Reference : Expression of the interferon-alpha/beta-inducible bovine Mx1 dynamin interferes with ...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/34697
Expression of the interferon-alpha/beta-inducible bovine Mx1 dynamin interferes with replication of rabies virus
English
Leroy, Michael [Université de Liège - ULG > Morphologie et Pathologie > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies > >]
Pire, Grégory [Université de Liège > Morphologie et Pathologie > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies > >]
Baise, Etienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Macromolécules biologiques >]
Desmecht, Daniel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de morphologie et pathologie > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
2006
Neurobiology of Disease
Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science
21
3
515-521
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0969-9961
San Diego
[en] rabies ; rhabdoviridae ; interferon ; Mx
[en] Rabies is a fatal anthropozoonotic viral infection of the central nervous system that remains a serious public health problem in many countries. As several animal cases of spontaneous survival to infection were reported and because type 1 interferons were shown to protect against the virus, it was suggested that innate resistance mechanisms exist. Among the antiviral proteins that are synthesized in response to interferon-alpha/beta stimulation, Mx proteins from several species are long known to block the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). As both VSV and rabies virus belongs to the Rhabdoviridae family, this study was started with the aim to establish whether the anti-VSV activity of a mammalian Mx protein could be extended to rabies virus. This question was addressed by inoculating the virus onto a bovine Mx1 or human MxA-expressing Vero cell clone. Plaque formation was unambiguously blocked, and viral yields were reduced 100- to 1000-fold by bovine Mx1 expression for both SAG2 and SADB19 viral strains. In opposition, only SAG2 strain could be inhibited by the expression of human MxA protein. The effect of both proteins expression was then evaluated at the viral protein expression level. Again, boMx1 was able to repress protein expression in both strain, whereas only SAG2 proteins were inhibited in human MxA-expressing cells. These results suggest that protection conferred by interferon-alpha/beta against rabies could be, at least partially, attributable to the Mx pathway. Alternatively, bovine Mx1 could be unique in its ability to repress rabies virus which, if confirmed in vivo, would open an avenue for the development of new antirabies therapeutic strategies.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/34697
10.1016/j.nbd.2005.08.015

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