Reference : The surprising diversity of clostridial hydrogenases: a comparative genomic perspective
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Microbiology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/66903
The surprising diversity of clostridial hydrogenases: a comparative genomic perspective
English
[fr] La diversité surprenante des hydrogénases de clostridies: une comparaison génomique
Calusinska, Magdalena mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre d'ingénierie des protéines >]
Happe, Thomas [> >]
Joris, Bernard mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Physiologie et génétique bactériennes - Centre d'ingénierie des protéines >]
Wilmotte, Annick mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Physiologie et génétique bactériennes >]
2010
Microbiology
Society for General Microbiology
156
1575-1588
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1350-0872
1465-2080
Reading
United Kingdom
[en] hydrogenases ; Clostridium ; genomes
[en] Among the large variety of micro-organisms capable of fermentative hydrogen production, strict anaerobes such as members of the genus Clostridium are the most widely studied. They can produce hydrogen by a reversible reduction of protons accumulated during fermentation to dihydrogen, a reaction which is catalysed by hydrogenases. Sequenced genomes provide completely new insights into the diversity of clostridial hydrogenases. Building on previous reports, we found that [FeFe] hydrogenases are not a homogeneous group of enzymes, but exist in multiple forms with different modular structures and are especially abundant in members of the genus Clostridium. This unusual diversity seems to support the central role of hydrogenases in cell metabolism. In particular, the presence of multiple putative operons encoding multisubunit [FeFe] hydrogenases highlights the fact that hydrogen metabolism is very complex in this genus. In contrast with [FeFe] hydrogenases, their [NiFe] hydrogenase counterparts, widely represented in other bacteria and archaea, are found in only a few clostridial species. Surprisingly, a heteromultimeric Ech hydrogenase, known to be an energy-converting [NiFe] hydrogenase and previously described only in methanogenic archaea and some sulfur-reducing bacteria, was found to be encoded by the genomes of four cellulolytic strains: Clostridum cellulolyticum, Clostridum papyrosolvens, Clostridum thermocellum and Clostridum phytofermentans
Centre d'Ingénierie des Protéines - CIP
Communauté française de Belgique - CfB, projet ARC
ARC project Micro-H2
Microbiological production of hydrogen: study of microalgal and bacterial processes
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/66903
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/63838
10.1099/mic.0.032771-0
http://mic.sgmjournals.org/cgi/reprint/156/6/1575

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