Publications ORBi OA
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFeasibility of a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids in dairy cattle
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Arnould, Valérie ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2010), 93(E-Suppl 1), 744

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The ... [more ▼]

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The objective was to show that a genetic evaluation for milk FA in dairy cattle is feasible in the Walloon region of Belgium and to report first results. Estimated breeding values (EBV) and associated reliabilities (REL) were computed using a multi-trait test-day animal model similar to the one used for the routine genetic evaluation for yield traits. Studied traits were first lactation test-day milk, fat and protein yields, fat (FAT) and protein contents, and content of saturated fatty acids in milk (g/100g of milk, SAT). More than 6,700,000 records were available for common production and content traits and 194,000 records were used for SAT. Used variance components were estimated using REML. The average SAT content was 2.79% with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.50%. A total of 1,707 Holstein bulls used in Walloon Region had REL superior to 0.49 for all studied traits. REL for SAT ranged from 0.53 to 0.99. A total of 1,217 bulls had REL superior to 0.74. SD of EBV for SAT was 0.20%. The maximum and minimum SAT EBV values were 0.89% and -0.69%, respectively. In order to have a direct measure of the part of FAT that is not due to SAT, a new trait (dSAT) was post-evaluated and defined as difference between expected SAT EBV for a given FAT EBV and the estimated EBV for SAT. This new trait can be assumed to be a direct predictor of the content of unsaturated fatty acids in fat. The interest is that this trait cannot be accurately predicted directly by MIR. The maximum and minimum EBV for dSAT for the 1,707 bulls were -0.28% and 0.24%, respectively. Based on these results, a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids is feasible. In the bull population used recently, a genetic variability for dSAT exists and could be used to improve the milk fat composition. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLateral-torsional buckling of carbon steel and stainless steel beams subjected to combined end moments and transverse loads in case of fire
Lopes, Nuno; Vila Real, Paulo; Da Silva, Luis et al

in Kodur, Venkatesh; Franssen, Jean-Marc (Eds.) Structures in Fire. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference (2010)

This paper presents a numerical study on the behaviour of carbon steel and stainless steel I-beams subjected to lateral-torsional buckling (LTB) in case of fire. The main motivation for this work is the ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a numerical study on the behaviour of carbon steel and stainless steel I-beams subjected to lateral-torsional buckling (LTB) in case of fire. The main motivation for this work is the fact that part 1-2 of Eurocode 3 (EC3) does not take into consideration the beneficial effect, resulting from the reduction of the plastic zones connected with non-uniform bending diagrams along the beam. Although new formulae for the LTB, that approximate better the real behaviour of steel structural elements in case of fire, have been proposed in previous works, they still do not considered the combination of end moments and transverse loads, as it is stated in part 1-1 of EC3. Therefore, in this paper numerical simulations, of steel beams with combined end moments and transverse loads, are compared with the LTB design curves of EC3, and new correction factors that improve these curves are presented. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeota and methanogens in the epipelagic waters of Lake Kivu (Rwanda-Democratic Republic of the Congo)
Llirós, M.; Gich, F.; Plasencia, A. et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2010), 76(20), 6853-6863

Four stratified basins in Lake Kivu (Rwanda-Democratic Republic of theCongo) were sampled in March 2007 to investigate the abundance,distribution, and potential biogeochemical role of planktonic archaea ... [more ▼]

Four stratified basins in Lake Kivu (Rwanda-Democratic Republic of theCongo) were sampled in March 2007 to investigate the abundance,distribution, and potential biogeochemical role of planktonic archaea. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization with catalyzed-reported deposition microscopic counts (CARD-FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of signature genes for ammonia-oxidizingarchaea (16S rRNA for marine Crenarchaeota group 1.1a [MCG1] and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A [amoA]). Abundance of archaea ranged from 1 to 4.5% of total DAPI (4'6- diamidino-2-phenylindole) counts with maximal concentrations at theoxic-anoxic transition zone (∼50-m depth). Phylogenetic analysis of the archaeal planktonic community revealed a higher level of richnessof crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (21 of the 28 operational taxonomic units [OTUs] identified [75%]) over euryarchaeotal ones (7 OTUs). Sequences affiliated with the kingdom Euryarchaeota were mainly recovered from the anoxic water compartment and mostly grouped into methanogenic lineages (Methanosarcinales and Methanocellales). In turn, crenarchaeal phylotypes were recovered throughout the sampled epipelagic waters (0- to 100-m depth), with clear phylogenetic segregation along the transition from oxic to anoxic water masses. Thus, whereas in the anoxic hypolimnion crenarchaeotal OTUs were mainly assigned to the miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group, the OTUs from the oxic-anoxic transition and above belonged to Crenarchaeota groups 1.1a and 1.1b, two lineages containing most of the ammonia-oxidizing representatives known so far. The concomitant vertical distribution of both nitrite and nitrate maxima and the copy numbers of both MCG1 16S rRNA and amoA genes suggest the potential implication of Crenarchaeota in nitrification processes occurring in the epilimnetic waters of the lake. © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAnalyser les réseaux dans les cours de géographie
Merenne-Schoumaker, Bernadette ULg

in G.E.O. (2010), 67

Les réseaux se retrouvent un peu partout en géographie : réseaux hydrographiques, réseaux de transport, réseaux de firmes, réseaux d’informations, réseaux de villes, réseaux migratoires … D’où le choix de ... [more ▼]

