Reference : Electron microscopic study of measles virus infection: unusual antibody-triggered redist...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Immunology & infectious disease
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3206
Electron microscopic study of measles virus infection: unusual antibody-triggered redistribution of antigens on giant cells
English
Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L. [National Institutes of Health (NIH) - NINCDS - Bethesda, MD, USA > Infectious Diseases Branch > > > >]
Rentier, Bernard mailto [National Institutes of Health (NIH) - NINCDS - Bethesda, MD, USA > Infectious Diseases Branch > > > >]
Dubois-Dalcq, Monique [National Institutes of Health (NIH) - NINCDS - Bethesda, MD, USA > Infectious Diseases Branch > > >]
1979
Journal of Virology
American Society of Microbiology
29
2
666-676
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0022-538X
[en] Measles virus ; Antigenic modulation
[en] Vero cells infected with measles virus fuse to form multinucleated cells which incorporated virus-
specific antigens in their membrane. The distribution of these antigens was analyzed after a brief
treatment with human anti-measles immunoglobulin G, using autoradiography and immunoperoxidase
labeling combined with transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Virus-specific antigens were
distributed over the entire surface of giant cells treated at 4°C with human anti-measles
immunoglobulin G and labeled Protein A. When cells were shifted to 37°C, labeled antigen-antibody
complexes were redistributed in two stages. Patch formation occurred in 5 to 15 min. Later, antigen-
antibody complexes became concentrated in a paracentral "ring" rather than typical caps. Patch
formation occurred in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, whereas ring formation was inhibited by
metabolic inhibitors. These rings contained membrane folds, villi, and viral buds, whereas the rest of
the membrane was smooth. In addition, shedding, endocytosis of antigen-antibody complexes, and
reexpression of antigens were observed. Antibodies to nonviral membrane antigens induced the same
pattern of redistribution. Infected cells treated with anti-measles Fab' fragments maintained a
homogeneous distribution of label throughout the experiments. In conclusion, intact immunoglobulins,
but not Fab' fragments, were able to induce a dramatic redistribution of viral antigen on the membrane
of giant cells infected with measles virus.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3206

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