Reference : The production and localization of laminin in cultured vascular and corneal endothelial ...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Biochemistry, biophysics & molecular biology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/84494
The production and localization of laminin in cultured vascular and corneal endothelial cells.
English
Gospodarowicz, D. [ > > ]
Greenburg, G. [ > > ]
Foidart, Jean-Michel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Gynécologie - Obstétrique - Labo de biologie des tumeurs et du développement >]
Savion, N. [ > > ]
1981
Journal of Cellular Physiology
Wiley Liss, Inc.
107
2
171-83
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0021-9541
1097-4652
New York
NY
[en] The production and localization of laminin, as a function of cell density (sparse versus confluent cultures) and growth stage (actively growing versus resting cultures), has been compared on the cell surfaces of cultured vascular and corneal endothelial cells. Comparison of the abilities of the two types of cells to secrete laminin and fibronectin into their incubation medium reveals that vascular endothelial cells can secrete 20-fold as much laminin as can corneal endothelial cells. In contrast, both cell types produce comparable amounts of fibronectin. Furthermore, if one compares the secretion of laminin and fibronectin as a function of cell growth, it appears that the laminin released into the medium by either vascular or corneal endothelial cells, is a function of cell density and cell growth, since this release is most pronounced when the cells are sparse and actively growing, and decreases by 10- and 30-fold, respectively, when either vascular or corneal endothelial cell cultures become confluent. With regard to fibronectin secretion, no such variation can be seen with vascular endothelial cell cultures, regardless of whether they are sparse and actively growing or confluent and resting. Corneal endothelial cell cultures, demonstrated a twofold increase in fibronectin production when they were confluent and resting as compared to when they were sparse and actively growing. When the distribution of laminin versus fibronectin within the apical and basal cell surfaces of cultured corneal and vascular endothelial cells is compared, one can observe that unlike fibronectin, which in sparse and subconfluent cultures can be seen to be associated with both the apical and basal cell surfaces, laminin does not ever seem to be present on the apical cell surface. In confluent cultures, laminin can be found associated primarily with the extracellular matrix beneath the cell monolayer, where it codistributes with type IV collagen.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/84494

There is no file associated with this reference.

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.