Reference : Polyomavirus in Renal Transplantation: A Hot Problem
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Immunology & infectious disease
Human health sciences : Urology & nephrology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/4352
Polyomavirus in Renal Transplantation: A Hot Problem
English
Bonvoisin, Catherine mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Néphrologie >]
Weekers, Laurent mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Néphrologie >]
Xhignesse, Patricia mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Néphrologie >]
Grosch, Stéphanie mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Néphrologie >]
Milicevic, Miroslav [Université de Liège - ULg > Faculté de Médecine > > >]
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Néphrologie >]
15-Apr-2008
Transplantation
85
7S
S42-S48
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0041-1337
[en] Renal transplantation ; BK virus nephropathy ; Decoy cell ; Leflunomide ; Cidofovir
[en] Polyomavirus BK has emerged as an important complication after kidney transplantation. Although, BK nephropathy
develops in only1%to5%of renal transplant recipients, its prognosis when present is very poor. The most accepted risk
factor is the level of immunosuppressive treatment, but the serostatus of donor and recipient and the absence of human
leukocyte antigen C7 in donor and/or recipient influence the BK virus (BKV) reactivation. The gold standard in
diagnosing BKV nephropathy (BKVN) continues to be biopsy with use of immunohistochemistry for large T antigens.
Urinary decoy cells and blood BKV DNA polymerase chain reaction are used in the screening, but their positive
predictive values are poor. However, their use as predictors of the evolution of BKVN is more valuable. The reduction
of immunosuppressive therapy currently represents the first-line treatment for BKVN. Cidofovir and leflunomide can
be used when BKVN continues to progress. In the event of graft loss, retransplantation is possible with a low risk of
recurrence when the infection is no longer active.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public ; Others
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/4352
10.1097/TP.0b013e318169c794

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