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See detailPonti, Gio
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailDeganello, Paolo
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailNizzoli, Marcello
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailPesce, Gaetano
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailA Spatiotemporal Analysis of Membership: Formalizing the Space-Time Elements of Connection for Groups
Hallot, Pierre ULg; Stewart, Kathleen

in Proceedings of the AAG Annual Meeting (in press)

This research aims to formalize the spatiotemporal relationships of membership between individuals and the groups to which they belong. Specifically, we analyze how the membership to a community evolves ... [more ▼]

This research aims to formalize the spatiotemporal relationships of membership between individuals and the groups to which they belong. Specifically, we analyze how the membership to a community evolves over time considering past, present and future connections. The framework developed for this research is presented using an ontological approach. We demonstrate a specific domain ontology application for spatiotemporal membership using BFO2, an updated version of the Basic Formal Ontology. Key to this work is the representation of membership, modeled through different kinds of mereological relations possible with a group, for example, pre-member, active member, and alumni that capture how membership evolves and changes over time. The semantic web rule language (SWRL) is used to express the different spatiotemporal events that relate to membership and their consequences on membership such as subscription, graduation and reunion events. Mobility events are also included in the model. SWRL supports reasoning using the ontology and studying the evolution of membership between people and their various groups. We use the environment of a university community as an exemplar to develop and test the formalizations. However, the ideas are generalizable to a wide range of spatiotemporal domains, for example, these ideas hold for citizenship modeling or for consumers shopping at certain retail chains. The study of the evolution of membership connections between these entities and groups lends important insights for many different kinds of event planning. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiscale variability of amphipod assemblages in Posidonia oceanica meadows
Sturaro, Nicolas ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Vermeulen, Simon et al

in Journal of Sea Research (in press)

The study of spatial patterns is of ecological importance in order to understand the causes of the distribution and abundance of organisms, and it also provides valuable basis for management and ... [more ▼]

The study of spatial patterns is of ecological importance in order to understand the causes of the distribution and abundance of organisms, and it also provides valuable basis for management and conservation. Amphipod crustaceans are key organisms in seagrass ecosystems. However, little attention has been paid to the spatial scales at which amphipod assemblages may vary. We examined variability patterns of amphipod populations inhabiting Posidonia oceanica meadows, over spatial scales spanning four orders of magnitude (1 to 1000 metres) and for two consecutive years. This study reports the scales that contributed most to spatial variation of amphipod assemblages and explores the potential processes of the observed patterns, with particular emphasis on habitat features. The number of species, the diversity and the density of some species, exhibited high variation across years. Most species showed the highest spatial variation in density and biomass at small scales (~1 and 10 m). Based on density data, the structure of amphipod assemblages did not differ at any scales investigated. The patchiness that occurred at small scales may have been only weakly related to habitat features. Instead, we postulated that behavioural processes of amphipods were likely good explanatory factors. Although, the small scale spatial variability can be an important feature of amphipod assemblages in P. oceanica meadows, many patterns probably remained undetected as they may occur at scales smaller than those investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailGreek and Latin in the Roman World (100 to 700 AD)
Rochette, Bruno ULg

in Cambridge History of Later Latin Literature (in press)

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See detail(Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

Book published by Presses Universitaires de Liège (in press)

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See detailNarrating tradition: the emergence of the monumental Triumph Scene at Thebes
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

in Gillen, Todd Jonathan (Ed.) (Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt (in press)

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See detailIntroduction: (Re)productive Traditions, Cultural Transmission and Egyptology
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

in Gillen, Todd Jonathan (Ed.) (Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt (in press)

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See detailBesoins psychosociaux et perception d'iniquité: combinaison de méthodes d'action pour venir en aide aux conjoints de patients atteints d'un cancer - Une étude pilote
Wagener, Aurélie ULg; Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Jonius, Bénédicte et al

in Journal de Thérapie Comportementale et Cognitive (in press)

Cancer is a chronic illness that impacts both patients and family members. Spouses will often take on a caregiver role, meeting psychosocial needs such as health professional needs and information needs ... [more ▼]

