Publications ORBi OA
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailDéfigurer la littérature ou l’impossible témoignage
Servais, Christine ULg

in Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme (2009), 122124-123-

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA continuous time approach to Robbins' problem of minimizing the expected rank
Swan, Yvik ULg; Bruss, F. Thomas

in Journal of Applied Probability (2009), 46

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCharacterising urban morphology with spectral unmixing and spatial metrics: a case study on Dublin
Canters, Frank; Van de Voorde, Tim; Binard, Marc ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 24th International Cartographic Conference (ICC 2009), (2009)

In today’s urbanising world, effective urban management and planning strategies are needed to temper the impact of urban change processes on the natural and human environment. To develop and monitor such ... [more ▼]

In today’s urbanising world, effective urban management and planning strategies are needed to temper the impact of urban change processes on the natural and human environment. To develop and monitor such strategies, and to assess their spatial impact, analysing changes in urban structure is essential. Data from earth observation satellites provide regular information on urban development and, as such, may contribute to the mapping and monitoring of cities and the modelling of urban dynamics. Especially images of medium resolution (Landsat, SPOT, …), which are cheap, widely available and often part of extensive historic archives, offer a wealth of information that may be useful for urban monitoring purposes. The lower resolution of this type of imagery, however, hampers the study of urban morphology and change processes at a more detailed, intra-urban level. Spectral unmixing approaches, which allow characterising land-cover distribution at sub-pixel level, may partly compensate for this lack of spatial detail, and may render medium-resolution imagery more useful for urban studies. The main research question addressed in this paper is how medium-resolution imagery could be used to describe urban morphology, by combining spectral unmixing approaches with spatial metrics. Spatial metrics derived from satellite imagery may be useful to quantify structural characteristics of expanding cities, and may provide indications of functional land use. In this study, we develop a set of urban metrics for use on continuous sealed surface data produced by sub-pixel classification of Landsat ETM+ imagery. Two sub-pixel classification approaches are examined for that purpose. In a first approach, we use a linear spectral mixture model with a vegetation and a non-vegetation endmember to deconvolve each pixel’s spectrum into fractional abundances of the two end member spectra, which are determined by visualising mixture space with principal component analysis. In a second approach, we use a linear regression model to estimate the proportion of vegetation cover within each Landsat pixel. In both approaches, an urban mask is used to indicate pixels belonging to urban land cover. Only pixels within the urban mask are subjected to sub-pixel classification. We hereby assume that the urban area does not contain bare soil and that the area of a pixel not covered by vegetation fully consists of sealed surface cover. The resulting sealed surface proportion map is then used to characterise urban morphology and land use by means of the shape of the cumulative frequency distribution of the estimated sealed surface fractions within a building block. A transformed logistic function is fitted to this distribution with a least-squares approach to obtain function parameters that are used as variables in a supervised classification approach, together with spatially explicit metrics (spatial variance and Moran’s I). Our study demonstrates that images from medium resolution sensors can be used to characterise intra-urban morphology, and that the structure of a building block as described by the proposed metrics gives an indication of its membership to certain morphological/functional urban classes. In future research we will incorporate socio-economic data in the metric analysis to further improve the distinction of urban land-use categories. The spatial metrics approach developed in this study will be used in experiments to improve the calibration of the MOLAND urban growth model, which is currently calibrated with historical land-use maps available for approximately 10-year intervals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSpur Gear Vibration Mitigation by Means of Energy Pumping
Scagliarini, Giorgio; Viguié, Régis ULg; Kerschen, Gaëtan ULg et al

in 27th International Modal Analysis Conference, Orlando, 2009 (2009)

The dynamic behaviour of a spur gear pair can be studied in terms of transmission error considering a single degree of freedom system. Thus, a mechanical system exhibiting combined parametric excitation ... [more ▼]

The dynamic behaviour of a spur gear pair can be studied in terms of transmission error considering a single degree of freedom system. Thus, a mechanical system exhibiting combined parametric excitation and clearance type nonlinearity is examined by means of numerical integrations and continuation methods in an effort to explain its complex behaviour, as it is commonly observed in the steady state forced response of rotating machines. The specific case of a preloaded mechanical oscillator having a periodically time varying stiffness function and subject to a symmetric backlash condition is considered. Even if such an oscillator represents the simplest model able to analyze a single spur gear pair, it exhibits a complex dynamic scenario, namely jumps, superharmonics, subharmonics resonances and dynamic bifurcations. In order to reduce the vibration of the system, a nonlinear absorber is applied. Unlike common linear and weakly nonlinear systems, systems with strongly nonlinear elements are able to react efficiently on the amplitude characteristics of the external forcing in a wide range of frequencies. A strongly and essentially nonlinear, lightweight, with cubic stiffness oscillator is then attached to the main nonlinear system under periodic parametric forcing and the feasibility of a possible application of this nonlinear energy sink (NES) for vibration absorption and mitigation is checked. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamiliar person recognition: do we remember more episodic memories from faces than from names?
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2009)

