Reference : Involvement of odorant cues in the process of superparasitism avoidance
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/68468
Involvement of odorant cues in the process of superparasitism avoidance
English
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Vandermoten, Sophie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Frere, Isabelle [ > > ]
Genin, Véronique [ > > ]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services administratifs généraux > Vice-Recteur de Gembloux Agro Bio Tech - Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Hance, Thierry [ > > ]
Aug-2010
Yes
No
International
26th International Sociey of Chemical Ecology Annual Meeting
du 31 juillet au 4 août 2010
International Sociey of Chemical Ecology
Tours
France
[en] Chemical Ecology ; Aphids ; pheromone ; natural enemies ; Parasitoids ; electronic nose ; semiochemicals
[en] The ability to avoid superparasitism provides a selective advantage to parasitoid females, allowing them to avoid depositing eggs in lower quality host. We observed in a Y-olfactometer that generalist aphid parasitoids, Aphidius ervi and Aphidius rhopalosiphi (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), were more attracted toward non-parasitized than parasitized Sitobion avenae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) colonies. We collected the odors released from healthy aphids and aphids parasitized for 2 and 6 days using an electronic nose. Sitobion avenae alarm pheromone, (E)-ß-farnesene (EßF), was the only chemical identified, and was found in lower quantities in parasitized aphids. Both parasitoid species provided pronounced electrical depolarizations to EßF in electroantennography (EAG), and both were attracted to the latter compound in the Y-olfactometer. Parasitoid attraction was known to be guided by a variety of odorant cues released by plants and hosts, and our results support the hypothesis that the aphid alarm pheromone acts as a kairomone for A. ervi and A. rhopalosiphi.
Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective d'Initiative des Chercheurs - FRFC
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/68468

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