Reference : Brain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: p...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Radiology, nuclear medicine & imaging
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/88582
Brain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: prominent role of blue light and the brainstem
English
Vandewalle, Gilles mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Schmidt, Christina mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Albouy, Geneviève [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Sterpenich, Virginie [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Darsaud, Annabelle [> > > >]
Rauchs, Géraldine [> > > >]
Berken, Pierre-Yves [> > > >]
Balteau, Evelyne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron - Département de physique >]
Degueldre, Christian mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Luxen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie organique de synthèse - Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie Sart Tilman >]
Dijk, Derk-Jan [> > > >]
2007
PLoS ONE
Public Library of Science
2
11
e1247
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1932-6203
San Franscisco
CA
[en] Adult ; Analysis of Variance ; Behavior ; Brain Stem/*physiology ; *Color ; Female ; Humans ; *Light ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Positron-Emission Tomography
[en] BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s) monochromatic violet (430 nm), blue (473 nm), and green (527 nm) light exposures of equal photon flux (10(13)ph/cm(2)/s) while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/88582
10.1371/journal.pone.0001247
2007/11/29

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