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember/Know paradigm the proportions of episodic memories recalled following the recognition of famous faces and names (Conditions) were assessed. Presented faces and names were previously judged by an independent group of participants as eliciting an equivalent level of familiarity. Nevertheless significant differences between the two conditions appeared in hit and false alarm rates. However, present results showed no significant difference in the recollection of personal memories (Remember responses conditionalized on the hits), following familiar faces compared with familiar names recognition. This finding contrasts with recent accounts assuming that faces are more prone to yield episodic memories than other cues to person identity. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (12 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGBS - Chapître 32
Melin, Pierrette ULg

in Alexander, Sophie; Debiève, F.; Delvoye, P. (Eds.) et al Guide de Consultation Prénatale (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDynamical Modeling of the Deep Impact Dust Ejecta Cloud
Bonev, T.; Ageorges, N.; Bagnulo, S. et al

in Käufl, H. U.; Sterken, C. (Eds.) Deep Impact as a World Observatory Event: Synergies in Space, Time, and Wavelength (2009)

The collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P/Tempel 1 generated a bright cloud of dust which dissipated during several days after the impact. The brightness variations of this cloud and the changes of its ... [more ▼]

The collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P/Tempel 1 generated a bright cloud of dust which dissipated during several days after the impact. The brightness variations of this cloud and the changes of its position and shape are governed by the physical properties of the dust grains. We use a Monte Carlo model to describe the evolution of the post-impact dust plume. The results of our dynamical simulations are compared to the data obtained with FORS2footnote{FORS stands for \underline{FO}cal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO).} to derive the particle size distribution and the total amount of material contained in the dust ejecta cloud. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailESO Spectrophotometry of Comet 9P/Tempel 1
Weiler, M.; Rauer, H.; Sterken, C. et al

in Käufl, H. U.; Sterken, C. (Eds.) Deep Impact as a World Observatory Event: Synergies in Space, Time, and Wavelength (2009)

The Deep Impact target comet 9P/Tempel 1 was observed by means of long-slit spectroscopy from two nights before impact up to eight nights after impact, using the ESO VLT UT1, UT2, and ESO NTT telescopes ... [more ▼]

The Deep Impact target comet 9P/Tempel 1 was observed by means of long-slit spectroscopy from two nights before impact up to eight nights after impact, using the ESO VLT UT1, UT2, and ESO NTT telescopes. Spectra covering the complete optical wavelength range were obtained, and information at different position angles in the coma was collected. The data were used to study the gas and dust activity of comet 9P/Tempel 1. Gas production rates before and after impact and the amount of material in the impact cloud were determined. The pre-impact Afρ parameter, the dust production rate and the dust-to-gas mass ratio were derived. A variation of the cometary gas activity with rotation of the nucleus was detected. A difference in the variation of the brightness of the CN gas emission band compared to the variation of the emissions by C_2, C_3, and NH_2 in the inner coma suggests compositional differences between different parts of the surface of comet 9P/Tempel 1's nucleus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEmerging Patterns of Depoliticization and Engagement to Inform the Future of Science and Technology Studies: A Case Study in Nanotechnologies
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2009)

