Reference : An investigation of verbal short-term memory and phonological processing in four childre...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/6943
An investigation of verbal short-term memory and phonological processing in four children with Williams syndrome
English
Majerus, Steve mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Barisnikov, K. [> > > >]
Vuillemin, I. [> > > >]
Poncelet, Martine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuropsychologie du langage et des apprentissages >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Oct-2003
Neurocase : Case Studies in Neuropsychology, Neuropsychiatry & Behavioural Neurology
Swets Zeitlinger Publishers
9
5
390-401
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1355-4794
Lisse
[fr] mémoire a court terme ; syndrome de Williams
[en] Although phonological processing is generally considered to be a proficiency in Williams syndrome (WS), there are very few studies which have extensively explored phonological processing abilities in WS. In this study, we re-assessed phonological processing in WS by exploring verbal STM and phonological awareness abilities in 4 children with WS (CA: 10-12 years) and two control groups, one matched for chronological age (CA) and the other matched for verbal mental age (VA). Our results confirm and extend previous claims of preserved phonological STM in WS by showing specifically preserved STM performance for non-words, compared to both VA and CA control groups. However, we observed that this was the case only for non-words where support of phonological and lexico-semantic knowledge was minimized, with reduced phonological and lexico-semantic effects on STM performance. Furthermore, a more direct assessment of phonological processing abilities through phonological awareness tasks showed impaired performance for the 4 WS children. Our data confirm that STM for non-words represents a real strength in. WS but they do not support previous assumptions of a more general preservation of phonological processing abilities in WS. Implications for impaired and preserved cognitive processes underlying verbal STM and phonological awareness abilities in WS are discussed.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/6943

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