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See detailCortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Jaakko, Nieminen; Siclari, Francesca et al

Poster (2015, March)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response. Previous TMS-EEG studies have shown clear-cut differences between conscious and unconscious conditions. When subjects are unconscious, as in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep early in the night (stage N3), anesthesia or coma, TMS typically triggers a stereotypical and local slow-wave response. When they are conscious, as in normal wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep (REM) sleep, brain responses to TMS are long-lasting, widespread, complex, and differentiated. In this study, we performed TMS-EEG during NREM sleep in stage 2 (N2) and N3 on 7 healthy participants. Brain activity was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible EEG and single-pulse TMS was applied (up to 285 pulses per session) on the superior parietal cortex. After each TMS session (5 to 15 sessions per night), subjects were awakened to ask for a dream report. TMS-EEG responses were analyzed using the global mean field amplitude (GMFA), the perturbational complexity index (PCI), as well as time-frequency measures. Our results show that the TMS-EEG response during N3 is larger and slower than during N2 sleep. The GMFA is higher and PCI is lower in N3 as compared to N2 sleep. Moreover, N3 recordings showed activation at lower frequency bands after TMS as compared to N2 sleep. Additionally, TMS-EEG responses vary depending on whether subjects do or do not report a dream. TMS-EEG might provide valuable information for characterizing neurophysiological fluctuations and levels of consciousness within NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detail(In)sécurités linguistiques francophones en Belgique : du taux d’insécurité aux facteurs d’(in)sécurité
Dassargues, Alix ULg

in L'insécurité en question : défis, enjeux et perspectives (2015, March)

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See detailConclusion
Famerie, Etienne ULg

in Ferrary, Jean-Louis; Pittia, Sylvie; Sanchez, Pierre (Eds.) La diplomatie romaine sous la République : réflexions sur une pratique (2015)

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See detailAnalysis of some finite difference schemes for slightly noisy time dependent signals
Dumont, Fabien ULg

Report (2015)

Various numerical differentiation methods have been developed to compute an approximated derivative of the signal from its discrete values. Amongst them, one of the most commonly applied is the finite ... [more ▼]

Various numerical differentiation methods have been developed to compute an approximated derivative of the signal from its discrete values. Amongst them, one of the most commonly applied is the finite difference method. Particularly in the case of experimental data, substantial noise or imprecision may be present in the signal. And here is the crux of the matter: straightforward schemes with short-differentiation steps will amplify this noise, often so much that the result appears to be unusable. While increasing the differentiation step has the positive effect of decreasing the noise, it also has two adverse effects: it produces a time shift compared with what would have been expected, and it introduces distortion by broadening and flattening the narrow features. The present study will focus on the moving-average filter on one hand, and on differentiation by some usual finite difference schemes on the other hand. Amongst relevant parameters, the influence of the sampling period and the differentiation step will be examined, in particular regarding their consequence on the time-accuracy and the noise filtering effect of the considered methods. [less ▲]

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See detailPresentation of the results of the fire resistance round robin on steel beam (EGOLF)
Dumont, Fabien ULg

Report (2015)

This presentation reports the statistical analysis conducted on the raw data issued from the TC2 14-1 round-robin performed by 16 fire testing laboratories members of EGOLF. The test specimen is a HEB300 ... [more ▼]

This presentation reports the statistical analysis conducted on the raw data issued from the TC2 14-1 round-robin performed by 16 fire testing laboratories members of EGOLF. The test specimen is a HEB300 hot rolled steel beam tested according to EN 1365-3. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the production of Belgian bioethanol fit with European requirements on GHG emissions? Case of wheat
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Biomass & Bioenergy (2015), 74

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of bioethanol production, using wheat cultivated in Belgium. Cultivation steps are modelled using Belgian specific data. Wheat transformation in ethanol ... [more ▼]

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of bioethanol production, using wheat cultivated in Belgium. Cultivation steps are modelled using Belgian specific data. Wheat transformation in ethanol relies on industrial data. GHG emissions of the whole life cycle are calculated and compared with the default values given by the European Renewable Energy Directive. Belgian wheat bioethanol achieves a 5% higher GHG reduction than the one mentioned in the European directive but impact repartition is different with a higher importance of cultivation step in our case. Belgian wheat bioethanol complies with the current sustainability criteria but is also able to conform to further ones. Sensitivity analyses are performed on the importance of N fertilizers and associated emissions known as main important parameters. These analyses reveal non negligible variations and then a range of available GHG reduction when using wheat bioethanol. [less ▲]

