Reference : Hyperhydricity of micropropagated shoots: a typically stress-induced change of physio...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Microbiology
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
Life sciences : Biotechnology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3079
Hyperhydricity of micropropagated shoots: a typically stress-induced change of physiological state
English
Kevers, Claire mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biologie moléculaire et biotechnologie végétales >]
Franck, Thierry mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Anesthésiologie gén. et pathologie chirurg. des grds animaux >]
Strasser, Reto [Université de Genève - UNIGE > > Laboratoire de Bioénergétique > >]
Dommes, Jacques mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biologie moléculaire et biotechnologie végétales >]
Gaspar, Thomas mailto [> > Botanique, radiobotanique & serres expér. >]
May-2004
Plant Cell, Tissue & Organ Culture
Kluwer Academic Publ
77
2
181-191
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0167-6857
Dordrecht
[en] hyperhydricity ; JKB-trilogy ; micropropagation
[fr] state change ; stress concept
[en] Hyperhydricity of micropropagated shoots, formerly called vitrification, undoubtedly results from growth and culture conditions, subjectively reputated as stressing factors: wounding, infiltration of soft culture medium, generally of a high ionic strength, rich in nitrogen and in growth regulators in a special balance, in a humid and gaseous confined atmosphere. Stress is (objectively) defined as a disruption of homeostasis resulting from a constraint escaping the usual flexibility of metabolism. It induces another temporary (reversible) or definitive (irreversible) thermodynamic physiological state. The state-change concept developed by Strasser (1988) and Strasser and Tsimilli-Michael (2001) is applicable to the phenomenon of hyperhydricity. An appraisal of the redox capacities of hyperhydrated shoots together with a study of some enzymic activities that catalyse pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways has indeed shown that such shoots have evolved towards a temporary state of lower differentiation or a juvenile state with a sufficient activity to survive and to defend themselves.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/3079

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