Reference : The use of pre-operative intrathecal morphine for analgesia following coronary artery...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
Human health sciences : Surgery
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/9568
The use of pre-operative intrathecal morphine for analgesia following coronary artery bypass surgery
English
Roediger, Laurence mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Joris, Jean mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Senard, Marc mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Larbuisson, Robert mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Canivet, Jean-Luc mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Soins intensifs >]
Lamy, Maurice mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Anesthésie et réanimation]
Sep-2006
Anaesthesia
Blackwell Science
61
9
838-844
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0003-2409
1365-2044
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] With the emergence of rapid extubation protocols following cardiac surgery, providing adequate analgesia in the early postoperative period is important. This prospective randomised double-blind study investigated the benefits of pre-operative intrathecal administration of low dose morphine in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Postoperative analgesia, pulmonary function, stress response and postoperative recovery profile were assessed. Thirty patients were allocated into two groups, receiving either 500 mug of morphine intrathecally prior to anaesthesia and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with morphine postoperatively following tracheal extubation, or only postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. In the intrathecal group, the total consumption of intravenous morphine following surgery was significantly reduced by 40% and patients reported lower pain scores at rest, during the first 24 h following extubation. Peak expiratory flow rate was greater and postoperative catecholamine release was significantly lower. Patients in the control group had a higher incidence of reduced respiratory rate following extubation.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/9568
10.1111/j.1365-2044.2006.04744.x

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