Reference : Self-face does not capture attention: an inattentional blindness study
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/85172
Self-face does not capture attention: an inattentional blindness study
English
Devue, Christel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie cognitive >]
Laloyaux, Cédric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
Feyers, Dorothée mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Brédart, Serge mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie cognitive >]
2006
Yes
Annual Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences
Liège
Belgium
[en] self face recognition ; face perception ; selective attention ; inatentionnal blindness ; face detection
[en] It has been shown previously that some categories of stimuli are more likely to capture attention under condition of inattention compared to others. This is the case of faces and auto-referential material (e.g., the subject’s own name) in the inattentional blindness paradigm (Mack & Rock, 1998). However, stimuli combining these two properties have never been assessed. Yet it could be that the own face, because it is both a face and a self-referential stimulus, is more prone to attract attention compared to other faces. On the contrary, it could be that the identity and the familiarity of faces are not relevant factors because any face attracts attention by itself and all faces are equally distractive. Moreover, most of previous studies have used schematic unrealistic stimuli. Here, we tested these two opposite hypotheses in a first experiment using photographic stimuli and results showed that the own face does not attract attention compared to another highly familiar face or to an unknown face. Nevertheless, it appears that the own face was still better recognized compared to the others. A second experiment was aimed at verifying whether faces attract attention more than other objects with the same realistic photographic stimuli than used in experiment 1. Results confirmed previous findings that faces are more resistant to inattentional blindness than other objects. Our study suggests that a face by itself attracts attention compared to other objects whatever its familiarity or its identity. These results challenge the view that auto-referential material benefits from specific attentional processes.
Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective d'Initiative des Chercheurs - FRFC
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/85172

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