Reference : Voice use among music theory teachers: A voice dosimetry and self-assessment study
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Otolaryngology
Arts & humanities : Languages & linguistics
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/212912
Voice use among music theory teachers: A voice dosimetry and self-assessment study
English
Schiller, Isabel mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Logopédie > Logopédie des troubles de la voix >]
Morsomme, Dominique mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Logopédie > Logopédie des troubles de la voix >]
Remacle, Angélique mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Logopédie > Logopédie des troubles de la voix >]
In press
Journal of Voice
Mosby
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0892-1997
1557-8658
St Louis
MO
[en] Vocal loading ; Voice accumulation ; Occupational voice ; Background noise ; Lombard effect ; Self-evaluation ; music teachers
[en] Objectives: (1) To investigate music theory teachers’ professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data.
Methods: Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. Parameters analysed were voice SPL, F0, phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI) and noise SPL. Spearman’s correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0 and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analogue scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman’s correlation.
Results: Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time and females’ F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue and amount of singing and speaking voice produced.
Conclusions: Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well-aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analogue scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/212912
10.1016/j.jvoice.2017.06.020

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