Last 7 days
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn vitro culture of seal muscle-derived satellite cells
Freichels, Astrid ULg; Baise, Etienne ULg; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (7 ULg)
See detailModelling the Congo basin ecosystems with a dynamic vegetation model
Dury, Marie ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Trolliet, Franck ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

The scarcity of field observations in some parts of the world makes difficult a deep understanding of some ecosystems such as humid tropical forests in Central Africa. Therefore, modelling tools are ... [more ▼]

The scarcity of field observations in some parts of the world makes difficult a deep understanding of some ecosystems such as humid tropical forests in Central Africa. Therefore, modelling tools are interesting alternatives to study those regions even if the lack of data often prevents sharp calibration and validation of the model projections. Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) are process-based models that simulate shifts in potential vegetation and its associated biogeochemical and hydrological cycles in response to climate. Initially run at the global scale, DVMs can be run at any spatial scale provided that climate and soil data are available. In the framework of the BIOSERF project (“Sustainability of tropical forest biodiversity and services under climate and human pressure”), we use and adapt the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) to study the Congo basin vegetation dynamics. The field campaigns have notably allowed the refinement of the vegetation representation from plant functional types (PFTs) to individual species through the collection of parameters such as the specific leaf area or the leaf C:N ratio of common tropical tree species and the location of their present-day occurrences from literature and available database. Here, we test the model ability to reproduce the present spatial and temporal variations of carbon stocks (e.g. biomass, soil carbon) and fluxes (e.g. gross and net primary productivities (GPP and NPP), net ecosystem production (NEP)) as well as the observed distribution of the studied species over the Congo basin. In the lack of abundant and long-term measurements, we compare model results with time series of remote sensing products (e.g. vegetation leaf area index (LAI), GPP and NPP). Several sensitivity tests are presented: we assess consecutively the impacts of the level at which the vegetation is simulated (PFTs or species), the spatial resolution and the initial land cover (potential or human-induced). First, we show simulations over the whole Congo basin at a 0.5◦ spatial resolution. Then, we present high-resolution simulations (1 km) carried out over different areas of the Congo basin, notably the DRC part of the WWF Lake Tele – Lake Tumba Landscape. Studied in the BIOSERF project, this area is characterized by a forest-savannah mosaic but also by swamp and flooded forest. In addition, forward transient projections of the model driven with the outputs of about thirty global cli- mate models (GCMs) from the new Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) will permit to outline the likely response of carbon pools to changing climate over the Congo basin during the 21th century. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULg)
See detailModelling the Congo basin ecosystems with a dynamic vegetation model
Dury, Marie ULg; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Trolliet, Franck ULg et al

Conference (2014, April)

The scarcity of field observations in some parts of the world makes difficult a deep understanding of some ecosystems such as humid tropical forests in Central Africa. Therefore, modelling tools are ... [more ▼]

The scarcity of field observations in some parts of the world makes difficult a deep understanding of some ecosystems such as humid tropical forests in Central Africa. Therefore, modelling tools are interesting alternatives to study those regions even if the lack of data often prevents sharp calibration and validation of the model projections. Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) are process-based models that simulate shifts in potential vegetation and its associated biogeochemical and hydrological cycles in response to climate. Initially run at the global scale, DVMs can be run at any spatial scale provided that climate and soil data are available. In the framework of the BIOSERF project (“Sustainability of tropical forest biodiversity and services under climate and human pressure”), we use and adapt the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) to study the Congo basin vegetation dynamics. The field campaigns have notably allowed the refinement of the vegetation representation from plant functional types (PFTs) to individual species through the collection of parameters such as the specific leaf area or the leaf C:N ratio of common tropical tree species and the location of their present-day occurrences from literature and available database. Here, we test the model ability to reproduce the present spatial and temporal variations of carbon stocks (e.g. biomass, soil carbon) and fluxes (e.g. gross and net primary productivities (GPP and NPP), net ecosystem production (NEP)) as well as the observed distribution of the studied species over the Congo basin. In the lack of abundant and long-term measurements, we compare model results with time series of remote sensing products (e.g. vegetation leaf area index (LAI), GPP and NPP). Several sensitivity tests are presented: we assess consecutively the impacts of the level at which the vegetation is simulated (PFTs or species), the spatial resolution and the initial land cover (potential or human-induced). First, we show simulations over the whole Congo basin at a 0.5◦ spatial resolution. Then, we present high-resolution simulations (1 km) carried out over different areas of the Congo basin, notably the DRC part of the WWF Lake Tele – Lake Tumba Landscape. Studied in the BIOSERF project, this area is characterized by a forest-savannah mosaic but also by swamp and flooded forest. In addition, forward transient projections of the model driven with the outputs of about thirty global cli- mate models (GCMs) from the new Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) will permit to outline the likely response of carbon pools to changing climate over the Congo basin during the 21th century. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOptimization of Biomass-Fuelled Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) Systems Integrated with Subcritical or Transcritical Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs)
Maraver, Daniel; Quoilin, Sylvain ULg; Royo, Javier

in Entropy (2014), 16(5), 2433-2453

This work is focused on the thermodynamic optimization of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs), coupled with absorption or adsorption cooling units, for combined cooling heating and power (CCHP) generation from ... [more ▼]

