Reference : Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of recent clinical isolates of group B streptococci ag...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a book
Human health sciences : Immunology & infectious disease
Human health sciences : Laboratory medicine & medical technology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/78947
Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of recent clinical isolates of group B streptococci agalactiae from Belgium
English
MELIN, Pierrette mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Microbiologie médicale >]
Maquet, Julie [ > > ]
Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel [Universitad de la Republica, Montevideo, Uruguay > > > >]
HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Microbiologie médicale >]
CHRISTIAENS, Geneviève mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Direction médicale >]
De Mol, Patrick mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Microbiologie médicale et virologie médicale >]
Sep-2003
Program and Abstracts of the 43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
American Society of Microbiology
American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
Abstract du poster C2-81
Yes
No
International
w
USA
43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)
Du 13 au 17 septembre 2003
American Society of Microbiology
Chicago
USA
[en] Group B streptococci ; Antimicrobial susceptibility ; clinical isolates ; Belgium
[en] Background: : GBS cause severe infections in neonates, pregnant women and other adults. Empiric therapy is usually started before susceptibility results are available. Early neonatal diseases can be prevented with intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis based on accurate susceptibility surveillance data. A previous Belgian study showed an increase of 3 to 10 % R to erythromycin (EM) through the 1990s.
Methods: 187 GBS isolates consecutively received at the reference laboratory between 2001 to March 2003 were from 73 neonates (52 early-onset and 21 late-onset diseases), 52 adults and 62 from pregnant women’s vagina. MICs of penicillin (PG), EM, clindamycin (CM) and gentamicin (GM) were determined with Etest. PG MBCs were also determined by inactivating the drug in MIC plates using betalactamase. EM resistant (R) isolates were tested by the CM + EM double disk to determine macrolide R phenotypes.
Results: All strains were susceptible (S) to PG and no tolerance was observed with MBCs falling within 2 dilutions of MICs. 19.2% of isolates were R to EM, with significantly more R isolates from adults (30.8%; p
<0.01) and serotype V (46.8%; p <0,001). 80% had the MLSB phenotype (R to EM and CM), 16 were constitutive and 12 inducible. The M phenotype (R to EM and S to CM) was seen in 7 (20%) of isolates. Less than 10% of isolates were inhibited by GM MIC of <=64 mg/L, 83.6% by 128-256 mg/L and 2.9% by >/=512 mg/L. Non typable strains were more R to GM (p <0.01).
Conclusions: 1) PG remained active against all isolates and no tolerance was seen. 2) Prevalence of R to macrolides had increased since 1999, particularly in adult isolates and serotype V. 3) Intermediate to high level R to GM was seen and potential synergy of PG + GM should be investigated. 4) R surveillance is mandatory to guide prophylaxis and treatment of serious GBS infections.
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http://hdl.handle.net/2268/78947

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