Reference : Forest refugia revisited: nSSRs and cpDNA sequences support historical isolation in a wi...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Genetics & genetic processes
Life sciences : Agriculture & agronomy
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/73297
Forest refugia revisited: nSSRs and cpDNA sequences support historical isolation in a wide-spread African tree with high colonization capacity, Milicia excelsa (Moraceae)
English
Daïnou, Kasso mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Bizoux, Jean-Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Doucet, Jean-Louis mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Mahy, Grégory mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Hardy, Olivier J. mailto [> >]
Heuertz, Myriam mailto [> >]
2010
Molecular Ecology
Blackwell Publishing
19
4462-4477
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0962-1083
1365-294X
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] forest refugia ; Milicia excelsa ; nDNA ; cpDNA ; spatial genetic structure ; tropical Africa ; Approximate Bayesian Computation
[en] The impact of the Pleistocene climate oscillations on the structure of biodiversity in tropical regions remains poorly understood. In this study, the forest refuge theory is examined at the molecular level in Milicia excelsa, a dioecious tree with a continuous range throughout tropical Africa. Eight nuclear microsatellites (nuSSRs) and two sequences and one microsatellite from chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) showed a deep divide between samples from Benin and those from Lower Guinea. This suggests both that these populations were isolated in separate geographical regions, probably for several glacial cycles of the Pleistocene, and a poor mixture of gene pools despite M. excelsa’s wind-pollination syndrome. The divide can also be related to seed dispersal patterns, which should be largely determined by the migration behaviour of M. excelsa's main seed disperser, the frugivorous bat Eidolon helvum. Within Lower Guinea, a north-south divide, observed with both markers despite weak genetic structure (nuSSRs: FST=0.035, cpDNA: GST=0.506), suggested the existence of separate Pleistocene refugia in Cameroon and the Gabon/Congo region. We inferred a pollen-to-seed dispersal distance ratio of 1.76, consistent with wide-ranging gene dispersal by both wind and bats. Simulations in an Approximate Bayesian Computation framework suggested low nuSSR and cpDNA mutation rates but imprecise estimates of other demographic parameters, probably due to a substantial gene flow between the Lower Guinean gene pools. The decline of genetic diversity detected in some Gabonese populations could be a consequence of the relatively recent establishment of a closed canopy forest which may negatively affect M. excelsa's reproductive system.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/73297
10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04831.x

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