This work is focused on the thermodynamic optimization of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs), coupled with absorption or adsorption cooling units, for combined cooling heating and power (CCHP) generation from biomass combustion. Results were obtained by modelling with the main aim of providing optimization guidelines for the operating conditions of these types of systems, specifically the subcritical or transcritical ORC, when integrated in a CCHP system to supply typical heating and cooling demands in the tertiary sector. The thermodynamic approach was complemented, to avoid its possible limitations, by the technological constraints of the expander, the heat exchangers and the pump of the ORC. The working fluids considered are: n-pentane, n-heptane, octamethyltrisiloxane, toluene and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane. In addition, the energy and environmental performance of the different optimal CCHP plants was investigated. The optimal plant from the energy and environmental point of view is the one integrated by a toluene recuperative ORC, although it is limited to a development with a turbine type expander. Also, the trigeneration plant could be developed in an energy and environmental efficient way with an n-pentane recuperative ORC and a volumetric type expander. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLate Night, la danse de la déperdition
Delhalle, Nancy ULg

in Alternatives Théâtrales (2014), (120),

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
See detailCROSSROADS - magazine sonore des musiques noires US
Sacré, Robert ULg

Diverse speeche and writing (2014)

émission radio hebdomadaire diffusée sur EQUINOXE FM 100.1 (on line via www.equinoxefm.be) : tous les mercredis de 18 à 20h : contenu : blues,R&B,Soul, gospel, Zydeco, jazz

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLatitudinal structure of the Venus O2 infrared airglow: A signature of small-scale dynamical processes in the upper atmosphere
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Soret, Lauriane ULg; Piccioni, Giuseppe et al

in Icarus (2014), 236

Images of the nightside limb of Venus have been obtained in the northern hemisphere with the VIRTIS multispectral infrared imager on board Venus Express between April 2006 and October 2008. We analyze the ... [more ▼]

Images of the nightside limb of Venus have been obtained in the northern hemisphere with the VIRTIS multispectral infrared imager on board Venus Express between April 2006 and October 2008. We analyze the latitudinal distribution of the O2(a1D) airglow limb profiles at 1.27 lm to characterize its distribution and variability. We show that the instantaneous structure of the emission is very different from the statistical global view of an enhanced emission near the equator, decreasing in brightness and slightly increasing in altitude toward the poles. The peak intensity of the limb profiles varies by a factor up to 50 between the brightest spots and the darkest regions. The bright airglow spots correspond to regions of enhanced downward flow of oxygen atoms originating from the dayside. Considerable variations in brightness and morphology are observed in the altitude–latitudinal distribution over a 24-h period. Analysis of the limb profiles indicates that secondary airglow peaks located at altitudes higher than the mean value of 96 km are observed on about 30% of the latitudinal cuts, but they are concentrated in narrow latitude areas extending over a few hundred kilometers. Most of them occur in transition regions between two altitude regimes in the 50 to 60 N region, possibly associated with the drop of the cloud top altitude observed equatorward of the ‘‘cold collar’’. We interpret these results as an indication that the strength of vertical transport in this mesosphere–thermosphere transition region is very variable both in location and time. This variability, also observed in nadir airglow images and wind measurements, is a key characteristic of the mesosphere–thermosphere transition region. It may be caused by fluctuations of the global day-to-night circulation generated by gravity waves. We show with a one dimensional model that local enhancements of eddy transport is a possibility. This variability is currently not accounted for by global circulation models that predict a single stable region of enhanced airglow in the vicinity of the antisolar point. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTime variations of O2(a1Delta) nightglow spots on the Venus nightside and dynamics of the upper mesosphere
Soret, Lauriane ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Piccioni, Giuseppe et al

in Icarus (2014), 237

The dynamical regime of the Venus upper atmosphere is mainly decomposed into three regions. The first one, located below 65 km of altitude is governed by the retrograde superrotational zonal (RSZ ... [more ▼]

