Reference : Geography and host biogeography matter for understanding the phylogeography of a parasite.
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/80209
Geography and host biogeography matter for understanding the phylogeography of a parasite.
English
Nieberding, Caroline M. [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Zoogéographie >]
Durette-Desset, Marie-Claude [National Museum of Natural History (Paris) >]
Vanderpoorten, Alain mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Taxonomie végétale et biologie de la conservation >]
Casanova, J. C. [> > > >]
Ribas, A. [> > > >]
Deffontaine, V. [> > > >]
Feliu, C. [> > > >]
Morand, S. [> > > >]
Libois, Roland mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Zoogéographie - Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement >]
Michaux, Johan mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Génétique >]
2008
Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution
Academic Press
47
2
538-54
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1055-7903
1095-9513
San Diego
CA
[en] Animals ; Base Sequence ; Consensus Sequence ; Cytochromes b/genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Geography ; Heligmosomatoidea/genetics ; Murinae/parasitology ; Parasites/genetics ; Phylogeny ; Time Factors
[en] The co-evolution between hosts and parasites has long been recognized as a fundamental driver of macro-evolutionary patterns of diversification. The effect of co-differentiation on parasite diversification is, however, often confounded by underlying geographic patterns of host distribution. In order to disentangle the confounding effects of allopatric versus host speciation, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene was sequenced in seventy individuals of the parasitic nematode genus Heligmosomoides sampled in the six Apodemus mice species common in the western Palearctic region. The nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 were also sequenced in fifteen parasites to confirm the mitochondrial data. All lineages differentiated according to a geographic pattern and independently from the sampled host species. This suggests that host speciation did not involve concurrent parasite speciation. However, the geographic distribution range of some parasite lineages mirrors that of A. sylvaticus lineages in SW Europe, and that of A. flavicollis lineages in the Balkans and in the Middle East. Thus, regional co-differentiation likely occurred between the parasite and the two sister Apodemus hosts in different parts of their distribution range. We suggest that differences in regional abundances of A. sylvaticus and A. flavicollis are responsible for generating this pattern of regional co-differentiation. This study highlights the importance of integrating both geography and biogeographic information from potential hosts to better understand their parasite phylogeography.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/80209
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/80278 ; http://hdl.handle.net/2268/9909
10.1016/j.ympev.2008.01.028

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
biogeography parasite MPE.pdfPublisher postprint1.03 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.