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See detailSplit-Band Interferometric SAR Processing Using TanDEM-X Data
De Rauw, Dominique ULg; Kervyn, François; d'Oreye, Nicolas et al

in ESA SP-731 (2015, March)

Most recent SAR sensors use wide band signals to achieve metric range resolution. One can also take advantage of wide band to split it into sub-bands and generate several lower-resolution images, centered ... [more ▼]

Most recent SAR sensors use wide band signals to achieve metric range resolution. One can also take advantage of wide band to split it into sub-bands and generate several lower-resolution images, centered on slightly different frequencies, from a single acquisition. This process, named Multi Chromatic Analysis (MCA) corresponds to performing a spectral analysis of SAR images. Split-Band SAR interferometry (SBInSAR) is based on spectral analysis performed on each image of an InSAR pair, yielding a stack of sub-band interferograms. Scatterers keeping a coherent behaviour in each sub-band interferogram show a phase that varies linearly with the carrier frequency, the slope being proportional to the absolute optical path difference. This potentially solves the problems of phase unwrapping on a pixel-per-pixel basis. In this paper, we present an SBInSAR processor and its application using TanDEM-X data over the Nyiragongo volcano. [less ▲]

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See detailConcordance between muscle mass assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis and by dual energy X-ray absorptionmetry among elderly people: a cross-sectional study
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders (2015), 16(1), 60-67

BACKGROUND: Besides magnetic resonance imaging, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) seems the most reliable tool to evaluate body composition and is often considered as the gold standard in clinical ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Besides magnetic resonance imaging, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) seems the most reliable tool to evaluate body composition and is often considered as the gold standard in clinical practice. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) could provide a simpler, portative, and less expensive alternative. Because the body composition assessment by BIA is device-dependent, the aim of this study was to appraise the concordance between the specific bioelectrical impedance device InBody S10 and DXA for the body composition evaluation. METHODS: Body composition, included appendicular lean mass divided by height squared (ALM/ht2) was measured by DXA (Hologic QDR Discovery device) and by BIA (InBody S10 Biospace device). Agreement between tools was assessed by means of the Bland Altman method and reliability was determined using the IntraClass Coefficient (ICC). ICC was also computed to assess the reliability of the test-retest performed by the same operator or by two different ones. RESULTS: A total of 219 subjects were enrolled in this study (mean age: 43.7 +/- 19.1 years old, 51.6% of women). For the ALM/ht2, reliability of the test-retest of the BIA was high with an ICC of 0.89 (95%CI: 0.86-0.92) when performed by the same operator and an ICC of 0.77 (95%CI: 0.72-0.82) when performed by two different operators. Agreement between ALM/ht2 assessed by DXA and BIA was low (ICC = 0.37 (95%CI: 0.25-0.48)). Mean ALM/ht2 was 9.19 +/- 1.39 kg/m2 with BIA and 7.34 +/- 1.34 kg/m2 with DXA, (p < 0001). A formula developed using a multiple regression analysis, and taking into account muscle mass assessed by BIA, as well as sex and body mass index, explains 89% of the ALM/ht2 assessed by DXA. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results show that the measure of ALM/ht2 by BIA is reliable, the agreement between DXA and BIA is low. Indeed, BIA seems to overestimate ALM/ht2 compared to DXA and, consequently, it is important to use an adapted formula to obtain measurement of the appendicular lean mass by BIA close to that measured by DXA. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is important in being cured from: Does discordance between physicians and patients matter? (2)
Demyttenaere, Koen; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2015), 174(2015), 372-377

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See detailWhat is important in being cured from depression? Discordance between physicians and patients (1)
Demyttenaere, Koen; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2015), 174(2015), 390-396

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailMeasurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes over artificial sea ice emphasize the role of bubbles in gas transport
Kotovitch, Marie ULg; Moreau, Sébastion; Zhou, Jiayun et al

Poster (2015, March)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of transcranial magnetic stimulation coil orientation and pulse width on short-latency afferent inhibition
Hannah, Ricci; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Goetz, Stefan et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailPreliminary analysis of Martian dayglow observed by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph onboard MAVEN
Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nick et al

Conference (2015, March)

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See detailPreliminary analysis of Martian nightglow and aurora observed by MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph
Stiepen, Arnaud ULg; Stewart; Jain et al

Conference (2015, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)