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See detailBien soigner l'arthrose: un enjeu capital pour notre société!
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailGeophysics for the quantification of water fluxes in the soil-plant system
Garré, Sarah ULg; Binley, Andrew

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailBioinspired polymers for the functionalization of stainless steel surfaces by green processes
Detrembleur, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailGrowth partitioning within beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) varies in response to summer heat waves and related droughts
Latte, Nicolas ULg; Lebourgeois, François; Claessens, Hugues ULg

in Trees (2015)

To characterize growth partitioning within the tree and its responses to climate, we studied 8 dominant beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) of a pure, even-aged 98-year-old stand in Belgium. We sampled 10 ... [more ▼]

To characterize growth partitioning within the tree and its responses to climate, we studied 8 dominant beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) of a pure, even-aged 98-year-old stand in Belgium. We sampled 10 disks along the stem from breast height to treetop and examined the inter-annual patterns of, and discrepancies between, ring-area and volume increments by performing detailed stem analysis and dendroecological investigations. Although the common inter-annual variation among all increment series was high, we observed increasing growth variability and climate sensitivity with height, leading to notable bole-crown discrepancies. Both the common inter-annual variation and bole-crown discrepancies were mainly driven by summer heat waves and related droughts of the previous year, and spring droughts of the current year. Despite these discrepancies, the radial growth at breast height can be considered a good estimate of the tree volume increment but not for the purpose of focusing on climatic effects of isolated years. Extreme climatic conditions increase the risk of inaccurate estimations. The results of the present study are discussed in relation to tree ecophysiology hypotheses. [less ▲]

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See detailStability and Aging of Phase Change Materials : An Ab Initio Perspective
Raty, Jean-Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

Data recording with Phase Change Materials is a much studied topic as the writing/erasing characteristics, cyclability and downscaling properties of these materials allow for efficient data storage in ... [more ▼]

Data recording with Phase Change Materials is a much studied topic as the writing/erasing characteristics, cyclability and downscaling properties of these materials allow for efficient data storage in future generations of devices. Nevertheless, some aspects of phase change materials are limiting their performances and delaying their wider technological application. First, aging phenomena are common to all amorphous structures, but of special importance PCMs since it impedes the realization of multi-level memories. Different interpretations have been proposed, but we focus here on the structural relaxation of amorphous GeTe, chosen because it is the simplest system that is representative of the wider class of GST alloys, lying along the GeTe-Sb2Te3 composition line of the GeSbTe phase diagram. One difficulty encountered in the simulation of these amorphous systems is that the direct generation of an amorphous structure by quenching a liquid using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Molecular Dynamics leads to one sample with a small number of atoms, and, hence of small number of atomic environments. Here we sample a large number of local atomic environments, corresponding to different bonding schemes, by chemically substituting different alloys, selected to favor different local atomic structures. This enables spanning a larger fraction of the configuration space relevant to aging. Our results support a model of the amorphous phase and its time evolution that involves an evolution of the local (chemical) order towards that of the crystal. On the other hand its electronic properties drift away from those of the crystal, driven by an increase of the Peierls-like distortion of the local environments in the amorphous, as compared to the crystal [1]. A second problem faced by PCMs is the fact that data recording is limited at high temperature due to the increased propensity to recrystallize. One approach to counter this is to stabilize the PCM using impurity atoms such as C or N. Using DFT and the analysis of the mechanical properties (constraints theory), we demonstrate how these impurity atoms modify the rigidity of the network, which is experimentally correlated with the activation energy for crystallization [2]. Finally, the crystal phase itself has been shown to have variable conductivities depending on the thermal history and annealing conditions. If this could be used profitably for multi-level recording, it also indicates that the crystal is undergoes some temporal evolution. Using DFT, we clarify the stability behavior of GST crystal and show that the metal-insulator transition is driven by the migration of intrinsic vacancies and an Anderson localization transition [3]. [1] J.Y Raty, W. Zhang, J. Luckas, C. Chen, R. Mazzarello, C. Bichara and M. Wuttig, Nat. Comm. (2015) [2] G. Ghezzi, J.Y. Raty, S. Maitrejean, A. Roule, E. Elkaim and F. Hippert, Applied Physics Letters, 99 (2011) 151906 [3] W. Zhang, A. Thiess, P. Zalden, R. Zeller, P. H. Dederichs, J-Y. Raty, M.Wuttig, S. Blügel et R. Mazzarello, Nature Materials 11 (2012) 952 [less ▲]

