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See detailMarty and the 4th Logical Investigation: What is the disagreement really about?
Seron, Denis ULg

Conference (2014, December 13)

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See detailBelowground Chemical Ecology: The Case of Wireworms
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2014, December 13)

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See detailDetection of rRNA synthesis sites within reptilian nucleoli
Bartholomé, Odile ULg; Thiry, Marc ULg; Franck, Claire

Poster (2014, December 13)

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See detailLiquidity patterns on the US corporate bond market
Heck, Stéphanie ULg; Margaritis, Dimitri; Muller, Aline ULg

Conference (2014, December 13)

Liquidity commonality exists and empirical evidence (e.g. Lin et al., 2011) indicates that exposure to this common liquidity factor is priced in the cross-section of corporate bonds. The existence of ... [more ▼]

Liquidity commonality exists and empirical evidence (e.g. Lin et al., 2011) indicates that exposure to this common liquidity factor is priced in the cross-section of corporate bonds. The existence of commonality implies that part of a bond’s illiquidity is left as idiosyncratic. In this paper, we study how illiquidity components explain the cross-section of bond yields and how this relationship varies over time and across bond categories. We use a factor decomposition to break down total illiquidity into a common and an idiosyncratic component and analyze how yields relate differentially to each of these two components. We find that a bond’s idiosyncratic illiquidity is important, which might reflect informational asymmetries compounded by the lack of diversification in the institutional investors’ portfolios. Moreover, the relation between illiquidity and yield spreads appears to be negative during the recent crisis period. [less ▲]

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See detailNew technologies in conservation: monitoring African wildlife with UAS
Linchant, Julie ULg; Semeki, Jean; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2014, December 13)

In the vast protected areas of Africa, traditional wildlife surveys performed by plane or foot are logistically difficult to implement due to the lack of means and appropriate materials. Moreover, the ... [more ▼]

In the vast protected areas of Africa, traditional wildlife surveys performed by plane or foot are logistically difficult to implement due to the lack of means and appropriate materials. Moreover, the possibilities of encountering poachers in the field pose a serious risk to the monitoring teams. Over the last decade, civilian UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) boomed in natural resource monitoring. One of the biggest challenges of the UAS is to replace traditional wildlife censuses for the application of wildlife conservation. Parameters have to be approached in a different way than before. We performed test flights in the open savannah of the Garamba National Park during the wet season using the Falcon Unmanned UAS. Both photos (Sony Nex7, 24Mp) and videos, including thermal infrared videos (Tamarisk 640x480), have been used. Flight altitude ranged from 50 to 200m and pictures showed that animals can be effectively detected at 100m. We spotted elephants, hippopotamus and buffaloes as well as other smaller species such as hartebeests, kobs and warthogs. Thermal videos gave medium quality results during the day due to the heat but performed well during the night. The limited range and endurance of the UAS suggest a rethink of the usual census protocols. We therefore tested new flight plans in a rosette shape to take advantage of the higher points in the park, with transects having the length of the maximal range. Twelve transects of 10km can be covered in half a day with pictures covering a 15.6km² area. Human activities could also be detected. Pictures showed areas burned by poachers and the thermal infrared camera allows the detection of fires from a high altitude. Future developments need to be investigated such as automatic detection to review the huge amount of data collected and statistical methods must be adapted to those challenging situations. [less ▲]

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See detailPolyplex based on polycarbonate polymers for an efficient delivery of HDAC5 and HDAC7 siRNA
Frère, Antoine ULg; Evrard, Brigitte ULg; Mespouille, Laetitia et al

Conference (2014, December 12)

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See detailL’antithèse de la psychopathologie : à propos d’un inexistant
Englebert, Jérôme ULg

Scientific conference (2014, December 12)

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See detailImpact of goldfish on terrestrial and aquatic microhabitat use in the palmate newt
Darnet, Elodie; Winandy, Laurane ULg; Denoël, Mathieu ULg

Poster (2014, December 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (21 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpatial variation in the concentrations of mercury and persistent organic pollutants in free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from South Florida.
Damseaux, France; Kiszka, Jeremy; Heithaus et al

Poster (2014, December 12)

The bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is an abundant apex predator found in nearshore waters of South Florida, especially in the Lower Florida Keys (Key West) and the coastal waters of Everglades ... [more ▼]

The bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is an abundant apex predator found in nearshore waters of South Florida, especially in the Lower Florida Keys (Key West) and the coastal waters of Everglades National Park (ENP). The objective of this study was to assess variation in contamination levels of total mercury (T-Hg) and persistent organic pollutants (NDL-PCBs, PBDEs, DDT, HCH, HCB, PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs) in bottlenose dolphins found offshore of the densely populated Key West (n = 27) and from undeveloped ENP (n = 20). [less ▲]

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See detailFunambulisme, prudence et ruse. Analyse du contexte de travail des directeurs de prison en Belgique
Dubois, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2014, December 12)

Cette contribution à l’analyse sociologique du travail des directeurs de prison éclaire tout d’abord le fondement de ce métier : la gestion de la détention. Présentée comme "individualisée ... [more ▼]

Cette contribution à l’analyse sociologique du travail des directeurs de prison éclaire tout d’abord le fondement de ce métier : la gestion de la détention. Présentée comme "individualisée/individualisante" dans les discours politique, la gestion de la détention s'exerce toutefois dans des contextes de travail bureaucratisés (que l'on pense à la gestion du personnel, à la gestion logistique, à la gestion comptable ou à la gestion stratégique), composés de diverses scènes d’interaction (organisationnelle, politique, associative, administrative, judiciaire, interministérielle) et marqués par les « référentiels » (Muller, 2000) de judiciarisation et de managérialisation du secteur public. L’étude du travail des directeurs de prison met ensuite en lumière trois mécanismes de régulation des établissements pénitentiaires : le pouvoir des [chefs] surveillants au centre d’une « régulation autonome » (Reynaud, 1988) ; la multi-dépendance inter-organisationnelle des prisons éprouvée quotidiennement par les directeurs au centre d’une « régulation croisée » (Crozier et Thoenig, 1975) ; l’articulation ponctuelle et « prudente » (Champy, 2012), par les directeurs, des contraintes et des opportunités inhérentes aux différentes scènes sur lesquelles ils interagissent. L'analyse de certaines situations concrètes révèle enfin que le travail des directeurs n’est pas seulement technique (sur les plans juridiques et administratifs) mais aussi politique: il requiert une hiérarchisation des valeurs ou des finalités poursuivies dans leur activité. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid morphological change of barbels (Cyprinidae) after the dry-up of Sahara
Brahimi, Amina; Tarai, Nacer; Libois, Roland ULg

Poster (2014, December 12)

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See detailAnalphabétisme secondaire, raison cynique et la culture pour tous.
Hamers, Jérémy ULg

Conference (2014, December 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 ULg)
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See detailShedding light on two unstudied species of Lepilemur in Northwest Madagascar
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C.; Schwitzer, Christoph et al

Poster (2014, December 12)

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See detailCo-evolution of the parasitic fungi Pneumocystis and their Muridae rodent hosts in Southeast Asia
Latinne, Alice ULg; Bezé, François; Morand, Serge et al

Conference (2014, December 12)

Pneumocystis species are opportunistic and airborne-transmitted fungi that infect the lungs of numerous mammalian species. These highly diversified fungi are characterized by strong host specificity ... [more ▼]

Pneumocystis species are opportunistic and airborne-transmitted fungi that infect the lungs of numerous mammalian species. These highly diversified fungi are characterized by strong host specificity, probably associated with co-speciation. In this study, we investigate the Pneumocystis genetic diversity and infection rate in Muridae rodents of Southeast Asia in relation to environmental habitats. A total of 445 wild rodents belonging to 18 Southeast Asian Muridae species were tested for the presence of Pneumocystis in their lungs through PCR amplification of two Pneumocystis mitochondrial genes (mtLSU rRNA and mtSSU rRNA). Pneumocystis DNA was detected in 215 (48.3%) out of these 445 rodents. Eight highly divergent Pneumocystis lineages were retrieved in our phylogenetic tree. Three of these lineages correspond to the described species Pneumocystis murina (infecting Mus species), P. carinii (infecting Rattus species) and P. wakefieldiae (also infecting Rattus species). Three individuals belonging to Rattus norvegicus were found co-infected by both P. carinii and P. wakefieldiae. The five remaining lineages may correspond to several new undescribed Pneumocystis species and infect the lungs of Cannomys (lineage 1), Bandicota (lineage 2), Berylmys (lineage 3), Rattus (lineage 4) and Maxomys, Niviventer and Leopoldamys (lineage 5) Muridae genera. The congruence between phylogenies of Pneumocystis and their rodent hosts has been tested using co-phylogenetic analyses and the number of inferred co-speciation events is significantly greater than expected by chance. Rodent species, age and sex have no influence on the Pneumocystis infection rate among Muridae rodents but individuals trapped close to human settlements in patchy habitat were more likely infected by Pneumocystis parasites. [less ▲]

