of 17O, of only 0.037% (of the oxygen atoms) and the low NMR sensitivity (2.9% that of 1H) gives rise to the need for ultra-high-field MRI to reach a significant SNR per unit time. Natural abundance images of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in vivo after having gained written consent within a clinical trial of a 9.4T MRI system (Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) [2, 3]. These natural abundance images, which reflect the 17O bound to protons as H17 2 O and thus, the amount of water, are compared to 1H-based quantitative water content imaging. For further studies, the voxelwise knowledge of the quantitative water content is necessary to quantify CMRO2 based on the 17O signal behaviour. To achieve that, methods which were originally used on 1.5T scanners had to be adapted for the use at higher field strengths to overcome RF field inhomogeneities [4–11]. New correction methods were developed based on a well known correlation between tissue T1 and proton density (PD) to estimate the receive bias field properly. These methods were tested for quantitative water content determination. Averaged results in grey (GM) and white matter (WM) respectively of 10 healthy volunteers are H2OWM=70.3 1.4 %, H2OGM=84.7 1.5 %„ T1WM=918 24 ms and T1GM=1509 14 ms. Further, 1H-based imaging methods called QUIXOTIC [12–14] and TRUST [15] appeared in the literature. These methods are based on changes of the proton transverse relaxation rate T2 with different oxygen saturation levels. Quantitative values of venous blood T2 were acquired using a so-called T2prep module or a multi-echo spin echo readout. While the first method suffers from long acquisition times the latter one from large echo-spacing of the spin echoes and stimulated echo effects. Both disadvantages were overcome using an adiabatic multi-shot multi-echo spin echo sequence, which does not suffer from stimulated echo effects and due to the multi-shot capabilities, the echo-spacing is reduced [16]. Mean values in GM of four healthy volunteers are found to be venous oxygenation Yv=0.61 0.03, T2=54 4 ms, CMRO2=174 13 mol/100g min and CBF=53 3 ml/100g min. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular Alterations and Everolimus Efficacy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancers: Combined Exploratory Biomarker Analysis From BOLERO-1 and BOLERO-3.
Andre, Fabrice; Hurvitz, Sara; Fasolo, Angelica et al

in Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (2016), 34(18), 2115-24

PURPOSE: Two recent phase III trials, BOLERO-1 and BOLERO-3 (Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus), evaluated the addition of everolimus to trastuzumab and chemotherapy in human epidermal growth factor ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Two recent phase III trials, BOLERO-1 and BOLERO-3 (Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus), evaluated the addition of everolimus to trastuzumab and chemotherapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer. The current analysis aimed to identify biomarkers to predict the clinical efficacy of everolimus treatment. METHODS: Archival tumor samples from patients in BOLERO-1 and BOLERO-3 were analyzed using next-generation sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: Biomarker data were available for 549 patients. PIK3CA activating mutations and PTEN loss were reported in 30% and 16% of BOLERO-1 samples and in 32% and 12% of BOLERO-3 samples, respectively. PI3K pathway was hyperactive (PIK3CA mutations and/or PTEN loss and/or AKT1 mutation) in 47% of BOLERO-1 and 41% of BOLERO-3 samples. In both studies, differential progression-free survival (PFS) benefits of everolimus were consistently observed in patient subgroups defined by their PI3K pathway status. When analyzing combined data sets of both studies, everolimus was associated with a decreased hazard of progression in patients with PIK3CA mutations (hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.00), PTEN loss (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.96), or hyperactive PI3K pathway (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.93). Patients with wild-type PIK3CA (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.46), normal PTEN (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.26), or normal PI3K pathway activity (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.62) did not derive PFS benefit from everolimus. CONCLUSION: This analysis, although exploratory, suggests that patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer having tumors with PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, or hyperactive PI3K pathway could derive PFS benefit from everolimus. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003–2012)
Alexander, P.; Tedesco, M.; Schlegel, N-J et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2016), 10

Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future ... [more ▼]

Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. At these scales, processes responsible for mass change are less well understood and modeled, and could potentially play an important role in future GrIS mass change. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the January 2003–December 2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of −178.9 ± 4.4 and −239.4 ± 7.7 Gt yr−1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet-wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, some areas exhibit significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or processes not accounted for by models related to ice dynamics or hydrology, may lead to the observed differences. This highlights the need for further evaluation of modeled processes at regional and seasonal scales, and further study of ice sheet processes not accounted for, such as the role of subglacial hydrology in variations in glacial flow. [less ▲]