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See detailFaecal microbiota characterisation of horses using 16 rdna barcoded pyrosequencing, and carriage rate of clostridium difficile at hospital admission
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Brévers, Bastien et al

in BMC Microbiology (2015), 15

Background The equine faecal microbiota is very complex and remains largely unknown, while interspecies interactions have an important contribution to animal health. Clostridium difficile has been ... [more ▼]

Background The equine faecal microbiota is very complex and remains largely unknown, while interspecies interactions have an important contribution to animal health. Clostridium difficile has been identified as an important cause of diarrhoea in horses. This study provides further information on the nature of the bacterial communities present in horses developing an episode of diarrhoea. The prevalence of C. difficile in hospitalised horses at the time of admission is also reported. Results Bacterial diversity of the gut microbiota in diarrhoea is lower than that in non-diarrhoeic horses in terms of species richness (p-value <0.002) and in population evenness (p-value: 0.02). Statistical differences for Actinobacillus, Porphyromonas, RC9 group, Roseburia and Ruminococcaceae were revealed. Fusobacteria was found in horses with diarrhoea but not in any of the horses with non-diarrheic faeces. In contrast, Akkermansia was among the three predominant taxa in all of the horses studied. The overall prevalence of C. difficile in the total samples of hospitalised horses at admission was 3.7 % (5/134), with five different PCR-ribotypes identified, including PCR-ribotype 014. Two colonised horses displayed a decreased bacterial species richness compared to the remaining subjects studied, which shared the same Bacteroides genus. However, none of the positive animals had diarrhoea at the moment of sampling. Conclusions The abundance of some taxa in the faecal microbiota of diarrhoeic horses can be a result of microbiome dysbiosis, and therefore a cause of intestinal disease, or some of these taxa may act as equine enteric pathogens. Clostridium difficile colonisation seems to be transient in all of the horses studied, without overgrowth to trigger infection. A large proportion of the sequences were unclassified, showing the complexity of horses’ faecal microbiota. [less ▲]

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See detailExoplanet science with the LBTI: instrument status and plans
Defrère, D.; Hinz, P.; Skemer, A. et al

in Shaklan, Stuart (Ed.) Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets VII (2015, September 16)

The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a strategic instrument of the LBT designed for high-sensitivity, high-contrast, and high-resolution infrared (1.5-13 $\mu$m) imaging of nearby ... [more ▼]

The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a strategic instrument of the LBT designed for high-sensitivity, high-contrast, and high-resolution infrared (1.5-13 $\mu$m) imaging of nearby planetary systems. To carry out a wide range of high-spatial resolution observations, it can combine the two AO-corrected 8.4-m apertures of the LBT in various ways including direct (non-interferometric) imaging, coronagraphy (APP and AGPM), Fizeau imaging, non-redundant aperture masking, and nulling interferometry. It also has broadband, narrowband, and spectrally dispersed capabilities. In this paper, we review the performance of these modes in terms of exoplanet science capabilities and describe recent instrumental milestones such as first-light Fizeau images (with the angular resolution of an equivalent 22.8-m telescope) and deep interferometric nulling observations. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding bridges (preliminary steps towards a new dictionary of Ancient Egyptian)
Winand, Jean ULg

Conference (2015, September 16)

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See detailNDS27, the soluble derivative from curcumin binds to and inhibits myeloperoxidase
Franck, Thierry ULg; Derochette, Sandrine ULg; Zouaoui-Boudjeltia, Karim et al

Poster (2015, September 16)

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See detailEtude et caractérisation de mousses aqueuses sous contrainte
Bronfort, Ariane ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

