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See detailLa néphropathie tubulo-interstitielle aiguë: une cause rare d’insuffisance rénale aiguë
Bouquegneau, A.; Longton, J.; Bovy, Christophe ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65(7-8), 459-463

We report the case of an acute renal failure due to an acute interstitial nephropathy (ATIN) induced by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Even though this pathology is a rare cause of acute ... [more ▼]

We report the case of an acute renal failure due to an acute interstitial nephropathy (ATIN) induced by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Even though this pathology is a rare cause of acute renal failure, it still requires special attention in view of the fact that it induces a high risk of acute morbidity but it also can evolve into chronic renal failure. Its differential diagnosis with other causes of acute renal failure becomes essential because of the different therapeutic care. In this article, we are going to briefly sum up the reasoning to adopt in order to diagnose an acute renal failure. [less ▲]

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See detailFire Design of Steel Structures : Eurocode 1: Actions on structures. Part 1-2: Actions on structures exposed to fire: Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures: Part 1-2: Structural fire design
Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg; Vila Real, Paulo

Book published by Ernst & Sohn (2010)

This book explains and illustrates the rules that are given in the Eurocodes for designing steel structures subjected to fire. After the first introductory chapter, Chapter 2 explains how to calculate the ... [more ▼]

This book explains and illustrates the rules that are given in the Eurocodes for designing steel structures subjected to fire. After the first introductory chapter, Chapter 2 explains how to calculate the mechanical actions (loads) in the fire situation based on the information given in EN 1990 and EN 1991. Chapter 3 presents the models to be used to represent the thermal actions created by the fire. Chapter 4 describes the procedures to be used to calculate the temperature of the steelwork from the temperature of the compartment and Chapter 5 shows how the information given in EN 1993-1-2 is used to determine the load bearing capacity of the steel structure. The methods use to evaluate the fire resistance of bolted and welded connections are described in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 describes a computer program called ‘Elefire-EN’ which is based on the simple calculation model given in the Eurocode and allows designers to quickly and accurately calculate the performance of steel components in the fire situation. Chapter 9 looks at the issues that a designer may be faced with when assessing the fire resistance of a complete building. This is done via a case study and addresses most of the concepts presented in the earlier Chapters. Finally the annexes give basic information on the thermal and mechanical properties for both carbon steel and stainless steel. The concepts and fire engineering procedures given in the Eurocodes may seem complex to those more familiar with the prescriptive approach. This publication sets out the design process in a logical manner giving practical and helpful advice and easy to follow worked examples that will allow designers to exploit the benefits of this new approach to fire design. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrating collective work aspects in the design process: An analysis case study of the robotic surgery. Using communication as a sign of fundamental change
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg

in Palanque, Philippe; Vanderdonck; Winckler (Eds.) Human Error, Safety and System Development (2010)

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See detailUne chênaie n'est pas l'autre : analyse des contextes sylvicoles du chêne en forêt wallonne
Claessens, Hugues ULg; Perin, Jérôme ULg; Latte, Nicolas ULg et al

in Forêt Wallonne (2010), 108(sept-oct), 3-18

Le chêne n’est pas une essence facile à conduire vers la production de bois de qualité. Pour beaucoup d’entre eux, leur forme a été conditionnée il y a plus d’un siècle au sein de peuplements bien ... [more ▼]

Le chêne n’est pas une essence facile à conduire vers la production de bois de qualité. Pour beaucoup d’entre eux, leur forme a été conditionnée il y a plus d’un siècle au sein de peuplements bien différents de ce qu’ils sont devenus car originellement adaptés aux conditions socio-économiques qui prévalaient aux XIXe et au début du XXe siècle. Mais dans bien des cas, la sylviculture que l’on mène maintenant est encore sous la contrainte de ce passé. Cet article envisage les contextes « historico-sylvicoles » des chênaies de Wallonie à la lumière de leur état actuel. [less ▲]

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See detailOn a class of micromechanical damage models with initial stresses for geomaterials
Levasseur, Séverine ULg; Collin, Frédéric ULg; Charlier, Robert ULg et al

in Mechanics Research Communications (2010), 37

In this paper, we extend a class of micromechanical damage models by including initial stresses. The proposed approach is based on the solution of the Eshelby inhomogeneous inclusion problem in the ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we extend a class of micromechanical damage models by including initial stresses. The proposed approach is based on the solution of the Eshelby inhomogeneous inclusion problem in the presence of a prestress (in the matrix), adapted for elastic voided media. The closed form expression of the corresponding energy potential is used as the basis of various isotropic damage models corresponding to three standard homogenization schemes. These models are illustrated by considering isotropic tensile loadings with different initial stresses. Finally, still in the isotropic context, we provide an interpretation of the macroscopic damage model formulated by Halm-Dragon (1996) by briefly connecting it to the present study. [less ▲]