Les réseaux se retrouvent un peu partout en géographie : réseaux hydrographiques, réseaux de transport, réseaux de firmes, réseaux d’informations, réseaux de villes, réseaux migratoires … D’où le choix de cette thématique dans de nombreux congrès comme celui des Sciences de cette année ou encore celui du Festival international de Géographie de Saint-Dié (FIG) en 2005. La plupart s’appuient sur la « géographie », c’est-à-dire sur les territoires dans leurs dimensions physiques et humaines ; parallèlement ils influencent de nombreux systèmes spatiaux étant en quelque sorte les « vaisseaux sanguins » de l’espace géographique. Cette contribution poursuit quatre objectifs : réfléchir au concept de réseau en géographie, présenter quelques types de réseaux et les notions/concepts associés, évoquer quelques pistes d’analyse de ces réseaux et tenter un bilan et des perspectives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 374 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFormation de coordinateurs de centres de vacances
Danse, Cédric ULg

Learning material (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'étalement urbain coûte cher. Où en est le débat ?
Halleux, Jean-Marie ULg

in ADEF (Ed.) Repenser le foncier - La ressource foncière au coeur du changement (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysis of the Gas Holdup Evolution in a Circulating Jet-Loop Nitrifying MBR
Kouakou, Edouard; Marchot, Pierre ULg; Crine, Michel ULg

in International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering (2010), 8(1),

This paper presents an analysis of the gas holdup evolution in a novel type of jet-loop membrane bioreactor (JLMBR), designed for nitrogen removal through the nitrite route application. Its configuration ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an analysis of the gas holdup evolution in a novel type of jet-loop membrane bioreactor (JLMBR), designed for nitrogen removal through the nitrite route application. Its configuration is inspired from airlift systems. It consists of a 60-l reactor made of an internal airlift system coupled to an external liquid recirculation loop. Hollow fiber membranes are submerged in the riser compartment. The process was intermittently fed with a synthetic ammonia solution and the gas holdup evolution was monitored for 500 to 600 days. Experiments were performed using flowrates ranging from 0.4 to 1.03 Nm3/h, and from 0 to 0.6 m3/h for air and water, respectively. This corresponded to superficial velocities from 0.004 to 0.03 m.s􀀀1 for air and 0 to 0.011 m.s􀀀1 for water. The gas holdup g was directly measured by the volume expansion method, using a tubular level meter located on the plant. The reported results showed that, in the absence of microorganisms, g ranged between 0.5 and 5.5% for the investigated range of gas liquid superficial velocities, whilst increasing from 0.5 to 4.8% only in the presence of gas (no liquid recirculation). This double influence of the air and the liquid velocities on the gas holdup was described by a multilinear correlation. However in the presence of biosolids in the reactor, the gas holdup raised up to 6.5%, corresponding to an increase of ca. 48% (in average, with respect to data recorded on day 0). This increase in g was attributed to both a gas entrainment effect and an impact of the bioparticles recirculated into the reactor. Under experimental conditions investigated, the gas holdup increased linearly with the air and the liquid velocities, what corresponded to the bubbly flow regime in the system. This showed that, according to investigated conditions, the impact of circulated biomass was not enough to change the bubble gas flow regime. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailActivités de recherche du laboratoire de Chimie Analytique
Ziemons, Eric ULg; Hubert, Philippe ULg

Scientific conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 171 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrom a bouncing compound drop to a double emulsion
Terwagne, Denis ULg; Gilet, Tristan ULg; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg et al

in Langmuir (2010), 26(14), 11680

We show that a double emulsion (oil in water in oil) can be created starting from a compound droplet (surfactant solution in oil). The compound drop bounces on a vertically vibrated liquid surface. When ... [more ▼]

