Reference : Atomic oxygen distribution in the Venus mesosphere from observations of O[SUB]2[/SUB]...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/29011
Atomic oxygen distribution in the Venus mesosphere from observations of O[SUB]2[/SUB] infrared airglow by VIRTIS-Venus Express
English
Gérard, Jean-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Saglam, Adem [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Piccioni, Giuseppe [IASF-INAF, Roma, Italy]
Drossart, Pierre [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France]
Montmessin, Frank [Service d'aéronomie du CNRS, Verrières-le-Buisson, and Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France]
Bertaux, Jean-Loup [Service d'aéronomie du CNRS, Verrières-le-Buisson, and Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France]
1-Feb-2009
Icarus
Elsevier
199
264-272
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0019-1035
San Diego
CA
[en] This VIRTIS instrument on board Venus Express has collected spectrally resolved images of the Venus nightside limb that show the presence of the (0,0) band of the Deltag1-->Sigmag3 infrared atmospheric system of O[SUB]2[/SUB] at 1.27 mum. The emission is produced by three-body recombination of oxygen atoms created by photodissociation of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] on the dayside. It is consistently bright so that emission limb profiles can be extracted from the images. The vertical distribution of O[SUB]2[/SUB](Deltag1) may be derived following Abel inversion of the radiance limb profiles. Assuming photochemical equilibrium, it is combined with the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] vertical distribution to determine the atomic oxygen density. The uncertainties on the O density caused by the Abel inversion reach a few percent at the peak, increasing to about 50% near 120 km. We first analyze a case when the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] density was derived from a stellar occultation observed with the SPICAV spectrometer simultaneously with an image of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] limb airglow. In other cases, an average CO[SUB]2[/SUB] profile deduced from a series of ultraviolet stellar occultations is used to derive the O profile, leading to uncertainties on the O density less than 30%. It is found that the maximum O density is generally located between 94 and 115 km with a mean value of 104 km. It ranges from less than 1×10[SUP][/SUP] to about 5×10[SUP][/SUP] cm[SUP][/SUP] with a global mean of 2.2×10[SUP][/SUP] cm[SUP][/SUP]. These values are in reasonable agreement with the VIRA midnight oxygen profile. The vertical O distribution is generally in good agreement with the oxygen profile calculated with a one-dimensional chemical-diffusive model. No statistical latitudinal dependence of the altitude of the oxygen peak is observed, but the maximum O density tends to decrease with increasing northern latitudes. The latitudinal distribution at a given time exhibits large variations in the O density profile and its vertical structure. The vertical oxygen distribution frequently shows multiple peaks possibly caused by waves or variations in the structure of turbulent transport. It is concluded that the O[SUB]2[/SUB] infrared night airglow is a powerful tool to map the distribution of atomic oxygen in the mesosphere between 90 and 115 km and improve future Venus reference atmosphere models.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/29011
10.1016/j.icarus.2008.09.016
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Icar..199..264G

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