De nombreuses questions subsistent quant à la nature d’une interface entre une mousse et une solution. Ce travail concerne l’influence des conditions aux limites au niveau d’une telle interface sur le ... [more ▼]

De nombreuses questions subsistent quant à la nature d’une interface entre une mousse et une solution. Ce travail concerne l’influence des conditions aux limites au niveau d’une telle interface sur le volume de mousse lorsqu’elle est perturbée par une contrainte extérieure. Le lien entre mousse et interface a été étudié dans deux situations différentes : une contrainte normale et une contrainte tangentielle. L’instabilité de Faraday permet de soumettre l’interface à une contrainte normale périodique. L’influence de la géométrie du système a été investiguée pour une surface libre. La modification de la longueur d’onde a été expliquée en terme d’augmentation de l’énergie interfaciale. La perte d’énergie a également été modélisée à l’aide de trois sources : la viscosité de la solution, la présence de molécules de surfactants à la surface et la condition de non-glissement aux parois. L’interaction entre une mousse et l’instabilité de Faraday est ensuite étudiée. La dissipation visqueuse est augmentée par la présence de bulles et a pu être modélisée à l’aide de considérations énergétiques. Il a également été montré qu’un faible nombre de couches de bulles est suffisant pour amortir efficacement toute perturbation de l’interface. La contrainte tangentielle est appliquée à l’interface grâce à un dispositif inspiré des milieux granulaires permettant la rotation d’une cellule de Hele-Shaw autour de son centre. Dans un tel dispositif, les caractéristiques de la mousse et de l’interface varient. Deux modèles prédictifs permettent d’expliquer l’évolution temporelle de la fraction de liquide moyenne. Des outils statistiques ont permis de définir une relation entre les déformations des bulles et les caractéristiques macroscopiques de la mousse. Grâce à la modélisation de l’écoulement, un lien a été établi entre le gradient de pression interne de la mousse et la déformation de l’interface. Finalement, nos résultats sont comparés à ceux obtenus pour des ensembles granulaires dans un dispositif expérimental similaire. [less ▲]

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See detailVocabulaire liturgique et strates lexicales en indo-iranien ancien
Swennen, Philippe ULg

Conference (2015, September 16)

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See detailLes vies de Vasari et quelques autres sources sur le portraits florentins du XVIe siècle
Agosti, Barbara; Geremicca, Antonio ULg

in Falciani, Carlo (Ed.) Florence. Portrait à la cour des Médicis (2015)

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See detailLes arts à la cour de Cosme Ier et François Ier de Médicis. Comparaison entre un père et son fils
Geremicca, Antonio ULg

in Falciani, Carlo (Ed.) Florence. Portrait à la cour des Médicis (2015)

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See detailAn Ant Colony System for Responsive Dynamic Vehicle Routing
Schyns, Michael ULg

in European Journal of Operational Research (2015), 245(3), 704-718

We present an algorithm based on an Ant Colony System to deal with a broad range of Dynamic Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problems with Time Windows, (partial) Split Delivery and Heterogeneous fleets ... [more ▼]

We present an algorithm based on an Ant Colony System to deal with a broad range of Dynamic Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problems with Time Windows, (partial) Split Delivery and Heterogeneous fleets (DVRPTWSD). Besides the traditional distance criterion, we address the important case of responsiveness. Responsiveness is defined here as completing a delivery as soon as possible, within the time window, such that the client or the truck may restart its activities. This is crucial for many production or service activities in different fields: express parcel deliveries, taxi services, Just in Time production, express repair services, medical care, petrol station replenishment, etc. We develop an interactive web-based solution to allow dispatchers to take new information into account in real-time. The algorithm and its parametrization were tested on real and artificial instances. We first illustrate our approach with a problem submitted by Liege Airport, the 8th biggest cargo airport in Europe. The goal is to develop a decision system to optimize the journey of the refueling trucks. We then consider some classical VRP benchmarks with extensions for more complex problems. [less ▲]

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See detailA General Review of Model Order Reduction Techniques for Magnetodynamic Problems
Paquay, Yannick ULg

Scientific conference (2015, September 15)

