Reference : Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Public health, health care sciences & services
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/99076
Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres
English
Demaret, Isabelle mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
Lemaître, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Institut des sciences humaines et sociales > Criminologie >]
ANSSEAU, Marc mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
2012
Journal of Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing
Blackwell Publishing
19
563-567
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1351-0126
1365-2850
[en] Addiction ; Mental health settings ; nursing role ; safety ; security
[en] Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) is a solution for improving the condition of treatmentresistant
heroin addicts. Since 1994, six randomized controlled trials have concluded
that HAT is more efficacious than oral methadone for severe heroin addicts.We visited
seven HAT treatment centres in four countries in order to observe diacetylmorphine
(DAM) administration and to study the main concerns of the staff. Nurses were
concerned by the risk taken if a previously intoxicated patient received his dose of DAM.
Another concern was the smuggling of DAM doses. The HAT centres face a dilemma:
treating patients while at the same time allowing their risky street habits in the centre.
Service public fédéral Santé publique, Sécurité de la Chaîne alimentaire et Environnement
Suivi et évaluation scientifique du projet TADAM (un traitement assisté par diacétylmorphine)
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/99076
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/162428
10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01810.x
Accessible summary
• For some heron addicts, heroin-assisted treatment is more efficacious than methadone
treatment.
• Seven European countries have implemented outpatient centres where patients
self-administer pharmaceutical heroin under close supervision.
• Nurses deliver pharmaceutical heroin and supervise administration. The two main
concerns are overdosing and smuggling.
• Nurses are convinced of the utility of this treatment for severe heroin addicts.

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