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See detailDisorders of consciousness: Moving from passive to resting state and active paradigms
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 1(1), 193203

Following coma, some patients will recover wakefulness without signs of consciousness (i.e., vegetative state) or may show nonreflexive movements but with no ability for functional communication (i.e ... [more ▼]

Following coma, some patients will recover wakefulness without signs of consciousness (i.e., vegetative state) or may show nonreflexive movements but with no ability for functional communication (i.e., minimally conscious state). Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state. The increasing use of fMRI and EEG tools permits the clinical characterization of these patients to be improved. We first discuss “resting metabolism” and “passive activation” paradigms, used in neuroimaging and evoked potential studies, which merely identify neural activation reflecting “automatic” processing—that is, occurring without the patient’s willful intervention. Secondly, we present an alternative approach consisting of instructing subjects to imagine well-defined sensorymotor or cognitive-mental actions. This strategy reflects volitional neural activation and, hence, witnesses awareness. Finally, we present results on blood-oxgen-level-dependent “default mode network”/resting state studies that might be a promising tool in the diagnosis of these challenging patients. [less ▲]

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See detailReport of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects.
Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2010), 4(4), 355-66

The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of ... [more ▼]

The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts. This first section addresses definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects of anti-TNF therapy failure, including pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies and immune and non-immune mediated clearance of anti-TNF mAbs. The second section concerns the biological roles of TNF and TNF antagonists, including mechanisms of action of anti-TNF agents, and discuss hypothesis regarding their failures and phenomenon of paradoxical inflammation, including the potential role of TNF independent inflammatory pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailThe second European evidence-based Consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: Definitions and diagnosis.
Van Assche, Gert; Dignass, Axel; Panes, Julian et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2010), 4(1), 7-27

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See detailHydro-mechanical modelling of the Excavation Damaged Zone around an underground excavation at Mont Terri Rock Laboratory
Levasseur, Séverine ULg; Charlier, Robert ULg; Frieg, Bernd et al

in International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences (2010), 47(3), 414-425

A zone with significant irreversible deformations and significant changes in flow and transport properties is expected to be formed in indurated clay around underground excavations. The stress ... [more ▼]

A zone with significant irreversible deformations and significant changes in flow and transport properties is expected to be formed in indurated clay around underground excavations. The stress perturbation around the excavation could lead to a significant increase of the permeability, related to diffuse and/or localized crack propagation in the material. The main objective of the study is to model these processes at large scale in order to assess their impacts on the performance of radioactive waste geological repositories. This paper concerns more particularly the hydro-mechanical modelling of a long term dilatometer experiment performed in Mont Terri Rock Laboratory in Switzerland within the Selfrac Project. The proposed model defines the permeability as a function of the aperture of the cracks that are generated during the excavation. With this model, the permeability tensor becomes anisotropic. Advantages and drawbacks of this approach are described thanks to the results of the Selfrac long term dilatometer experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide meta-analysis increases to 71 the number of confirmed Crohn's disease susceptibility loci.
Franke, Andre; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C et al

in Nature Genetics (2010), 42(12), 1118-25

We undertook a meta-analysis of six Crohn's disease genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising 6,333 affected individuals (cases) and 15,056 controls and followed up the top association signals in ... [more ▼]

We undertook a meta-analysis of six Crohn's disease genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising 6,333 affected individuals (cases) and 15,056 controls and followed up the top association signals in 15,694 cases, 14,026 controls and 414 parent-offspring trios. We identified 30 new susceptibility loci meeting genome-wide significance (P < 5 x 10). A series of in silico analyses highlighted particular genes within these loci and, together with manual curation, implicated functionally interesting candidate genes including SMAD3, ERAP2, IL10, IL2RA, TYK2, FUT2, DNMT3A, DENND1B, BACH2 and TAGAP. Combined with previously confirmed loci, these results identify 71 distinct loci with genome-wide significant evidence for association with Crohn's disease. [less ▲]

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See detailVaccinations in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.
Rahier, Jean-Francois; Moutschen, Michel ULg; Van Gompel, Alfons et al

in Rheumatology (2010), 49(10), 1815-27

Patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) such as RA, IBD or psoriasis, are at increased risk of infection, partially because of the disease itself, but mostly because of treatment with ... [more ▼]

Patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) such as RA, IBD or psoriasis, are at increased risk of infection, partially because of the disease itself, but mostly because of treatment with immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive drugs. In spite of their elevated risk for vaccine-preventable disease, vaccination coverage in IMID patients is surprisingly low. This review summarizes current literature data on vaccine safety and efficacy in IMID patients treated with immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory drugs and formulates best-practice recommendations on vaccination in this population. Especially in the current era of biological therapies, including TNF-blocking agents, special consideration should be given to vaccination strategies in IMID patients. Clinical evidence indicates that immunization of IMID patients does not increase clinical or laboratory parameters of disease activity. Live vaccines are contraindicated in immunocompromized individuals, but non-live vaccines can safely be given. Although the reduced quality of the immune response in patients under immunotherapy may have a negative impact on vaccination efficacy in this population, adequate humoral response to vaccination in IMID patients has been demonstrated for hepatitis B, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Vaccination status is best checked and updated before the start of immunomodulatory therapy: live vaccines are not contraindicated at that time and inactivated vaccines elicit an optimal immune response in immunocompetent individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-random genomic integration - an intrinsic property of retrogenes in Drosophila?
Metta, Muralidhar ULg; Schlotterer, C.

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2010), 10(1), 114

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Drosophila X-chromosome shows a significant underrepresentation of genes with male-biased gene expression (demasculinization). This trend is matched by retrogenes, which ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Drosophila X-chromosome shows a significant underrepresentation of genes with male-biased gene expression (demasculinization). This trend is matched by retrogenes, which typically have a male biased gene expression pattern and show a significant movement bias from X-chromosomes to autosomes. It is currently assumed that these patterns are best explained by selection, either mediated by male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) or sexually antagonistic forces. We scrutinized the evolutionary dynamics of retroposition by focusing on retrogenes for which the parental copy has degenerated. RESULTS: Consistent with a functional substitution of the degenerated gene by the retrogene, patterns of sequence evolution and gene expression were similar between retroposed and parental genes. Like previous studies, our set of retrogenes showed a significant movement off the X-chromosome. In contrast to data sets where retroposition caused gene duplication, the genes in our study showed primarily female-biased or unbiased gene expression. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, the biased transposition pattern cannot be explained by MSCI and probably not by sexual antagonism. Rather, we propose that the movement away from the X-chromosome represents a general property of retroposition in Drosophila. [less ▲]

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See detailDiversity of monomers in nonribosomal peptides: towards the prediction of origin and biological activity.
Caboche, Segolene; Leclere, Valerie; Pupin, Maude et al

in Journal of bacteriology (2010), 192(19), 5143-50

Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are molecules produced by microorganisms that have a broad spectrum of biological activities and pharmaceutical applications (e.g., antibiotic, immunomodulating, and antitumor ... [more ▼]

Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are molecules produced by microorganisms that have a broad spectrum of biological activities and pharmaceutical applications (e.g., antibiotic, immunomodulating, and antitumor activities). One particularity of the NRPs is the biodiversity of their monomers, extending far beyond the 20 proteogenic amino acid residues. Norine, a comprehensive database of NRPs, allowed us to review for the first time the main characteristics of the NRPs and especially their monomer biodiversity. Our analysis highlighted a significant similarity relationship between NRPs synthesized by bacteria and those isolated from metazoa, especially from sponges, supporting the hypothesis that some NRPs isolated from sponges are actually synthesized by symbiotic bacteria rather than by the sponges themselves. A comparison of peptide monomeric compositions as a function of biological activity showed that some monomers are specific to a class of activities. An analysis of the monomer compositions of peptide products predicted from genomic information (metagenomics and high-throughput genome sequencing) or of new peptides detected by mass spectrometry analysis applied to a culture supernatant can provide indications of the origin of a peptide and/or its biological activity. [less ▲]

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See detailSevere skin lesions cause patients with inflammatory bowel disease to discontinue anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.
Rahier, Jean*-Francois; Buche, Sebastien; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent et al

in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of The American Gastroenterological Association (2010), 8(12), 1048-55

