Reference : Disorders of consciousness: What's in a name?
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/98049
Disorders of consciousness: What's in a name?
English
Gosseries, Olivia mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Chatelle, Camille mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Schnakers, Caroline mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Soddu, Andrea mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
LAUREYS, Steven mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie Sart Tilman >]
2011
NeuroRehabilitation
IOS Press
28
3-14
Yes (verified by ORBi)
1053-8135
Amsterdam
The Netherlands
[en] Consciousness ; functional MRI ; positron emission tomography ; vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome ; minimally conscious state
[en] Following a coma, some patients may “awaken” without voluntary interaction or communication with the environment. More than 40 years ago this condition was coined coma vigil or apallic syndrome and later became worldwide known as “persistent vegetative state”. About 10 years ago it became clear that some of these patients who failed to recover verbal or nonverbal communication did show some degree of consciousness – a condition called “minimally conscious state”. Some authors questioned the usefulness of differentiating unresponsive “vegetative” from minimally conscious patients but subsequent functional neuroimaging studies have since objectively demonstrated differences in residual cerebral processing and hence, we think, conscious awareness. These neuroimaging studies have also demonstrated that a small subset of unresponsive “vegetative” patients may show unambiguous signs of consciousness and command following inaccessible to bedside clinical examination. These findings, together with negative associations intrinsic to the term “vegetative state” as well as the diagnostic errors and
their potential effect on the treatment and care for these patients gave rise to the recent proposal for an alternative neutral and more descriptive name: unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. We here give an overview of PET and (functional) MRI studies performed in these challenging patients and stress the need for a separate ICD9CM diagnosis code and MEDLINEMeSH entry for “minimally conscious state” as the lack of clear distinction between vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and minimally conscious state may encumber scientific studies in the field of disorders of consciousness.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/98049

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