Reference : Comparative antioxidant capacities of phenolic compounds measured by various tests
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
Life sciences : Biotechnology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3247
Comparative antioxidant capacities of phenolic compounds measured by various tests
English
Tabart, Jessica mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biologie moléculaire et biotechnologie végétales >]
Kevers, Claire mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biologie moléculaire et biotechnologie végétales >]
Pincemail, Joël mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie cardio-vasculaire >]
Defraigne, Jean-Olivier mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Chirurgie cardio-vasculaire et thoracique >]
Dommes, Jacques mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biologie moléculaire et biotechnologie végétales >]
2009
Food Chemistry
Elsevier Science
113
1226-1233
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0308-8146
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Antioxidant ; Anthocyanins ; Flavan-3-ols ; Flavonols ; Phenolics
[en] The purpose of this study was to compare the antioxidant capacities of standard compounds (phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, and glutathione) as measured by various assays. Five methods were selected so as to span a diversity of technical approaches: TEAC (radical 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6 sulphonic acid), DPPH (radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl used to measure reducing capacity), ORAC (oxygen radical scavenging capacity), red blood cell haemolysis (protection of biological sample), and ESR (electron spin resonance for direct free radical evaluation). Most compounds showed significant differences in free radical scavenging activity according to the method used. Of the 25 tested compounds, only a few, such as myricetin and gallocatechin, gave comparable activities in the various tests. To standardise reporting on antioxidant capacity, it is proposed to use a weighted mean of the values obtained using the DPPH, ORAC, resistance to haemolysis, and ESR assays.
This strategy was used to test the antioxidant capacity of several beverages. The highest antioxidant capacity was observed for red wine, followed by green tea, orange juice, grape juice, vegetable juice, and apple juice.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3247
10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.08.013

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Foodchem2008.pdfPublisher postprint918.83 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.