Reference : Morphological differences between Saturn's ultraviolet aurorae and those of Earth and...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/4538
Morphological differences between Saturn's ultraviolet aurorae and those of Earth and Jupiter
English
Clarke, J. T. [> > > >]
Gérard, Jean-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys.]
Grodent, Denis mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Wannawichian, S. [> > > >]
Gustin, Jacques mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Connerney, J. [> > > >]
Crary, F. [> > > >]
Dougherty, M. [> > > >]
Kurth, William [University of Iowa > Department of Physics and Astronomy >]
Cowley, S. W. H. [> > > >]
Bunce, E. J. [> > > >]
Hill, T. [> > > >]
Kim, J. [> > > >]
17-Feb-2005
Nature
Nature Publishing Group
433
7027
717-719
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0028-0836
London
[en] It has often been stated that Saturn's magnetosphere and aurorae are intermediate between those of Earth, where the dominant processes are solar wind driven(1), and those of Jupiter, where processes are driven by a large source of internal plasma(2-4). But this view is based on information about Saturn that is far inferior to what is now available. Here we report ultraviolet images of Saturn, which, when combined with simultaneous Cassini measurements of the solar wind(5) and Saturn kilometric radio emission(6), demonstrate that its aurorae differ morphologically from those of both Earth and Jupiter. Saturn's auroral emissions vary slowly; some features appear in partial corotation whereas others are fixed to the solar wind direction; the auroral oval shifts quickly in latitude; and the aurora is often not centred on the magnetic pole nor closed on itself. In response to a large increase in solar wind dynamic pressure(5) Saturn's aurora brightened dramatically, the brightest auroral emissions moved to higher latitudes, and the dawn side polar regions were filled with intense emissions. The brightening is reminiscent of terrestrial aurorae, but the other two variations are not. Rather than being intermediate between the Earth and Jupiter, Saturn's auroral emissions behave fundamentally differently from those at the other planets.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/4538

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