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See detailNegations in Late Egyptian: the general trends. A functional and typological perspective
Winand, Jean ULg

Conference (2014, December 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULg)
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See detailColonization of a new habitat by copepods: An in situ experiment
Mascart, Thibaud ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Biondo, Renzo ULg et al

Conference (2014, December 12)

Colonization of new habitats by a biological community is conspicuous and this dynamic process is one of the architectural forces of the biogeographical distribution we know today. Within the meiofauna ... [more ▼]

Colonization of new habitats by a biological community is conspicuous and this dynamic process is one of the architectural forces of the biogeographical distribution we know today. Within the meiofauna (<1mm), copepods (Crustacea) have successfully adapted to nearly every ecosystem and heir colonization power of permanent habitats is therefore well-established. However, few studies tackled the colonization of new naturally occurring provisional habitats, which are of ecological interest since they are rich in organic material, structurally complex and devoted of native fauna. Hence, the present study investigated the copepod colonization of provisional macrophytodetritus (mainly composed of senescent leaves and drift macroalgae) accumulated on bare sand patches inside a Mediterranean Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadow. General motive of colonization such as food and shelter are well-defined. However, little is known regarding the mode of the colonization and source pool of the associated colonists. Here, an in situ experiment was deployed in order to understand the mode of copepod’s colonization to fauna deprived macrophytodetritus. The objectives were: (1) assessing the adjacent colonist’s source pool (i.e. sediment, water column or P. oceanica canopy), (2) investigating the speed of settlement and (3) quantifying the species composition of the colonizing copepods. In summary: (1) species from every source pool actively colonized the macrophytodetritus through the water column and through the sediment-macrophytodetritus interface. (2) The initial settlement occurred within the first 24 hours. (3) The species composition showed to be different than the source’s composition. After 24h, the composition was similar to 45% of the P. oceanica, 28% of the water column and 25% of the sediments. After 96h, the composition was similar to 24% of the P. oceanica, 13% of the water column and 10% of the sediments. Indicating an evolution towards a macrophytodetritus copepod specific community composed of a mixture of the adjacent habitats first colonizers. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring the Effect of Stochastic Perturbation Component in Cellular Automata Urban Growth Model
El Saeid Mustafa, Ahmed Mohamed ULg; Saadi, Ismaïl ULg; Cools, Mario ULg et al

in Procedia Environmental Sciences (2014), 22(Winter), 156168

Urban environments are complex dynamic systems whose prediction of the future states cannot exclusively rely on deterministic rules. Although several studies on urban growth were carried out using ... [more ▼]

Urban environments are complex dynamic systems whose prediction of the future states cannot exclusively rely on deterministic rules. Although several studies on urban growth were carried out using different modelling approaches, the measurement of uncertainties was commonly neglected in these studies. This paper investigates the effect of uncertainty in urban growth models by introducing a stochastic perturbation method. A cellular automaton is used to simulate predicted urban growth. The effect of stochastic perturbation is addressed by comparing series of urban growth simulations based on different degree of stochastic perturbation randomness with the original urban growth simulation, obtained with the sole cellular automata neighbouring effects. These simulations are evaluated using cell-to-cell location agreement and a number of spatial metrics. The model framework has been applied to the Ourthe river basin in Belgium. The results show that the accuracy of the model is increased by introducing a stochastic perturbation component with a limited degree of randomness, in the cellular automata urban growth model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 213 (93 ULg)