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See detailEfficient and Precise Trajectory Planning for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots
Lens, Stéphane ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Trajectory planning is one of the fundamental problems in mobile robotics. A wide variety of approaches have been proposed over the years to deal with the various issues of this problem. This thesis ... [more ▼]

Trajectory planning is one of the fundamental problems in mobile robotics. A wide variety of approaches have been proposed over the years to deal with the various issues of this problem. This thesis presents an original and complete solution to tackle the motion planning problem for nonholonomic mobile robots in two-dimensional space. Given a set of obstacles, an initial and a goal configuration, the problem consists in computing efficiently a physically feasible trajectory that reaches the specified target as fast as possible. One of the original aspects of this work lies in the decomposition of the general problem into several simpler subproblems, for which very efficient solutions are developed. Their combination provides a complete trajectory planning approach that is one of the most computationally effective method suited for the motion of cylindrically shaped wheeled mobile robots in the presence of polygonal obstacles. This complete solution consists of three main steps. The first one is aimed at finding a short path that avoids obstacles and manages to reach the destination, without taking into account nonholonomic constraints of the robot. Our path planning method relies on an original refinement procedure of a constrained Delaunay triangulation of the obstacles, that outperforms other existing planning techniques. The second step consists in interpolating paths into smooth curves that can be followed by a real robot without slowing down excessively. By joining only two arcs of clothoids for moving from one curvature to another, our approach is simpler and also computationally cheaper than other interpolation methods. Finally, thanks to the introduction of an original discretization scheme, an efficient algorithm for computing a time-optimal speed profile for arbitrary paths is presented. The speed profile that results from this procedure not only allows the robot to follow the synthesized path as fast as possible while taking into account a broad class of velocity and accelerations constraints, but also provides the accurate advance information necessary to implementing coordinated actions during the displacement of the robot (e.g., between the locomotion system and other actuators). [less ▲]

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See detailEmpirical comparison of scoring rules at early stages of CAT
Magis, David ULg

Conference (2015, September 15)

Usual scoring rules in CATs include maximum likelihood (ML), weighted likelihood (WL) and Bayesian approaches. However, at early stages of adaptive testing, only a few item responses are available so the ... [more ▼]

Usual scoring rules in CATs include maximum likelihood (ML), weighted likelihood (WL) and Bayesian approaches. However, at early stages of adaptive testing, only a few item responses are available so the amount of information is very limited and in addition constant patterns (i.e. only correct or only incorrect responses) are often observed, yielding ML scoring intractable. Specific scoring rules (such as fixed- or variable stepsize adjustments) were developed for that purpose. However recent research highlighted that both Bayesian and WL scoring rules may provide finite values even with small sets of items. The purpose of this presentation is twofold: (a) to make a quick review of available scoring rules at early stages of CAT, and (b) to present empirical results from a simulation study that compares those scoring rules. More precisely, three scoring scenarios will be investigated: stepsize adjustment followed by ML, Bayes or WL followed by ML, and constant scoring rule throughout the CAT. These methods will be compared by means of simulated item banks and under various CAT scenarios for next item selection and stopping rules. Empirical results will be presented and practical guidelines for early stage scoring will be outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnotations as reflection amplifiers in online learning - An exploratory study
Verpoorten, Dominique ULg; Specht, Marcus; Westera, Wim

in Ullmann, T; Kravcik, M; Mikroyannidis, A (Eds.) et al Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology-Enhanced Learning (ARTEL). In conjunction with the 10th european conference on technology enhanced learning: Design for teaching and learning in a networked world. (2015, September 15)

In a controlled experiment on the effects of frequent and local digital annotations, 137 volunteers covered an online course at 3 conditions: no/free/question-based electronic annotations. Results show no ... [more ▼]

In a controlled experiment on the effects of frequent and local digital annotations, 137 volunteers covered an online course at 3 conditions: no/free/question-based electronic annotations. Results show no difference in performance between groups. However, analyses conducted within treatments suggest positive impacts on performance when annotation rates are taken into consideration, and coupled with other reflective enactments. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 ULg)