Reference : Laminarin in the dietary fibre concept
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Agriculture & agronomy
Life sciences : Food science
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Chemistry
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/22011
Laminarin in the dietary fibre concept
English
Deville, Christelle mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques >]
Damas, Jacques mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques >]
Forget, Pierre [> >]
Dandrifosse, Guy mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Faculté de médecine) > Relations académiques et scientifiques (Médecine) >]
Peulen, Olivier mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques >]
Jul-2004
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
John Wiley & Sons Ltd
84
9
1030-1038
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0022-5142
Chichester
[en] seaweed ; dietary fibre ; gastrointestinal tract ; transit ; intestinal motility
[en] Dietary fibres consist of edible plant polysaccharides that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but undergo complete or partial fermentation in the colon. Seaweeds, notably Laminaria spp, are particularly rich in polysaccharides resistant to hydrolysis in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are, in consequence, considered as dietary fibres. Most of the carbohydrates from Laminaria spp are thought to be indigestible by humans. The main storage polysaccharide of these algae is laminarin, a beta-polymer of glucose. The aims of this work were, on the one hand, to compare various methods of extraction of laminarin by partial characterisation of the product obtained and, on the other hand, to study the fate of this polysaccharide and its effects in the gastrointestinal tract in order to determine its potential as a dietary fibre in human nutrition. Among four methods tested to extract laminarin, the best appeared to be a hot HCl-based method. Human digestive enzymes did not hydrolyse laminarin, so this polysaccharide can be considered as a dietary fibre. After ingestion by rats, this polysaccharide was not found in faeces of these animals. It did not increase the intestinal transit and stool output in vivo, but it increased the contractile response of the stomach to acetylcholine in vitro. (C) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/22011

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
JSFA84-1030.pdfPublisher postprint174.87 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.