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See detailORCmKit: an open-source library for organic Rankine cycle modelling and analysis
Dickes, Rémi ULg; Ziviani, Davide; van den Broek, Martjin et al

in Proceedings of ECOS 2016 (2016, June 20)

As for many other technologies, modelling and simulation of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) are crucial for design, optimization and control purposes. However, model development is often time consuming and ... [more ▼]

As for many other technologies, modelling and simulation of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) are crucial for design, optimization and control purposes. However, model development is often time consuming and the scientific community lacks of open-access tools to study ORC systems. For these reasons, researchers from the universities of Liège and Ghent in Belgium gathered their knowledge and created “ORC modelling Kit” (ORCmKit), an open-source library dedicated to the steady-state simulation and analysis of organic Rankine cycles. Both component-level and cycle-level models are provided and different ORC architectures can be simulated. For each of the main component of ORC systems, different models are available with increasing complexity which allows a wide range of modelling possibilities. In order to remain general and accessible to as many people as possible, three widely used programming languages are covered within ORCmKit, i.e. Matlab, Python and EES (Engineering Equation Solver). Besides source codes, ORCmKit also includes calibration tools for empirical and semi-empirical models as well as a complete documentation for ease of use. [less ▲]

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See detailPlace of customary rights mapping initiatives in conservation policies
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Karsenty, Alain

Conference (2016, June 20)

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See detailInfluence of frugivore taxa on the generation of plant recruitment foci and on the composition of plant recruits’ communities
Trolliet, Franck ULg; Forget, Pierre-Michel; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

Conference (2016, June 20)

Frugivores can disperse seeds in a spatially contagious pattern and generate recruitment foci (e.g. under fruiting trees). This process is increasingly explored to understand the influence of frugivores ... [more ▼]

Frugivores can disperse seeds in a spatially contagious pattern and generate recruitment foci (e.g. under fruiting trees). This process is increasingly explored to understand the influence of frugivores on the spatial organization of plant communities, and can also serve as a method to efficiently monitor the consequences of animal extirpation. However, there is limited evidence contrasting the influence of different frugivores taxa on the creation of recruitment foci under fruiting trees, and, similarly, on the overall composition of plant communities. Here, we aimed (i) to compare the role of hornbills and primates in creating recruitment foci, and (ii) to investigate how the presence of hornbills, primates and elephants influence the overall composition of plant recruit’s community in an anthropized forest-savanna mosaic in DR Congo. We firstly compared the community of recruits (0.5-2 m high) in 25-m² plots below hornbill-dispersed trees (Staudtia kamerunensis, N=32), primate-dispersed trees (Dialium spp., N=26), and in control plots located below other tree species (N= 4900 m²). Secondly, we considered all plots to compare the community of recruits in five sites characterized by contrasted levels of hunting and housing different seed disperser communities. Our preliminary results indicate (i) communities of recruits below hornbill-dispersed trees are significantly more dense and richer than in control plots, unlike these below primate-dispersed trees. Also, (ii) recruits in sites less affected by hunting, housing more large frugivores, including elephants, tend to belong to species with longer seeds. We conclude that hornbills generate recruitment foci under fruiting trees, which can serve as an efficient tool to monitor the ecological consequences of their extirpation. Moreover, we discuss the potential influence of the different studied frugivore taxa and the risk of their extirpation from afro-tropical forests on the composition of plant recruits’ community. [less ▲]

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See detailA stochastic 3-Scale approach to study the thermomechanical damping of MEMS
Wu, Ling ULg; Lucas, Vincent ULg; Nguyen, Van Dung ULg et al

Scientific conference (2016, June 20)

A stochastic 3-scale approach is developed to study the thermo-elastic quality factor (Q) of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. Thermo-elastic damping is one of the major dissipation ... [more ▼]

A stochastic 3-scale approach is developed to study the thermo-elastic quality factor (Q) of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. Thermo-elastic damping is one of the major dissipation mechanisms in high-Q micro-resonators, which may have detrimental effects on the quality factor, and has to be predicted accurately. Since material uncertainties are inherent to and unavoidable in MEMS, the effects of those variations have to be considered in the numerical models. To this end, a coupled thermo-mechanical stochastic 3-scale approach is considered. Thermo-mechanical micro-models of poly-silicon materials are used to represent micro-structure realizations. A computational stochastic homogenization procedure is then applied on these statistical volume elements to obtain the probabilistic distribution of the elasticity tensor, thermal expansion and conductivity tensors at the meso-scale. Spatially correlated meso-scale random fields are then generated in order to represent the probabilistic behavior of the homogenized material properties, feeding macro-scale stochastic finite element simulations. [less ▲]

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