Reference : The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/33428
The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
English
Gladstone, G. R. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Persyn, S. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Eterno, J. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Slater, D. C. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Davis, M. W. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Versteeg, M. H. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Persson, K. B. mailto [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238, United States ;]
Siegmund, O. H. mailto [Sensor Sciences, 3333 Vincent Road, Pleasant Hill, CA 94523, United States ;]
Marquet, Benoit mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > CSL (Centre Spatial de Liège) >]
Gérard, Jean-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Grodent, Denis mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
1-Dec-2008
No
No
International
American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2008
15 - 19 December, 2008
San Francisco
CA
[en] 5706 Aurorae ; 7549 Ultraviolet emissions
[en] Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August 2016. The spinning (2 RPM), solar-powered Juno will study Jupiter from a highly elliptical orbit, in which the spacecraft (for about 6 hours once every 11 days) dives down over the north pole, skims the outermost atmosphere, and rises back up over the south pole. This orbit allows Juno avoid most of the intense particle radiation surrounding the planet and provides an excellent platform for investigating Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Part of the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere will involve remote sensing of the far-ultraviolet H and H2 auroral emissions, plus gases such as methane and acetylene which add their absorption signature to the H2 emissions. This hydrocarbon absorption can be used to estimate the energy of the precipitating electrons; since more energetic electrons penetrate deeper into the atmosphere and the UV emissions they produce will show more absorption. Juno will carry an Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) to make spectral images of Jupiter's aurora. UVS is a UV imaging spectrograph sensitive to both extreme and far ultraviolet emissions in the 70-205~nm range that will characterize the morphology and spectral nature of Jupiter's auroral emissions. Juno UVS consists of two separate sections: a dedicated telescope/spectrograph assembly and a vault electronics box. The telescope/spectrograph assembly contains a telescope which feeds a 0.15-m Rowland circle spectrograph. The telescope has an input aperture 40à 40~mm2 and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated at the front end of the telescope (used to target specific auroral features at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane) directs incoming light to the primary. The light is then focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a 'dog- bone' shape 6° long, in three 2° sections of 0.2°, 0.05°, and 0.2° width (projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses the UV bandpass onto a curved microchannel plate (MCP) cross delay line (XDL) detector with a solar blind UV- sensitive CsI photocathode, which makes up the instrument's focal plane. Tantalum shielding surrounds the detector assembly to protect the detector and the adjacent detector electronics from high-energy electrons. The main electronics box is located in the Juno vault. Inside are two redundant high-voltage power supplies (HVPS), two redundant low-voltage power supplies, the command and data handling (C&DH) electronics, heater/actuator activation electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. An overview of the UVS design and scientific performance will be presented.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/33428
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMSM41B1678G

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