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See detailMaison Lapaille
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Charlier, Sébastien; Moor, Thomas (Eds.) Guide d’architecture moderne et contemporaine à Liège (in press)

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See detailMaison Rogister
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Charlier, Sébastien; Moor, Thomas (Eds.) Guide d’architecture moderne et contemporaine à Liège (in press)

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See detailCastiglioni, Achille
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailMaison Gédeon Michel
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Charlier, Sébastien; Moor, Thomas (Eds.) Guide d’architecture moderne et contemporaine à Liège (in press)

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See detailSuperstudio
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailSeymour de Ricci (1881-1942)
Carlig, Nathan ULg

in Capasso, Mario (Ed.) Hermae. Scholars and Scholarship in Papyrology, IV (in press)

Portrait bio-bibliographique papyrologique de l'érudit franco-anglais Seymour de Ricci (1881-1942).

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See detailSottsass, Ettore
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriett; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailPonti, Gio
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailDeganello, Paolo
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailNizzoli, Marcello
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailPesce, Gaetano
Prina, Daniela ULg

in Atkinson, Harriet; Edwards, Clive; Kettley, Sarah (Eds.) et al Encyclopedia of Design (in press)

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See detailA Spatiotemporal Analysis of Membership: Formalizing the Space-Time Elements of Connection for Groups
Hallot, Pierre ULg; Stewart, Kathleen

in Proceedings of the AAG Annual Meeting (in press)

This research aims to formalize the spatiotemporal relationships of membership between individuals and the groups to which they belong. Specifically, we analyze how the membership to a community evolves ... [more ▼]

This research aims to formalize the spatiotemporal relationships of membership between individuals and the groups to which they belong. Specifically, we analyze how the membership to a community evolves over time considering past, present and future connections. The framework developed for this research is presented using an ontological approach. We demonstrate a specific domain ontology application for spatiotemporal membership using BFO2, an updated version of the Basic Formal Ontology. Key to this work is the representation of membership, modeled through different kinds of mereological relations possible with a group, for example, pre-member, active member, and alumni that capture how membership evolves and changes over time. The semantic web rule language (SWRL) is used to express the different spatiotemporal events that relate to membership and their consequences on membership such as subscription, graduation and reunion events. Mobility events are also included in the model. SWRL supports reasoning using the ontology and studying the evolution of membership between people and their various groups. We use the environment of a university community as an exemplar to develop and test the formalizations. However, the ideas are generalizable to a wide range of spatiotemporal domains, for example, these ideas hold for citizenship modeling or for consumers shopping at certain retail chains. The study of the evolution of membership connections between these entities and groups lends important insights for many different kinds of event planning. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiscale variability of amphipod assemblages in Posidonia oceanica meadows
Sturaro, Nicolas ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Vermeulen, Simon et al

in Journal of Sea Research (in press)

The study of spatial patterns is of ecological importance in order to understand the causes of the distribution and abundance of organisms, and it also provides valuable basis for management and ... [more ▼]

The study of spatial patterns is of ecological importance in order to understand the causes of the distribution and abundance of organisms, and it also provides valuable basis for management and conservation. Amphipod crustaceans are key organisms in seagrass ecosystems. However, little attention has been paid to the spatial scales at which amphipod assemblages may vary. We examined variability patterns of amphipod populations inhabiting Posidonia oceanica meadows, over spatial scales spanning four orders of magnitude (1 to 1000 metres) and for two consecutive years. This study reports the scales that contributed most to spatial variation of amphipod assemblages and explores the potential processes of the observed patterns, with particular emphasis on habitat features. The number of species, the diversity and the density of some species, exhibited high variation across years. Most species showed the highest spatial variation in density and biomass at small scales (~1 and 10 m). Based on density data, the structure of amphipod assemblages did not differ at any scales investigated. The patchiness that occurred at small scales may have been only weakly related to habitat features. Instead, we postulated that behavioural processes of amphipods were likely good explanatory factors. Although, the small scale spatial variability can be an important feature of amphipod assemblages in P. oceanica meadows, many patterns probably remained undetected as they may occur at scales smaller than those investigated. [less ▲]

