Reference : The Hybrid Finite-Element Mixing-Cell method: a new flexible method for large scale g...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference
Engineering, computing & technology : Geological, petroleum & mining engineering
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3781
The Hybrid Finite-Element Mixing-Cell method: a new flexible method for large scale groundwater modelling
English
Orban, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département Argenco : Secteur GEO3 > Hydrogéologie & Géologie de l'environnement >]
Brouyère, Serge mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département Argenco : Secteur GEO3 > Hydrogéologie & Géologie de l'environnement >]
Wildemeersch, Samuel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département Argenco : Secteur GEO3 > Hydrogéologie & Géologie de l'environnement >]
Couturier, Julie [Université de Liège - ULg > Département Argenco : Secteur GEO3 > Hydrogéologie & Géologie de l'environnement >]
Dassargues, Alain mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département Argenco : Secteur GEO3 > Hydrogéologie & Géologie de l'environnement >]
2008
No
International
CMWR XVII - Computational Methods in Water Resources
July 2008
San Francisco
USA
[en] regional groundwater modelling ; groundwater modeling ; Hybrid FEM ; mixing-cell ; finite element method ; large scale aquifer
[en] Interest of end-users and policy makers for understanding and managing water systems at the regional scale has increased for years. At this scale, groundwater models of different complexity ranging from black-box models to physically based distributed models have been used in various hydrogeological conditions. Black-box models, such as transfer functions, have been applied for example to model groundwater in large scale hydrological models, to model karstic systems, in particular for the interpretation of isotopic data. Their concepts are simple and attractive because they require relatively few data. The main drawbacks are however that modelling results are not spatially distributed and their predictive capability is questionable due to the semi-empirical nature of process descriptions. On the contrary, due to a more advanced description of ongoing processes, physically-based distributed models are expected to have better predictive capabilities than black-box models. However, because such models require more data, they are generally applied for case studies that are better characterized from a hydrogeological point of view, for which the distribution of water levels or solute concentrations in the groundwater systems are needed.
For large-scale modelling purposes, black-box models and physically-based distributed models have both proved their utilities and have their own justifications, advantages and disadvantages. However, few attempts have been made to combine the advantages of these two categories of approaches in a unified modelling application.
A new flexible modelling approach, the Hybrid Finite-Element Mixing-Cell method (HFEMC), has been developed that allows combining in a single model, and in a fully integrated way, different mathematical approaches of various complexities for groundwater modelling in complex and large scale environments. This method has been implemented in the groundwater flow and solute transport numerical code SUFT3D. The approach has been first tested and illustrated using basic and advanced “synthetic” examples that allow validating and discussing its advantages over existing modelling concepts. The HFEMC approach is now applied for the development of a large scale groundwater flow and solute transport model in different groundwater basins in Belgium.
Aquapôle - AQUAPOLE
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3781

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