Reference : Patterns of physical activity determined by heart rate monitoring among diabetic children
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Pediatrics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/98123
Patterns of physical activity determined by heart rate monitoring among diabetic children
English
Massin, M. M. [> > > >]
Lebrethon, M. C. [> > > >]
Brumioul, Danielle [Université de Liège - ULg > > Département des sciences cliniques >]
Gérard, Paul [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de mathématique > Statistique (aspects expérimentaux) >]
Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Pédiatrie >]
Dec-2005
Archives of Disease in Childhood
B M J Publishing Group
90
12
1223-1226
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0003-9888
1468-2044
London
[en] Background: Children with type 1 diabetes should be encouraged to participate in physical activity because exercise can benefit insulin sensitivity and improve known risk factors for atherosclerosis. Methods: Physical activity patterns of 127 children and adolescents with stable type 1 diabetes were investigated by 24 hour continuous heart rate monitoring. The percentage of heart rate reserve was used to measure the amounts of physical activity at different intensities. The results were compared with normative data. Results: Diabetic preschoolchildren accumulated 192.7 (78.1), 39.1 (24.3), and 21.3 (9.4) minutes/day (mean (SD)) of light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, respectively. At the same activity levels, diabetic schoolchildren accumulated 168.9 (76.7), 37.9 (15.9), and 19.0 (14.8) minutes/day, and diabetic teenagers accumulated 166.3 (67.5), 45.6 (26.9), and 25.2 (15.3) minutes/day. Diabetic schoolchildren were significantly more active than healthy peers when considering moderate activity; diabetic teenagers were significantly more active when considering moderate and vigorous activity. There was a negative correlation between the most recent glycated haemoglobin and the time spent in light activities in schoolchildren, and a negative correlation between mean glycated haemoglobin for one year and time spent in light and moderate activities in schoolchildren. Conclusion: The majority of our diabetic patients meet the classical paediatric guidelines for physical activity and compare favourably with their healthy peers.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/98123
10.1136/adc.2005.075283

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