In this paper, we address the issue of the future of a particular field of research in social science: Science and Technology Studies (STS). Although this is a very young research field, its history is ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we address the issue of the future of a particular field of research in social science: Science and Technology Studies (STS). Although this is a very young research field, its history is already diverse and its evolutions are fastly moving on. Its rapid expansion and its characteristic feature of crossing disciplinary boundaries are making it an interesting case to study, which takes a particular place in the overall history – and future – of social changes. As we shall indicate, STS have an increasing committment for the resolution of sociotechnical controversies. In this paper, we problematise this particular position by underlying the implicit politics of STS research and how they will shape the future of that particular field. Our approach is threefold. First, we give a brief overview of the history of the field and we point out the main evolutions since the developement of the Social Construction of Technology approach (SCOT) in the 1980s that long influenced the field. By doing so, we underline the epistemological critical tradition that gave the field some of its particularities that we address. We show how this tradition brought important insights of “political” nature within the development of the field. Second, our ambition is to highlight new patterns of evolution of the STS field, emphasizing the trends towards both a greater depoliticisation and a more engaged research. By “depoliticisation”, we intend to analyse the dynamics of institutionalisation of the field which adopts resources and tools to legitimate itself among the social scientific community. By “engaged” research, we will explore the evolutions of the STS field as inherently political. The field does have an implicit statement in favor of changing social order and an increasing willingness to actually influence that social change. In that respect, research projects in STS often have underlying politics, as we shall demonstrate. Third, we give a concrete example of these new patterns occuring, relying on the growing importance of nanotechnologies, both in the STS literature and research projects. We consider this case study to be intertwined with the development of STS as a field of research. In that sense, we stress that nanotechnologies happened to be a powerful tool for legitimation for the STS community. Therefore, we — as STS scholars — suggest instrumentalizing the interest we have in nanotechnologies in order to observe the evolutions of our field of research. Then, nanotechnologies will constitute an interesting ground to perform a test that will show depoliticisation and engagement as patterning the STS field. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombining an original method for preserving RNA expression in situ with an effetive RNA method makes it possible to study gene expression in any banana fruit tissue.
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Fruits (2009), 64(3), 127-137

Introduction. RNA isolation is a prerequisite to studying gene expression in banana and to understanding changes occurring in response to the environment. Standard extraction methods do not efficiently ... [more ▼]

Introduction. RNA isolation is a prerequisite to studying gene expression in banana and to understanding changes occurring in response to the environment. Standard extraction methods do not efficiently extract RNA from plants such as banana, with high levels of phenolics, carbohydrates, or other compounds that bind to and/or coprecipitate with RNA. Materials and methods. Five to seven RNA extraction methods were compared. Four crowntissue storage methods were also compared. cDNA-AFLP was used to ensure that the obtained RNA was of sufficient quality for molecular applications and that RNA expression was unaltered by in situ storage. Results and discussion. The modified hot-borate method proved to be the best RNA extraction method, allowing high yields of good quality, undegraded RNA from the crown, fruit peel and pulp at all stages of ripening. The RNA obtained by this method was of sufficient quality for molecular applications such as cDNA-AFLP that give highly reproducible results. Freeze-drying of fresh tissues and tissue conservation in hot-borate buffer, two original storage methods, appear appropriate for preserving RNA in situ without ultra-low temperature. The RNA obtained was of high quality, undegraded, and useful for all downstream applications. The genome expression profile obtained by cDNA-AFLP analysis was unaltered by these methods for storing collected tissues. Conclusion. By applying all the suggested procedures in this work, it is possible to store and study gene expression in any banana fruit tissue, whatever the maturity stage, without affecting the RNA expression level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa banane: de son origine à sa commercialisation
Lassois, Ludivine ULg; Busogoro, J. P.; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2009), 13(4), 575-586

Cultivated bananas are giant herbaceous plants within the genus Musa. They are both sterile and parthenocarpic. There are well over a thousand domesticated Musa cultivars, they are mostly triploid (a few ... [more ▼]

Cultivated bananas are giant herbaceous plants within the genus Musa. They are both sterile and parthenocarpic. There are well over a thousand domesticated Musa cultivars, they are mostly triploid (a few are diploid or tetraploid) and are derived from crosses between two wild species, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. In terms of production, bananas are the fourth agricultural product after rice, wheat, and maize. They constitute the basis of food security for many people. Cropping systems vary widely around the world and contrasting objectives are encountered: consumption by the producer, sale on local or national markets, export, etc. Cooking bananas, including plantains, must be distinguished from dessert bananas, which constitute a major international trade. This international trade started only in the early 1900s but it has since grown continuously. Banana is currently the most exported fruit, in terms of both value and quantity. Despite the high genetic diversity found within the genus Musa, the export market is mainly based on single Cavendish. There are major challenges to banana production from biotic or abiotic stresses to continue to meet the criteria of sustainability, quality and yield that are imposed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNG2 and phosphacan are present in the astroglial scar after human traumatic spinal cord injury.
Buss, Armin; Pech, Katrin; Kakulas, Byron A et al

