Reference : Immune depression of the SJL/J mouse, a radioresistant and immunologically atypical inbr...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/77879
Immune depression of the SJL/J mouse, a radioresistant and immunologically atypical inbred strain.
English
Glineur, Stéphanie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de morphologie et pathologie > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de productions animales > Biostatistique, économie, sélection animale >]
Michaux, Charles mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de productions animales > Biostatistique, économie, sélection animale >]
Desmecht, Daniel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de morphologie et pathologie > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
2011
Immunobiology
Gustav Fischer Verlag
216
1-2
213-217
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0171-2985
Stuttgart
Germany
[en] sjl/j ; irradiation ; radioresistant
[en] As the inbred mouse strain SJL/J displays increased resistance to several pathogens and as its immune system shows multiple specificities, it is tempting to infer a causal link between these observations. The first question that comes to mind is whether adaptive immunity plays a role, and a way to answer this question is to see if the resistance phenotype persists when adaptive immunity is depressed. Although it has long been known that irradiation causes repression of leukopoiesis in mice, the technical data available in the literature are of no help in the case of strain SJL/J, because it displays exceptional radioresistance. Here we show that exposure of SJL/J to ∼9Gy, an intensity corresponding to the lethal dose 50 for the species Mus musculus, leads to serious but reversible alteration of leukopoiesis. This conclusion stems from an examination of the effects, 1-11 days post-exposure, of whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on leukocyte populations in the thymus and peripheral blood of young adult females. Immunodepression was most severe 4 days post-exposure. As in other strains, leukocyte populations displayed differential radiosensitivity, B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD4(+)/CD8(+)) cells moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells most resistant. Surprisingly, however, the helper/inducer T lymphocytes proved more resistant than the cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes, contrarily to what is observed in other strains. The procedure described will make it possible to refute or establish reliably the existence of causal links between SJL-specific phenotypic traits and immune aberrations and to elucidate further the respective roles of innate and acquired immunity in determining the resistance of this strain to an array of viral diseases.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/77879
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/108710 ; http://hdl.handle.net/2268/61869
10.1016/J.IMBIO.2010.04.005

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