Cancer is a chronic illness that impacts both patients and family members. Spouses will often take on a caregiver role, meeting psychosocial needs such as health professional needs and information needs. This caregiver role can also create emotional distress. Moreover, spouses might experience perceived inequity characterized by a combination of feelings of overinvestment and of underbenefit. This perception of inequity can also lead to emotional distress. Given the consequences of cancer on spouses, psychological interventions may be one means for helping them to cope. In this study, cognitive and behavioural methods are proposed to spouses in order to support them facing their partner’s cancer and their own issues. The overriding objective of this study is to satisfy the psychosocial needs of cancer patient spouses. In order to reach this objective, it compares the efficacy of two methods of action: 1/ hierarchical organization of psychosocial needs and problem-solving, and 2/ hierarchical organization of psychosocial needs alone. This research also aims to assess the influence of the perception of inequity that spouses might feel on the utilization of the two methods of action. The main hypothesis was that the combination of the two methods of action would have a greater and intensified impact on the assessed dependant variables than the utilization of the hierarchical organization of psychosocial needs alone. Thirty-seven spouses were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group (n= 19) and the control group (n= 18). The methodology provided identical protocols to the two groups with one difference in that the training period differed in order to measure the effect of training for problem-solving skills. The average age of participants in the experimental group was 58 (SD = 11) on average, and 57 (SD = 11) in the control group. They were asked to complete several questionnaires at three different time periods with a three-week time interval (T0, T1 and T2) assessing these dependent variables: psychosocial needs and emotional distress (anxiety and depression). Socio-demographic data and the perception of inequity were only evaluated at T0. At T0, all participants realized a hierarchy of psychosocial needs. Between T0 and T1, the experimental group trained in the problem-solving method while control group trained between T1 and T2 for this method. Repeated ANOVA measures were conducted to assess the evolution of the psychosocial needs. Student t-tests were computed to assess the influence of inequity perception on the utilization of the two methods of action. The results confirmed previous findings demonstrating the psychosocial needs in spouses of cancer patients. Indeed, it appears that these participants perceive more psychosocial needs than those of similar samples. This difference might be explained by the period of our intervention which occurred earlier than in experimental designs of similar studies. The overall emotional distress felt by our participants was characterized by anxiety. Therefore, being the caregiver of a cancer patient seems to foster anxiety more than depression. The results confirmed the main hypothesis showing a significant decrease of the number of unsatisfied psychosocial needs when participants have used the two methods of action. This decrease was observed whenever the combination was implemented. In other words, the combination of the two methods of action optimized meeting psychosocial needs. However, the perception of inequity did not seem to influence the utilization of these two methods. This research presents some limitations in the form of a small sample size and of a single assessment of inequity perception at T0. Nevertheless, the results of this preliminary study remain interesting and promising: further research could enhance the employed experimental design in a larger sample in order to obtain more robust results. [less ▲]

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See detailLa manie et la mélancolie comme crises de l’identité narrative et de l’intentionnalité
Englebert, Jérôme ULg; Stanghellini, Giovanni

in Evolution Psychiatrique (in press)

Objectives: Our objective is to achieve a phenomenological cross-study of melancholic and manic crises. To do this, we analyze the relationship between these two psychopathological states by means of the ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Our objective is to achieve a phenomenological cross-study of melancholic and manic crises. To do this, we analyze the relationship between these two psychopathological states by means of the concepts of "narrative identity" and "intentionality". Method: From clinical cases and with reference to various theoretical models derived from phenomenological psychopathology, we discuss similarities and differences between mania and melancholia. Results: Narrative identity is based on a double movement: that of the enunciation of a speech focused on his history and that of an act of creation. From different clinical situations, we find that: (1) the melancholic retains the ability to elaborate a narrative about his history but the creative dimension of this narrative is absent, and (2) conversely, the manic experiences only the creative dimension. Discussion: Intentionality, as the tendency of consciousness to move toward something beyond itself, proves to be the center of the manic existence without being able to set itself within the boundaries of factual constraints. The melancholic, conversely, experiences an existence in which consciousness has lost its capacity to aim beyond itself. Conclusions: Melancholia and mania are quite specific forms of being-in-world with particular identity and temporal experiences. These two states share a fundamental psychopathological feature, that we named here “manque chiasmatique”: they are disorders of the intentional movement that constitutes narrative identity, that is, of the dialectics between the rootedness (“enracinenment”) of self in its past and the possibility of creation of a new identity. [less ▲]

