Reference : Effects of long term soil organic matter restitution mode on soil heterotrophic respi...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Agriculture & agronomy
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/96912
Effects of long term soil organic matter restitution mode on soil heterotrophic respiration and soil biological properties.
English
[fr] Effets à long terme du mode de restitution de la matière organique sur la respiration hétérotrophe et les propriétés biologiques du sol.
Buysse, Pauline mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences et technologie de l'environnement > Physique des bio-systèmes >]
Carnol, Monique mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Malchair, Sandrine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Roisin, Christian mailto [Centre de Recherches Agronomiques (CRA) de Gembloux > > > >]
Aubinet, Marc mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences et technologie de l'environnement > Physique des bio-systèmes >]
Jul-2011
Yes
No
International
Soil Organic Matter (SOM) meeting 2011
du 11 au 14 juillet 2011
KU Leuven
Leuven
Belgique
[en] Soil heterotrophic respiration ; crop management ; Organic matter restitution ; Long term ; soil temperature ; soil moisture content
[en] Soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR) is the process by which CO2 is released during organic matter decomposition. It is generally expected that SHR can act as a positive feedback to global warming, therefore leading to more CO2 release into the atmosphere. It is thus important to better understand this process. Particularly, agricultural soils may behave as important CO2 sources that are strongly influenced by soil and crop management (e.g. organic matter restitution modes, hereafter “OM-RM”). The present study aimed at determining if, after more than 50 years of application of different OM-RM, (1) significant differences of SHR fluxes can be observed between treatments, (2) SHR responses to temperature and soil moisture content can be affected by the OM-RM and (3) the experimental design is suitable to assess potential differences between treatments.
The experimental field is situated in Liroux, near Gembloux in Belgium. At that site, a long term experiment with different OM-RM runs from 1959 onwards. For the present study, three contrasted treatments were considered: (1) exportation of all residues after harvest, (2) addition of manure once every three to four years and (3) restitution of residues after harvest. SHR flux measurements were carried out manually on fourteen occasions from 2 April to 30 July 2010, using a dynamic closed chamber system. Temperature and soil moisture content at 5 cm depth were also measured manually.
Results showed that after more than 50 years of OM-RM application, no significant differences could be observed between the three treatments in terms of SHR fluxes and SHR responses to temperature or soil moisture, while the soil organic carbon content did vary significantly between them. The sensitivity to temperature was quite low in all treatments, with a mean Q10 value of 1,36. Besides, SHR fluxes were seen to be more responsive to increases in soil water content than to absolute soil moisture content values. Indeed, when soil moisture content increased between two consecutive measurement dates, the ratio of the corresponding SHR fluxes was larger than 1. Particularly dry conditions in 2010 may actually have caused the fluxes to be very low, making the assessment of differences between treatments more difficult. Moreover, soil dryness is likely to be responsible for the SHR flux increases after rain events, as caused by re-solubilization of organic compounds. Also, an important spatial variability was observed, which may have obscured the assessment of potential differences between treatments.
Further investigations will consist in performing a new flux measurement campaign in 2011 that will take the spatial variability issue into account, and in monitoring microbial and soil properties in the different treatments, such as microbial biomass, metabolic activity and labile carbon.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/96912

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