Reference : Beliefs in the population about cracking sounds produced during spinal manipulation
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Orthopedics, rehabilitation & sports medicine
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/215699
Beliefs in the population about cracking sounds produced during spinal manipulation
English
Demoulin, Christophe mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences de la motricité > Kinésithérapie spécifique et réadaptation motrice >]
Baeri, Damien [> >]
TOUSSAINT, Geoffrey [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service de médecine de l'appareil locomoteur >]
CAGNIE, Barbara [> >]
BEERNAERT, Axel [> >]
Kaux, Jean-François mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences de la motricité > Médecine physique, réadaptation et traumatologie du sport >]
Vanderthommen, Marc mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences de la motricité > Kinésithérapie spécifique et réadaptation motrice >]
In press
Joint Bone Spine
Elsevier Science
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1297-319X
1778-7254
Paris
France
[en] Pain ; Spine
[en] Objectives: To examine beliefs about cracking sounds heard during highvelocity
lowamplitude (HVLA) thrust spinal manipulation in individuals with and without personal experience of this technique.
Methods: We included 100 individuals. Among them, 60 had no history of spinal manipulation, including 40whowereasymptomatic with or without a past history of spinal pain and 20whohad nonspecific spinal pain. The remaining 40 patients had a history of spinal manipulation;amongthem, 20 were asymptomatic and 20 had spinal pain. Participants attended a oneonone interview during which they completed a questionnaire about their history of spinal manipulation and their beliefs regarding sounds heard during spinal manipulation.
Results: Mean age was 43.5±15.4 years. The sounds were ascribed to vertebral repositioning by 49% of participants and to friction between two vertebras by 23% of participants; only 9% of participants correctly ascribed the sound to the release of gas. The sound was mistakenly considered to indicate successful spinal manipulation by 40% of participants. No differences in beliefs were found between the groups with and without a history of spinal manipulation.
Conclusions: Certain beliefs have documented adverse effects. This study showed a high prevalence of unfounded beliefs regarding spinal manipulation. These beliefs deserve greater attention from healthcare providers, particularly those who practice spinal manipulation.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/215699
10.1016/j.jbspin.2017.04.006

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