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See detailLetter to the Editor.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism (in press)

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See detailRugose corals across the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary in NW Turkey
Denayer, Julien ULg

in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica (in press)

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See detailNon-adiabatic study of the Kepler subgiant KIC 6442183
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

in The Space Photometry Revolution CoRoT Symposium 3, Kepler KASC-7 joint meeting (in press)

Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes) in several sub- giant power spectra. We perform a forward ... [more ▼]

Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes) in several sub- giant power spectra. We perform a forward modelling of a Kepler subgiant based on sur- face properties and observed frequencies. Non-adiabatic computations including a time- dependent treatment of convection give the lifetimes of radial and non-radial modes. Next, combining the lifetimes and inertias with a stochastic excitation model gives the ampli- tudes of the modes. We can now directly compare theoretical and observed linewidths and amplitudes of mixed-modes to obtain new constraints on our theoretical models. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of currently marketed anti-osteoporosis medications
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; NEUPREZ, Audrey ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Best Practice & Research. Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (in press)

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally ... [more ▼]

During the past 2 decades, many interventions were proven effective in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of an anti-osteoporosis treatment is to reduce fracture rates, ideally at all skeletal sites (i.e. spine, hip, and other non-spine). The armamentarium against osteoporosis includes anti-resorptive agents (i.e. bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators and denosumab), bone-forming agents (i.e. peptides from the parathyroid hormone family) and one agent with a dual mechanism of action (i.e. strontium ranelate). All these medications combine anti-fracture efficacy with a reasonable benefit/risk profile. However, the choice of a particular chemical entity, in one individual patient is based on the knowledge and expertise of the physician. Prioritization of drugs should be based on the individual profile of the patient, the severity of osteoporosis and the specific contraindications, warnings and precautions of use of the various available medications. [less ▲]

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See detailDramatic osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with oral bisphosphonates, periodontitis and dental implant removal
Ayora, A F; HERION, Francine ULg; ROMPEN, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Periodontology (in press)

Osteoporosis affects millions of elderly patients, and anti-resorptive drugs (ARD) such as bisphosphonates (BP) represent the first-line therapy. Despite the benefits related to the use of these ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis affects millions of elderly patients, and anti-resorptive drugs (ARD) such as bisphosphonates (BP) represent the first-line therapy. Despite the benefits related to the use of these medications, osteonecrosis of the jaw is a significant complication in a subset of patients receiving these drugs. CASE PRESENTATION: This report documents a case of dramatic bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis associated with periodontitis and dental implant removal in an osteoporotic patient treated with per os bisphosphonates for an uninterrupted period of 15 years. CONCLUSION: The aim of this report was to discuss the administration period of BP in the treatment of osteoporosis, the decision-making and clinical management of severe MRONJ and the indications for dental implant placement in these specific patients. [less ▲]

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See detailBrief exposure of embryos to steroids or aromatase inhibitor induces sex reversal in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Mafwila Kinkela, Patrick; Ulysse, Bernard et al

in Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological Genetics and Physiology (in press)