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Psoriasiform and eczematiform lesions are associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapies. We assessed clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes of skin ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Psoriasiform and eczematiform lesions are associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapies. We assessed clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes of skin disease in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that presented with psoriasiform and eczematiform lesions induced by anti-TNF-alpha agents. METHODS: We studied 85 patients (69 with Crohn's disease, 15 with ulcerative colitis, and 1 with indeterminate colitis; 62 women) with inflammatory skin lesions (62 psoriasiform and 23 eczematiform lesions). RESULTS: Twenty-four patients had a history of inflammatory skin lesions and 15 had a familial history of inflammatory skin disease. Locations of eczematiform lesions varied whereas scalp and flexural varieties were mostly psoriasiform. Skin lesions emerged but inflammatory bowel disease was quiescent in 69 patients following treatment with any type of anti-TNF-alpha agent (60 with infliximab, 20 with adalimumab, and 5 with certolizumab). Topical therapy resulted in partial or total remission in 41 patients. Patients with psoriasiform lesions that were resistant to topical therapy and that changed anti-TNF-alpha therapies once or twice developed recurring lesions. Overall, uncontrolled skin lesions caused 29 patients to stop taking TNF-alpha inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Inflammatory skin lesions following therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors occurred most frequently among women and patients with a personal or familial history of inflammatory skin disease; lesions did not correlate with intestinal disease activity. Recurring and intense skin lesions caused 34% of patients in this study to discontinue use of anti-TNF-alpha agents. [less ▲]

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See detailNitrogen and carbon cycling in the North Sea and exchange with the North Atlantic-A model study, Part II: Carbon budget and fluxes
Kuhn, Wilfried; Paetsch, Johannes; Thomas, Helmuth et al

in Continental Shelf Research (2010), 30(16), 1701-1716

The 3-d coupled physical-biogeochemical model ECOHAM (version 3) was applied to the Northwest-European Shelf (47 degrees 41'-63 degrees 53'N, 15 degrees 5'W-13 degrees 55'E) for the years 1993-1996 ... [more ▼]

The 3-d coupled physical-biogeochemical model ECOHAM (version 3) was applied to the Northwest-European Shelf (47 degrees 41'-63 degrees 53'N, 15 degrees 5'W-13 degrees 55'E) for the years 1993-1996. Carbon fluxes were calculated for the years 1995 and 1996 for the inner shelf region, the North Sea (511,725 km(2)). This period was chosen because it corresponds to a shift from a very high winter-time North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) in 1994/1995, to an extremely low one in 1995/1996, with consequences for the North Sea physics and biogeochemistry. During the first half of 1996, the observed mean SST was about 1 degrees C lower than in 1995; in the southern part of the North Sea the difference was even larger (up to 3 degrees C). Due to a different wind regime, the normally prevailing anti-clockwise circulation, as found in winter 1995, was replaced by more complicated circulation patterns in winter 1996. Decreased precipitation over the drainage area of the continental rivers led to a reduction in the total (inorganic and organic) riverine carbon load to the North Sea from 476 Gmol C yr(-1) in 1995 to 340 Gmol C yr(-1) in 1996. In addition, the North Sea took up 503 Gmol C yr(-1) of CO2 from the atmosphere. According to our calculations, the North Sea was a sink for atmospheric CO2, at a rate of 0.98 mol C m(-2) yr(-1), for both years. The North Sea is divided into two sub-systems: the shallow southern North Sea (SNS; 190,765 km(2)) and the deeper northern North Sea (NNS; 320,960 km2). According to our findings the SNS is a net-autotrophic system (net ecosystem production NEP > 0) but released CO2 to the atmosphere: 159 Gmol C yr(-1) in 1995 and 59 Gmol C yr(-1) in 1996. There, the temperature-driven release of CO2 outcompetes the biological CO2 drawdown. In the NNS, where respiratory processes prevail (NEP < 0), 662 and 562 Gmol C yr(-1) were taken up from the atmosphere in 1995 and 1996. respectively. Stratification separates the productive, upper layer from the deeper layers of the water column where respiration/remineralization takes place. Duration and stability of the stratification are determined by the meteorological conditions, in relation to the NAO. Our results suggest that this mechanism controlling the nutrient supply to the upper layer in the northern and central North Sea has a larger impact on the carbon fluxes than changes in lateral transport due to NAOI variations. The North Sea as a whole imports organic carbon and exports inorganic carbon across the outer boundaries, and was found to be net-heterotrophic, more markedly in 1996 than in 1995. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailUnusual biological association event within the Late Frasnian Crisis
Denayer, Julien ULg; Poty, Edouard ULg

in Abstract volume of the Third International Palaeontological Congress (2010)

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See detailLa nouvelle économie sociale et solidaire : une repolitisation du quotidien ?
Frère, Bruno ULg

Article for general public (2010)

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