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See detail(Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

Book published by Presses Universitaires de Liège (in press)

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See detailNarrating tradition: the emergence of the monumental Triumph Scene at Thebes
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

in Gillen, Todd Jonathan (Ed.) (Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt (in press)

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See detailIntroduction: (Re)productive Traditions, Cultural Transmission and Egyptology
Gillen, Todd Jonathan ULg

in Gillen, Todd Jonathan (Ed.) (Re)productive Traditions in Ancient Egypt (in press)

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See detailCalibration and precision of serum creatinine and plasma cystatin C measurement: impact on the estimation of glomerular filtration rate
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Cristol, Jean-Paul et al

in Journal of Nephrology (in press)

Serum creatinine (SCr) is the main variable for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Due to interassay differences, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) varies according to the assay ... [more ▼]

Serum creatinine (SCr) is the main variable for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Due to interassay differences, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) varies according to the assay used, and calibration standardization is necessary. For SCr, isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is the gold standard. Systematic differences are observed between Jaffe and enzymatic methods. Manufacturers subtract 0.30 mg/dl from Jaffe results to match enzymatic results (‘compensated Jaffe method’). The analytical performance of enzymatic methods is superior to that of Jaffe methods. In the original Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation, SCr was measured by a Jaffe Beckman assay, which was later recalibrated. A limitation of this equation was an underestimation of GFR in the high range. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) consortium proposed an equation using calibrated and IDMS traceable SCr. The gain in performance was due to improving the bias whereas the precision was comparable. The CKD-EPI equation performs better at high GFR levels (GFR[60 ml/ min/1.73 m2). Analytical limitations have led to the recommendation to give a grade ([60 ml/min/1.73 m2) rather than an absolute value with the MDRD equation. By using both enzymatic and calibrated methods, this cutoff-grade could be increased to 90 ml/min/1.73 m2 (with MDRD) and 120 ml/min/1.73 m2 (with CKD-EPI). The superiority of the CKD-EPI equation over MDRD is analytical, but the precision gain is limited. IDMS traceable enzymatic methods have been used in the development of the Lund– Malmo¨ (in CKD populations) and Berlin Initiative Study equations (in the elderly). The analytical errors for cystatin C are grossly comparable to issues found with SCr. Standardization is available since 2011. A reference method for cystatin C is still lacking. Equations based on standardized cystatin C or cystatin C and creatinine have been proposed. The better performance of these equations (especially the combined CKD-EPI equation) has been demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailOceanic forcing of Antarctic climate change: A study using a stretched-grid atmospheric general circulation model
Krinner, Gerhard; Largeron, Chloé; Ménégoz, Martin et al

in Journal of Climate (in press)

A variable-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is used for climate change projections over the Antarctic. The present-day simulation uses prescribed observed sea-surface conditions ... [more ▼]

A variable-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is used for climate change projections over the Antarctic. The present-day simulation uses prescribed observed sea-surface conditions, while a set of five simulations for the end of the 21st century (2070-2099) under the SRES-A1B scenario uses sea- surface condition anomalies from selected CMIP3 coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Analysis of the results shows that the prescribed sea-surface condition anomalies have a very strong influence on the simulated climate change on the Antarctic continent, largely dominating the direct effect of the prescribed greenhouse gas concentration changes in the AGCM simulations. Complementary simulations with idealized forcings confirm these results. An analysis of circulation changes using self-organizing maps shows that the simulated climate change on regional scales is not principally caused by shifts of the frequencies of the dominant circulation patterns, except for precipitation changes in some coastal regions. The study illustrates that in some respects the use of bias-corrected sea- surface boundary conditions in climate projections with a variable-resolution atmospheric general circulation model has some distinct advantages over the use of limited-area atmospheric circulation models directly forced by generally biased coupled climate model output. [less ▲]

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