This study aimed to develop sex reversal procedures targeting the embryonic period as tools to study the early steps of sex differentiation in Nile tilapia with XX, XY and YY sexual genotypes. XX eggs ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to develop sex reversal procedures targeting the embryonic period as tools to study the early steps of sex differentiation in Nile tilapia with XX, XY and YY sexual genotypes. XX eggs were exposed to masculinizing treatments with androgens (17α-methyltestosterone, 11-ketotestosterone) or aromatase inhibitor (Fadrozole), whereas XY and YY eggs were subjected to feminizing treatments with estrogen analog (17α-ethynylestradiol). All treatments consisted of a single or double 4-h immersion applied between 1 and 36 h post-fertilization (hpf). Concentrations of active substances were 1000 or 2000 µg l-1 in XX and XY, and 2000 or 6500 µg l-1 in YY. Masculinizing treatments of XX embryos achieved a maximal sex reversal rate of 10 % with an exposure at 24 hpf to 1000 µg l-1 of 11-ketotestosterone or to 2000 µg l-1 of Fadrozole. Feminization of XY embryos was more efficient and induced up to 91 % sex reversal with an exposure to 2000 µg l-1 of 17α-ethynylestradiol. Interestingly, similar treatments failed to reverse YY fish to females, suggesting either that a sex determinant linked to the Y chromosome prevents the female pathway when present in two copies, or that a gene present on the X chromosome is needed for the development of a female phenotype. [less ▲]

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See detailThe sensitive period for male to female sex reversal begins at the embryonic stage in the Nile tilapia and is associated with the sexual genotype
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Mélard, Charles ULg; D'Cotta, Helena et al

in Molecular Reproduction and Development (in press)

In this study, we applied feminization treatments of 4 h on XY (17α-ethynylestradiol 2000 µg l-1) and YY (6500 µg l-1) Nile tilapia embryos on the first dpf. The mechanism of early sex reversal was ... [more ▼]

In this study, we applied feminization treatments of 4 h on XY (17α-ethynylestradiol 2000 µg l-1) and YY (6500 µg l-1) Nile tilapia embryos on the first dpf. The mechanism of early sex reversal was investigated by searching for changes in the expression profiles of some sex-differentiating genes in the brain (cyp19a1b, foxl2 and amh) and in sexual steroids (testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone) concentrations during embryogenesis and gonad differentiation. No sex reversal was observed in YY but sex reversal rates in XY progenies ranged from 0 to 60 %. These results, together with the clearance profile of 17α-ethynylestradiol confirmed the existence of an early sensitive period for sex determination encompassing embryonic and larval development, prior to any sign of gonad differentiation. The estrogen treatment induced an increased expression of cyp19a1b and a higher level of testosterone and 17β-estradiol at 4 dpf in XY and YY. Foxl2 and amh were repressed at 4 dpf and expression levels were not different between treated and control groups at 14 dpf suggesting that foxl2 did not control cyp19a1b in the brain of tilapia embryos. Increased cyp19a1b expression in treated embryos could reflect a sign of early brain sexualization but alone cannot account for the sex reversal effect as the treatment was ineffective in YY. The differential sensitivity of XY and YY genotypes to embryo induced-feminization suggests that a sex determinant on the sex chromosomes, either a Y repressor or an X activator may influence the sex reversal during the first steps of tilapia embryogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental and numerical study of the flight of geese
Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg; Gardiner, James; Tickle, Peter et al

in Aeronautical Journal (in press)

The flight of barnacle geese at airspeeds representing high-speed migrating flight is investigated using experiments and simulations. The experimental part of the work involved the filming of three ... [more ▼]

The flight of barnacle geese at airspeeds representing high-speed migrating flight is investigated using experiments and simulations. The experimental part of the work involved the filming of three barnacle geese (Branta Leucopsis) flying at different airspeeds in a wind tunnel. The video footage was analysed in order to extract the wing kinematics. Additional information, such as wing geometry and camber was obtained from a 3D scan of a dried wing. An unsteady vortex lattice method was used to simulate the aerodynamics of the measured flapping motion. The simulations were used in order to successfully reproduce the measured body motion and thus obtain estimates of the aerodynamic forces acting on the wings. It was found that the mean of the wing pitch angle variation with time has the most significant effect on lift while the difference in the durations of the upstroke and downstroke has the major effect on thrust. The power consumed by the aerodynamic forces was also estimated; it was found that increases in aerodynamic power correspond very closely to climbing motion and vice versa. Root-mean-square values of the power range from 100 W to 240 W. Finally, it was observed that tandem flying can be very expensive for the trailing bird. [less ▲]

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