Reference : Carrion beetles visiting pig carcasses during early spring in urban, forest and agricult...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/95570
Carrion beetles visiting pig carcasses during early spring in urban, forest and agricultural biotopes of Western Europe
English
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Brostaux, Yves mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
29-Jun-2011
Journal of Insect Science [=JIS]
University of Wisconsin Library
11
1-13
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1536-2442
WI
[en] Silphidae ; carrion ecology ; decomposition ; forensic entomology ; insect succession
[en] Carrion beetles are important in terrestrial ecosystems, consuming dead mammals and promoting the recycling of organic matter into ecosystems. Most forensic studies are focused on succession of Diptera while neglecting Coleoptera. So far, little information is available on carrion beetles postmortem colonization and decomposition process in temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles are however part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need databases concerning the distribution, ecology and phenology of necrophagous insects, including silphids. Forensic entomology uses pig carcasses to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate entomofaunal succession. However, few studies have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. The work reported here monitored the presence of the carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) on decaying pig carcasses in three selected biotopes (forest, crop field, urban site) at the beginning of spring. Seven species of Silphidae were recorded: Nicrophorus humator (Gleditsch), Nicrophorus vespillo (L.), Nicrophorus vespilloides (Herbst), Necrodes littoralis L., Oiceoptoma thoracica L., Thanatophilus sinuatus (Fabricius), Thanatophilus rugosus (L.). All of these species were caught in the forest biotope, and all but O. thoracica were caught in the agricultural biotope. No silphids were caught in the urban site
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/95570

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