Reference : Further evidence on the relationship between dopamine and novelty seeking: a neuroendocr...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Social, industrial & organizational psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3494
Further evidence on the relationship between dopamine and novelty seeking: a neuroendocrine study
English
Hansenne, Michel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psycho. de la personnalité et des différences individuelles >]
Pinto, Emmanuel mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
Pitchot, William mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
Reggers, Jean [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > HOSPITALISATION - PSYCHO & PSYCHIATRIE T3 -3E - Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Département des sciences cliniques >]
Moor, Marie [> > > >]
Ansseau, Marc mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Psychiatrie et psychologie médicale >]
2002
Personality & Individual Differences
Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science
33
6
967-977
Yes (verified by ORBi)
0191-8869
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] reward dependence ; TCI ; apomorphine ; clonidine ; novelty seeking
[en] In the biosocial model of Cloninger, three major personality dimensions, novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD) are dependent on central monoaminergic systems, respectively dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic. This study investigated the relationships between these major personality dimensions and growth hormone (GH) responses to both apomorphine and clonidine challenge tests in healthy subjects. GH responses to apomorphine were significantly correlated with NS when peak relative values were considered (r=0.47, P=0.03). HA and RD did not show any relationships with the endocrine responses. In contrast, no significant relationship existed between GH responses to clonidine and any of the three temperament dimensions. These results gave another support of the hypothesized link between NS and dopaminergic central neurotransmission. In contrast, the results did not confirm the association between RD and noradrenergic central neurotransmission, probably because RD is poorly validated. This partial confirmation might suggest that the link between personality traits and neurotransmission systems is probably indirect. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Centre de Neurosciences Comportementale et Cognitive
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3494
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/6003

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