Reference : Thiamine triphosphate, a new signal required for optimal growth of Escherichia coli duri...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Biochemistry, biophysics & molecular biology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/519
Thiamine triphosphate, a new signal required for optimal growth of Escherichia coli during amino acid starvation
English
Lakaye, Bernard mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Biochimie et physiologie humaine et pathologique >]
Wirtzfeld, Barbara [> > > >]
Wins, Pierre [> > > >]
Grisar, Thierry mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Biochimie et physiologie humaine et pathologique]
Bettendorff, Lucien mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Biochimie et physiologie humaine et pathologique >]
2004
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Amer Soc Biochemistry Molecular Biology Inc
279
17
17142-17147
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0021-9258
Bethesda
[en] Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is present in low amounts in most organisms from bacteria to humans, but its biological role remains unknown. Escherichia coli grown aerobically in LB medium contain no detectable amounts of ThTP, but when they are transferred to M9 minimal medium with a substrate such as glucose or pyruvate, there is a rapid but transient accumulation of relatively high amounts of ThTP (about 20% of total thiamine). If a mixture of amino acids is present in addition to glucose, ThTP accumulation is impaired, suggesting that the latter may occur in response to amino acid starvation. To test the importance of ThTP for bacterial growth, we used an E. coli strain overexpressing a specific human recombinant thiamine triphosphatase as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-ThTPase). Those bacteria were unable to accumulate measurable amounts of ThTP. On minimal medium supplemented with glucose, pyruvate, or acetate, they exhibited an intermediate plateau in cell growth compared with control bacteria expressing GST alone or a GST fusion protein unrelated to thiamine metabolism. These results suggest that the early accumulation of ThTP initiates a reaction cascade involved in the adaptation of bacteria to stringent conditions such as amino acid starvation. This is the first demonstration of a physiological role of this ubiquitous compound in any organism.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/519
10.1074/jbc.M313569200

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