Reference : Self-reflection across time: cortical midline structures differentiate between present a...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/5186
Self-reflection across time: cortical midline structures differentiate between present and past selves
English
D'Argembeau, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Feyers, Dorothée mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Majerus, Steve mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuropsychologie - Département des sciences cognitives >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie Sart Tilman >]
Salmon, Eric [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie Sart Tilman >]
2008
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Oxford University Press
3
3
244-252
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1749-5016
1749-5024
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] fMRI ; medial prefrontal cortex ; time ; self
[en] The processing of personal changes across time and the ability to differentiate between representations of present and past selves are crucial for developing a mature sense of identity. In this study, we explored the neural correlates of self-reflection across time using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). College undergraduates were asked to reflect on their own psychological characteristics and those of an intimate other, for both the present time period (i.e. at college) and a past time period (i.e. high school years) that involved significant personal changes. Cortical midline structures (CMS) were commonly recruited by the four reflective tasks (reflecting on the present self, past self, present other and past other), relative to a control condition (making valence judgments). More importantly, however, the degree of activity in CMS also varied significantly according to the target of reflection, with the ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex being more recruited when reflecting on the present self than when reflecting on the past self or when reflecting on the other person. These findings suggest that CMS may contribute to differentiate between representations of present and past selves.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/5186
10.1093/scan/nsn020
The original publication is available at www.oxfordjournals.org

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