in BMC Neurology (2009), 9

BACKGROUND: A major class of axon growth-repulsive molecules associated with CNS scar tissue is the family of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A major class of axon growth-repulsive molecules associated with CNS scar tissue is the family of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has demonstrated rapid re-expression of CSPGs at and around the lesion site. The pharmacological digestion of CSPGs in such lesion models results in substantially enhanced axonal regeneration and a significant functional recovery. The potential therapeutic relevance of interfering with CSPG expression or function following experimental injuries seems clear, however, the spatio-temporal pattern of expression of individual members of the CSPG family following human spinal cord injury is only poorly defined. In the present correlative investigation, the expression pattern of CSPG family members NG2, neurocan, versican and phosphacan was studied in the human spinal cord. METHODS: An immunohistochemical investigation in post mortem samples of control and lesioned human spinal cords was performed. All patients with traumatic SCI had been clinically diagnosed as having "complete" injuries and presented lesions of the maceration type. RESULTS: In sections from control spinal cord, NG2 immunoreactivity was restricted to stellate-shaped cells corresponding to oligodendrocyte precursor cells. The distribution patterns of phosphacan, neurocan and versican in control human spinal cord parenchyma were similar, with a fine reticular pattern being observed in white matter (but also located in gray matter for phosphacan). Neurocan staining was also associated with blood vessel walls. Furthermore, phosphacan, neurocan and versican were present in the myelin sheaths of ventral and dorsal nerve roots axons. After human SCI, NG2 and phosphacan were both detected in the evolving astroglial scar. Neurocan and versican were detected exclusively in the lesion epicentre, being associated with infiltrating Schwann cells in the myelin sheaths of invading peripheral nerve fibres from lesioned dorsal roots. CONCLUSION: NG2 and phosphacan were both present in the evolving astroglial scar and, therefore, might play an important role in the blockade of successful CNS regeneration. Neurocan and versican, however, were located at the lesion epicentre, associated with Schwann cell myelin on regenerating peripheral nerve fibres, a distribution that was unlikely to contribute to failed CNS axon regeneration. The present data points to the importance of such correlative investigations for demonstrating the clinical relevance of experimental data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA pressure dependent bone remodeling model for application in orthodontics
Mengoni, Marlène ULg; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe ULg

in XXIInd Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailRobustmilk - Du lait plus sain à partir de vaches plus saines
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg

Article for general public (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, mental retardation, and electrolyte imbalance (SeSAME syndrome) caused by mutations in KCNJ10.
Scholl, Ute I; Choi, Murim; Liu, Tiewen et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009), 106(14), 5842-7

We describe members of 4 kindreds with a previously unrecognized syndrome characterized by seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, mental retardation, and electrolyte imbalance (hypokalemia, metabolic ... [more ▼]

We describe members of 4 kindreds with a previously unrecognized syndrome characterized by seizures, sensorineural deafness, ataxia, mental retardation, and electrolyte imbalance (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypomagnesemia). By analysis of linkage we localize the putative causative gene to a 2.5-Mb segment of chromosome 1q23.2-23.3. Direct DNA sequencing of KCNJ10, which encodes an inwardly rectifying K(+) channel, identifies previously unidentified missense or nonsense mutations on both alleles in all affected subjects. These mutations alter highly conserved amino acids and are absent among control chromosomes. Many of these mutations have been shown to cause loss of function in related K(+) channels. These findings demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ10 cause this syndrome, which we name SeSAME. KCNJ10 is expressed in glia in the brain and spinal cord, where it is believed to take up K(+) released by neuronal repolarization, in cochlea, where it is involved in the generation of endolymph, and on the basolateral membrane in the distal nephron. We propose that KCNJ10 is required in the kidney for normal salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule because of the need for K(+) recycling across the basolateral membrane to enable normal activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase; loss of this function accounts for the observed electrolyte defects. Mice deficient for KCNJ10 show a related phenotype with seizures, ataxia, and hearing loss, further supporting KCNJ10's role in this syndrome. These findings define a unique human syndrome, and establish the essential role of basolateral K(+) channels in renal electrolyte homeostasis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLectures « Sylvia Becerra, Anne Peltier (dir.), 2009, Risques et environnement : recherches interdisciplinaires sur la vulnérabilité des sociétés, Paris, L’Harmattan, coll. Sociologies et environnement, 575 p. »
Mormont, Marc ULg

in Développement Durable et Territoires [= DDT] (2009)

Vulnerability renews the approach of risk and strategies. This book opens many ways to deal with environmental risks

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBlockade of ethanol-induced potentiation of glycine receptors by a peptide that interferes with Gbetagamma binding.
Guzman, Leonardo; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Avila, Ariel et al

in Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (2009), 331(3), 933-9

The large intracellular loop (IL) of the glycine receptor (GlyR) interacts with various signaling proteins and plays a fundamental role in trafficking and regulation of several receptor properties ... [more ▼]