The dynamical regime of the Venus upper atmosphere is mainly decomposed into three regions. The first one, located below 65 km of altitude is governed by the retrograde superrotational zonal (RSZ) circulation. The second region above 130 km is dominated by the subsolar to antisolar (SS–AS) circulation. The dynamics of the transition region in between are still not fully understood. However, the O2(a1D) nightglow emission at 1.27 lm, whose emitting layer is located at 96 km, can be used as a tracer of the dynamics in this transition region and the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS-M on board Venus Express, orbiting Venus since April 2006, acquired a large amount of nadir observations at this wavelength. Several previous studies showed that the O2(a1D) nightglow emission is statistically located near the antisolar point. In this study, individual VIRTIS-M nadir observations have been analyzed to investigate the variability of the phenomenon. Bright patches of 1.27 lm airglow have been extracted from every observation. It appears that the location of the bright patch is highly variable, even though the brightest patches occur near the antisolar point. Nadir observations have also been divided into time series, allowing generating animations to follow the intensity and the displacement of bright patches over time. Apparent wind velocities and characteristic decay/rise times and have been deduced from these time series. The speed of the displacements varies from 0 up to 213 m s 1, with a mean value of 54 m s 1. Owing to the high variability of the direction of the displacements both in the short and the long terms, no clear trend of a global motion at 96 km can be deduced from these observations. The mean decay time is 750 min while the mean rise time is 1550 min. The decay time can be explained as a combination of radiative decay and atomic oxygen transport. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (8 ULg)
See detailPolyplexes Targeting Angiogenesis in Cancer
Frère, Antoine ULg; Peixoto, Paul ULg; Kawalec, Michal et al

Poster (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe droit des obligations et du crédit (2011-2014)
Biquet, Christine ULg; Delforge, Cécile ULg; Lousberg, Esther ULg et al

in Leleu, Yves-Henri (Ed.) Chroniques notariales (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailINFLUENCE OF WHEY PROTEIN DENATURATION ON ADHERENCE
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Rouxhet, G. Paul; Dupont-Gillain, C. Christine et al

Conference (2014, April)

This work reports on the influence of -lactoglobulin (β-LGB) and of its denaturation on the adherence of quartz particles, taken as a model of particulate soil, on stainless steel AISI 304 with mirror ... [more ▼]

This work reports on the influence of -lactoglobulin (β-LGB) and of its denaturation on the adherence of quartz particles, taken as a model of particulate soil, on stainless steel AISI 304 with mirror finish. The substrate was soiled with quartz suspensions in water or in β-LGB solutions as such or previously heated at 75°C, and dried at room temperature or in an oven at 75°C. Cleanability was evaluated after exposure to water in a radial flow chamber. Auxiliary characterizations were the surface tension and protein concentration of the solution, surface analysis of the substrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The contact of stainless steel with -LGB led to adsorption of the protein, which dominated the composition of the organic layer with respect to contaminants initially present, and was not markedly desorbed upon rinsing. The presence of β-LGB at the quartz particle/substrate interface slightly increased the adherence, which was further increased when the protein was denatured. On the other hand, denaturation of -LGB enhanced its surfactant effect at the water/air interface. Comparison with systems investigated before suggests that the influence of protein via droplet spreading and soiling particles aggregation may be of minor importance compared to direct effects on the substrate/quartz interface. Stainless steel does not behave as a hydrophilic substrate owing to its surface contamination with organic compounds. It appears suitable to examine the influence of the initial surface state of stainless steel on its behavior regarding soiling and cleaning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailINFLUENCE OF WHEY PROTEIN DENATURATION ON ADHERENCE
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Rouxhet, G. Paul; Dupont-Gillain, C. Christine et al

in Dr Wilson, I.; Chew, Y.M.J. (Eds.) Fouling and Cleaning in Food Processing (2014, April)

This work reports on the influence of -lactoglobulin (β-LGB) and of its denaturation on the adherence of quartz particles, taken as a model of particulate soil, on stainless steel AISI 304 with mirror ... [more ▼]

This work reports on the influence of -lactoglobulin (β-LGB) and of its denaturation on the adherence of quartz particles, taken as a model of particulate soil, on stainless steel AISI 304 with mirror finish. The substrate was soiled with quartz suspensions in water or in β-LGB solutions as such or previously heated at 75°C, and dried at room temperature or in an oven at 75°C. Cleanability was evaluated after exposure to water in a radial flow chamber. Auxiliary characterizations were the surface tension and protein concentration of the solution, surface analysis of the substrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The contact of stainless steel with -LGB led to adsorption of the protein, which dominated the composition of the organic layer with respect to contaminants initially present, and was not markedly desorbed upon rinsing. The presence of β-LGB at the quartz particle/substrate interface slightly increased the adherence, which was further increased when the protein was denatured. On the other hand, denaturation of -LGB enhanced its surfactant effect at the water/air interface. Comparison with systems investigated before suggests that the influence of protein via droplet spreading and soiling particles aggregation may be of minor importance compared to direct effects on the substrate/quartz interface. Stainless steel does not behave as a hydrophilic substrate owing to its surface contamination with organic compounds. It appears suitable to examine the influence of the initial surface state of stainless steel on its behavior regarding soiling and cleaning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results
Simon, Donald; Borguet, Sébastien ULg; Léonard, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines & Power (2014), 136(4), 041201

Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem ... [more ▼]

Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (Pro- DiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate, and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe nouveau fichier écologique des essences. Pourquoi et comment ?
Claessens, Hugues ULg; Bifolchi, Eva; Cordier, Sophie ULg et al

in Forêt Wallonne (2014), (129), 60-70

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)