Reference : Organ donors with primary central nervous system tumor
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Surgery
Human health sciences : Oncology
Human health sciences : Gastroenterology & hepatology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3727
Organ donors with primary central nervous system tumor
English
Detry, Olivier mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Honore, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Hans, Marie-France mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Delbouille, Marie-Hélène mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Jacquet, Nicolas [> >]
Meurisse, Michel mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Jul-2000
Transplantation
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
70
1
244-8; discussion 251-2
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0041-1337
1534-6080
Hagerstown
MD
[en] Brain Neoplasms/pathology ; Humans ; Neoplasm Metastasis ; Risk Factors ; Tissue Donors ; organ transplantation ; complication ; cancer
[en] Patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor have been accepted for organ donation because these tumors very rarely spread outside the CNS. However several case reports of CNS tumor transferral with organ transplantation recently challenged this attitude. Some risk factors for extraneural spread of CNS tumors have been determined, but the absence of risk factors does not exclude the possibility of metastases. To our knowledge, 13 cases of CNS tumor transferral with organ transplantation (one heart, three livers, eight kidneys, one kidney/pancreas) have been reported in the literature. Even if no prospective evaluation of the CNS tumor transmission risk with transplantation has been undergone, this risk may be estimated between a little more than 0% and 3% from retrospective series. The authors consider that patients with CNS tumor should be accepted as donors as long as the risk of dying on the waiting lists is significantly higher than the tumor transferral risk. Therefore the authors would have no restriction for transplanting organs from donors with benign or low-grade CNS tumor. For high-grade tumors, the authors would consider these donors as "marginal donors," and balance the risk of tumor transmission with the medical condition of the recipient.
Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3727

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