The large intracellular loop (IL) of the glycine receptor (GlyR) interacts with various signaling proteins and plays a fundamental role in trafficking and regulation of several receptor properties, including a direct interaction with Gbetagamma. In the present study, we found that mutation of basic residues in the N-terminal region of the IL reduced the binding of Gbetagamma to 21 +/- 10% of control. Two basic residues in the C-terminal region, on the other hand, contributed to a smaller extent to Gbetagamma binding. Using docking analysis, we found that both basic regions of the IL bind in nearby regions to the Gbetagamma dimer, within an area of high density of amino acids having an electronegative character. Thereafter, we generated a 17-amino acid peptide with the N-terminal sequence of the wild-type IL (RQH) that was able to inhibit the in vitro binding of Gbetagamma to GlyRs to 57 +/- 5% of control in glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays using purified proteins. More interestingly, when the peptide was intracellularly applied to human embryonic kidney 293 cells, it inhibited the Gbetagamma-mediated modulations of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel by baclofen (24 +/- 14% of control) and attenuated the GlyR potentiation by ethanol (51 +/- 10% versus 10 +/- 3%). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiophysical studies support a predicted superhelical structure with armadillo repeats for Ric-8.
Figueroa, Maximiliano ULg; Hinrichs, Maria Victoria; Bunster, Marta et al

in Protein Science : A Publication of the Protein Society (2009), 18(6), 1139-45

Ric-8 is a highly conserved cytosolic protein (MW 63 KDa) initially identified in C. elegans as an essential factor in neurotransmitter release and asymmetric cell division. Two different isoforms have ... [more ▼]

Ric-8 is a highly conserved cytosolic protein (MW 63 KDa) initially identified in C. elegans as an essential factor in neurotransmitter release and asymmetric cell division. Two different isoforms have been described in mammals, Ric-8A and Ric-8B; each possess guanine nucleotide exchange activity (GEF) on heterotrimeric G-proteins, but with different Galpha subunits specificities. To gain insight on the mechanisms involved in Ric-8 cellular functions it is essential to obtain some information about its structure. Therefore, the aim of this work was to create a structural model for Ric-8. In this case, it was not possible to construct a model based on comparison with a template structure because Ric-8 does not present sequence similarity with any other protein. Consequently, different bioinformatics approaches that include protein folding and structure prediction were used. The Ric-8 structural model is composed of 10 armadillo folding motifs, organized in a right-twisted alpha-alpha super helix. In order to validate the structural model, a His-tag fusion construct of Ric-8 was expressed in E. coli, purified by affinity and anion exchange chromatography and subjected to circular dichroism analysis (CD) and thermostability studies. Ric-8 is approximately 80% alpha helix, with a Tm of 43.1 degrees C, consistent with an armadillo-type structure such as alpha-importin, a protein composed of 10 armadillo repeats. The proposed structural model for Ric-8 is intriguing because armadillo proteins are known to interact with multiple partners and participate in diverse cellular functions. These results open the possibility of finding new protein partners for Ric-8 with new cellular functions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSélection d'espèces ligneuses adaptées à la fixation biologique de dunes au Niger
Laminou Manzo, Ousmane; Campanella, Bruno ULg; Paul, Roger ULg

in Geo-Eco-Trop (2009), 33

Seven woody species, of which five natives (Acacia senegal, A. raddiana, A. nilotica, Bauhinia rufescens, Balanites aegyptiaca) and two imported (Prosopis juliflora and P. chilensis) have been tested in ... [more ▼]

Seven woody species, of which five natives (Acacia senegal, A. raddiana, A. nilotica, Bauhinia rufescens, Balanites aegyptiaca) and two imported (Prosopis juliflora and P. chilensis) have been tested in terms of biological sand dunes fixation in the Southern east of Niger Republic. In nursery, species underwent a water stress by interrupting the watering during six days. Foliar hydration has been determined in order to evaluate their capacity to limit water loss. In a field experiment, species have been planted on a mechanically prefixed sand dune cord in order to test their ability for stabilization of sand dunes. Survival rates during the first three years have been calculated and height growth was measured. In nursery, results showed that, after six days of water stress, Acacia senegal, A. raddiana, P. chilensis and A. nilotica are the four species limiting the best the water losses. Results on site showed that the best combination in sand dunes fixation, in this zone, would be the association of one or the other of Prosopis (high survival rate and fast growth) with A. raddiana and/or A. nilotica (survival and growth relatively substantial and more important economic interest). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (1 ULg)