We show that a double emulsion (oil in water in oil) can be created starting from a compound droplet (surfactant solution in oil). The compound drop bounces on a vertically vibrated liquid surface. When the amplitude of the vibration exceeds a threshold value, the oil layer penetrates the water content and leaves a tiny oil droplet within. As this phenomenon occurs at each vigorous impact, the compound drop progressively transforms into a double emulsion. The emulsification threshold, which is observed to depend on the forcing frequency but not on the drop size, is rationalized by investigating the impact of compound drops onto a static liquid surface. The droplet creation occurs when the kinetic energy released at impact is larger than the energy required to deform the compound drop, namely when the Weber number is higher than a given threshold value. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (33 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailParametrical study on the behaviour of steel and composite cellular beams under fire conditions
Vassart, Olivier; Bailey, C. G.; Bihina, Gisèle et al

in Kodur, Venkatesh; Franssen, Jean-Marc (Eds.) Structures in Fire. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference (2010)

This paper describes an extensive parametric study on the behaviour of cellular beam under fire conditions. Different finite element models using shell elements were developed considering both material ... [more ▼]

This paper describes an extensive parametric study on the behaviour of cellular beam under fire conditions. Different finite element models using shell elements were developed considering both material and geometrical non-linearity; CAST3M [1], ANSYS [2] and another one in SAFIR [3]. They were calibrated on the basis of a new experimental test campaign performed in the scope of the project FICEB+ [4] funded by the Research Fund for Coal and Steel. The comparison between the finite element prediction and actual experimental results showed a good agreement in terms of failure modes, load deflection relationship and ultimate loads. At failure, temperature measured during the fire tests indicated that failure arising by web post buckling of cellular beams in fire cannot be simply estimated by applying temperature dependent reduction factors on strength alone, as given in codes. A design model representing the behaviour of cellular beam in fire conditions has been developed by Vassart [5-7]. This design model is able to predict the complex behaviour of cellular beam in case of fire comprising web-post buckling and Vierendeel bending, as well as standard flexural bending. The results of the Finite Element Models are compared in terms of critical temperatures and failure mode obtained using the design model. This paper also contains some tests results that were used to calibrate the FEM model and the comparison between analytical and FEM models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImproved Aid Effectiveness but Waiting for Results: What are the Missing Links?
Paul, Elisabeth ULg; Dujardin, Bruno; Ireland, Megan et al

Conference (2010)

Objectives: The objective is to analyze the content of the Paris Declaration (PD) on aid effectiveness and Accra Agenda for Action (AAA), and their practical implications for the health sector in aid ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The objective is to analyze the content of the Paris Declaration (PD) on aid effectiveness and Accra Agenda for Action (AAA), and their practical implications for the health sector in aid-recipient countries. Design/methods: The study draws on (i) a critical analysis of the two declarations, (ii) a review of the literature on their implementation and (iii) interviews of people in charge of implementing them – both donors and government representatives. Results: The PD and AAA both have a "missing link" between, on the one hand, international cooperation policies (five pillars of the PD) and national development (health) plans; and, on the other hand, the operational level that is supposed to deliver results. They presume that by changing aid management and respecting a few principles, development results will automatically improve as through a "black box". The influence of international and national policies over health systems, service providers’ behaviour and health impacts is not treated at all by the agenda for aid effectiveness, while it is crucial for its success. Moreover, that agenda is mostly dealt with at a too high level (international forums or at best national sector level), thus deepening the disconnexion from field realities. Conclusions/policy implications: This "missing link" entails the risk that, if the "black box" does not perform as expected – that is, if health systems and health service providers’ behaviour do not evolve in a positive way – and health impacts do not improve, the aid effectiveness agenda may be rejected at all, notwithstanding its (incomplete) added value. Hence the need to closely monitor the processes of national health plans implementation, so in order to better understand how these processes are translated on the field and what could be done to ensure that health service delivery and health results ultimately improve. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPaul Jaspar à Paris. Le pavillon de la "Collectivité belge des fabricants d'armes" à l'Exposition de Paris 1900
Charlier, Sébastien ULg

in Bulletin de l'Institut Archéologique Liégeois (2010), CXIV

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpectroscopic studies and molecular modeling for understanding the interactions between cholesterol and cyclodextrins
Castagne, Delphine ULg; Dive, Georges ULg; Evrard, Brigitte ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences : A Publication of the Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences (2010), 13(2), 362-377

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'image du mois. Langue villeuse noire.
Szepetiuk, Grégory ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65(4), 169-70

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPoor glycaemic control in secondary care insulin treated patients correlates with bad process indicators
DEBACKER, N.; VAN CROMBRUGGE, P.; MATHIEU, C. et al

in Diabetologia (2010), 53(s407), 1018

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIconographies de saints mosans : Liège, Archives de l’Evêché St-Amand de Jupille
George, Philippe ULg

in Bulletin de la Société Royale Le Vieux-Liège (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailQuelques histoires du japonisme
Bawin, Julie ULg

in La Lettre des Académies (2010), 20

Detailed reference viewed: 154 (14 ULg)