Reference : Derivation of Auroral Conductances from IMAGE FUV
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/33842
Derivation of Auroral Conductances from IMAGE FUV
English
Immel, T. J. mailto [Space Sciences Laboratory University of California Berkeley , Centennial Drive at Grizzly Peak, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 United States ;]
Mende, S. B. [Space Sciences Laboratory University of California Berkeley , Centennial Drive at Grizzly Peak, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 United States ;]
Frey, H. U. [Space Sciences Laboratory University of California Berkeley , Centennial Drive at Grizzly Peak, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 United States ;]
Gérard, Jean-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Hubert, Benoît mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
1-May-2001
No
No
International
AGU Spring meeting
American Geophysical Union
USA
[en] 0310 Airglow and aurora ; 0358 Thermosphere--energy deposition
[en] Auroral emissions are observed in 3 separate Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength regimes by IMAGE. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) is sensitive mainly to N[SUB]2[/SUB] LBH and N I emissions in the 140-190-nm range, while the Spectrographic Imager (SI) spectrally separates the OI 135.6-nm emission and Doppler shifted hydrogen emissions of the proton aurora at 121.8 nm. The brightness of the N[SUB]2[/SUB] LBH and OI 135.6-nm emissions depend in part on the spectrum and total energy flux of incoming electrons, and on the height-density profile of the respective species, and O[SUB]2[/SUB]. Due mainly to these atmospheric factors, the ratio of the N[SUB]2[/SUB] and OI emissions depends strongly on the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons which, once estimated, can in turn be used to calculate the total energy flux. The proton aurora generates secondary electrons, which excite additional emissions of N[SUB]2[/SUB] and OI. It is not possible to absolutely determine either the total proton energy flux or the characteristic proton energy (<E[SUB]p[/SUB]>) with a single proton imaging channel. However, the proton-induced N[SUB]2[/SUB] and OI emissions depend mainly on the total proton energy flux, so reasonable estimates of <E[SUB]p[/SUB]> can be used in the calculation of proton energy input. Ground-based or in-situ observations of proton energies can help in this determination. With accurate corrections for N[SUB]2[/SUB] and OI airglow emissions, and formulae such as those provided by Robinson et al. [1987], IMAGE FUV can provide global maps of height-integrated conductivity (conductance) in the auroral oval. It is also possible to examine the degree to which the proton aurora contributes to enhanced conductance on a global scale. The promise of providing these conductances using IMAGE's real-time capabilities will be discussed. Robinson, R. M., R. R. Vondrak, K. Miller, T. Dabbs, and D. Hardy, On Calculating Ionospheric Conductances from the Flux and Energy of Precipitating Electrons, J. Geophys. Res., 92, 2566, 1987.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/33842
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/61461
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM..SA41A10I

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