Reference : Serotype Distribution of clinical isolates of group B streptococci Isolated in Belgi...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a book
Human health sciences : Laboratory medicine & medical technology
Human health sciences : Immunology & infectious disease
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/38258
Serotype Distribution of clinical isolates of group B streptococci Isolated in Belgium : isolates from neonatal infection compared to isolates from infection in adult or colonization in pregnant women
English
MELIN, Pierrette mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Microbiologie médicale >]
Keke, D. [ > > ]
Campo, B. [ > > ]
HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Microbiologie médicale >]
CHRISTIAENS, Geneviève mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Direction médicale >]
De Mol, Patrick mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Microbiologie médicale et virologie médicale >]
Sep-2002
Program and Abstracts of the 43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
American Society of Microbiology
American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
Abstract du poster G-1461
Yes
No
International
Washington
USA
43rd Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)
du 27 au 30 septembre 2002
American Society of Microbiology
San Diego
USA
[en] Group B streptococci ; serotype distribution ; neonatal infection ; Adult infection ; vaginal colonization ; Belgium
[en] Background: Group B Streptococci cause invasive disease in neonates, pregnant women and non-pregnant
adults. In the last decades capsular serotypes (type) Ia, Ib, II and III caused the majority of clinical diseases.
More recently, in North America, type V emerged as the more common type in non-pregnant adults with
invasive disease.
Methods: From January 1999 through December 2001, we received and typed a total of 334 clinically
significant strains of GBS isolated in the laboratories belonging to the Belgian network for epidemiological
surveillance. 113 were recovered from neonates blood or cerebrospinal fluid (92 early onset EOD, 21 late
onset LOD), 14 were isolated from pregnant women with severe infections and 204 were recovered from
adults with invasive disease. From the same laboratories, during the first trimester of 2002, 302 isolates
from pregnant women were also typed (max. 5 isolates /lab.)
Results: In neonatal EOD type III was the more common (41,3%) followed by II (19.6%), Ia (16.3%), Ib
(13%), V (8.7%) and IV (1.1%), whereas type III caused the majority (85.7%) of LOD cases. In adults, all
types were well represented except type IV: 20.3% Ia, 12.7% Ib, 13.1% II, 23.1% III, 2.7% IV, 19% V and
9% remained non typeable (NT). In colonized pregnant women, all types were also well represented except
type IV: 25.5% Ia, 13.3% Ib, 14.9% II, 17.7% III, 5% IV, 15.5% V and 8.1% remained NT. Type III was
more frequently the cause of EOD than a colonizing strain during pregnancy and in contrast NT isolates did
not cause EOD (P<0.001)
Conclusions: 1) Type III was still the major type in neonatal infections in Belgium. 2) Type distribution of
GBS differed by age-group of patients 3) Type V belonged to the 3 more represented types in adults 4)
Compared to colonizing GBS in pregnant women, distribution of types causing EOD was different.
Centre National de Référence des Streptocoques du groupe B
Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/38258

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
GBS serotypes ICAAC 2002.pdfPublisher postprint121.22 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.